GC14A:
Adapting to Rates of Climate Change: Natural and Human Dimensions I


Session ID#: 10431

Session Description:
Most discussion related to adaptation to climate change and its impacts has focused on amounts of climate change (e.g., adaptation to 2 °C warming or 100 cm of sea level rise). However, it is becoming increasingly clear that, as climate continues to change, ecosystems and human systems will need to continuously adapt to a moving target. It is useful to think about adaptation in terms of adjusting to and planning for rates of change and not only in terms of some specific amount of change. This perspective is implicit in recent discussions of velocity of climate change and rates of biological adaptation and deserves a more central role in investigations of human dimensions of adaptation.

This session will bring together natural scientists and social scientists who are investigating adaptation of natural and human systems to past and potential future rates of change.

Primary Conveners:  Ken Caldeira, Carnegie Institution for Science, Dept. of Global Ecology, Washington, DC, United States
Conveners:  Soheil Shayegh, Carnegie Institution for Science, Dept. of Global Ecology, Washington, DC, United States and Juan Moreno-Cruz, Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Economics, Atlanta, GA, United States
Chairs:  Ken Caldeira1, Juan Moreno-Cruz2 and Kate Ricke1, (1)Carnegie Institution for Science Washington, Washington, DC, United States(2)Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Economics, Atlanta, GA, United States
OSPA Liaisons:  Soheil Shayegh, Carnegie Institution for Science Washington, Washington, DC, United States

Cross-Listed:
  • B - Biogeosciences
  • OS - Ocean Sciences
  • PP - Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology
  • SI - Societal Impacts and Policy Sciences
Index Terms:

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Constantine Samaras and Lauren Marie Cook, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Ines Azevedo, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Frances Claire Moore, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, United States
Soheil Shayegh, Carnegie Institution for Science, Washington, DC, United States, Ken Caldeira, Carnegie Institution for Science Washington, Washington, DC, United States and Juan Moreno-Cruz, Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Economics, Atlanta, GA, United States
Kate Ricke and Ken Caldeira, Carnegie Institution for Science Washington, Washington, DC, United States
Yann Chavaillaz1, Sylvie Joussaume2, Pascale Braconnot1 and Robert Vautard3, (1)LSCE Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex, France, (2)IPSL/LSCE (Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement), CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France, (3)LSCE Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, Gif-Sur-Yvette, France
Anna LoPresti1, Steven J Davis1, Noah S Diffenbaugh2, James Tremper Randerson3, Dawn Woodard4 and Allison Charland5, (1)University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, United States, (2)Stanford University, Earth System Science and Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford, CA, United States, (3)University of California, Earth System Science, Irvine, CA, United States, (4)Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, United States, (5)Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States
Ken Caldeira, Carnegie Institution for Science Washington, Washington, DC, United States, Juan Moreno-Cruz, Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Economics, Atlanta, GA, United States and Soheil Shayegh, Carnegie Institution for Science, Dept. of Global Ecology, Washington, DC, United States