GC43H:
The Role of Fire in the Earth System: Understanding Drivers, Feedbacks, and Interactions with the Land, Atmosphere, and Society III


Session ID#: 10330

Session Description:
Anthropogenic and natural fires are an important component of the Earth system. Geographic location, fuel type, seasonality and intensity of fire largely determine the direction and magnitude of feedbacks on the Earth system. The aim of this session is to explore links between fire, vegetation, climate and humans from the local to the global scale and determine how these interactions will change in a warming world. We encourage abstracts that explore the interactions of fires with the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere using remote sensing, in situ observations, modeling, or an integrated approach with an emphasis on (1) impacts of fire on climate, meteorology, atmospheric chemistry and air quality, (2) the role of fires in the carbon cycle and ecosystem functioning, (3) the influence of humans on fire (and vice versa), and (4) the changing nature of fire over millennia, and predictions for the future.
Primary Convener:  Sander Veraverbeke, University of California Irvine, Department of Earth System Science, Irvine, CA, United States
Conveners:  Mick Tosca, NASA Jet Propulsion Lab, Los Angeles, CA, United States, Daniel S Ward, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States and Brendan M Rogers, Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth, United States
Chairs:  Mick Tosca, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States, Daniel S Ward, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States, Brendan M Rogers, Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth, United States and Sander Veraverbeke, University of California Irvine, Department of Earth System Science, Irvine, CA, United States
OSPA Liaison:  Brendan M Rogers, Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth, United States

Cross-Listed:
  • A - Atmospheric Sciences
  • B - Biogeosciences
  • NH - Natural Hazards
Index Terms:

0315 Biosphere/atmosphere interactions [ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE]
0428 Carbon cycling [BIOGEOSCIENCES]
1640 Remote sensing [GLOBAL CHANGE]
3390 Wildland fire model [ATMOSPHERIC PROCESSES]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Jennifer R Marlon, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States, Brian Indrek Magi, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, United States, Patrick J Bartlein, University of Oregon, Geography, Eugene, OR, United States, Ryan Kelly, university of illinois, Urbana, IL, United States and Anne-Laure Daniau, CNRS, Paris Cedex 16, France
Yang Chen, University of California, Earth System Science, Irvine, CA, United States, James Tremper Randerson, University of California Irvine, Earth System Science, Irvine, CA, United States, Douglas C Morton, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Biospheric Sciences Laboratory, Greenbelt, United States, Niels Andela, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States and Louis Giglio, NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, MD, United States
Silvia Kloster and Gitta Lasslop, Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany
Andreas Veira1,2, Gitta Lasslop2 and Silvia Kloster2, (1)International Max Planck Research School on Earth System Modelling, Hamburg, Germany, (2)Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany
Robert D Field, Columbia University, New York, United States; NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, United States
Michael Johns Medler, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA, United States
William C Hockaday, Baylor University, Department of Geosciences, Waco, United States, Joseph D White, Baylor University, Waco, TX, United States, Justin Von Bargen, Baylor University, Geology, Waco, TX, United States and Jian Yao, Baylor Univ, Waco, TX, United States
Alan J. Tepley, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, Conservation Ecology Center, Front Royal, VA, United States, Thomas T Veblen, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO, United States, George Perry, University of Auckland, School of Environment, Auckland, New Zealand and Kristina J Anderson-Teixeira, Smithsonian Institution, Front Royal, United States