P31D:
The Physical Conditions Controlling Life's Origin, Evolution, and End I Posters


Session ID#: 7574

Session Description:
New insights into Mars’ wet past, the confirmation of a liquid ocean on Ganymede, and the ongoing stream of exoplanet discoveries raise the prospect of an ever-wider range of environments that could sustain life. This session explores how such environments emerge, are sustained, and eventually decline.

Questions of particular interest include: What is Earth’s long-term climatic stability and how will it end? How long did habitable conditions persist on Mars and did they ever exist on Venus? What habitable environments exist in the outer Solar System and how do they continue to evolve? How do the Faint Young Sun Problem, the Runaway Greenhouse, and long-term climate feedbacks play out across different planets and outside the Solar System?

We invite case studies and comparisons that use observations, experiments and/or modeling to expand our understanding of the habitability of diverse environments in our Solar System and beyond.

Primary Conveners:  Daniel D.B. Koll, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States
Conveners:  Jun Yang, Peking University, Beijing, China and Nathaniel Jacob Kahane Baskin, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States
Chairs:  Nathaniel Jacob Kahane Baskin1, Jun Yang2 and Daniel D.B. Koll1, (1)University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States(2)Peking University, Beijing, China
OSPA Liaisons:  Jun Yang, Peking University, Beijing, China
Co-Organized with:
Planetary Sciences, Atmospheric Sciences, and Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology

Cross-Listed:
  • A - Atmospheric Sciences
  • B - Biogeosciences
  • PP - Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology
Index Terms:

0325 Evolution of the atmosphere [ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE]
0406 Astrobiology and extraterrestrial materials [BIOGEOSCIENCES]
5215 Origin of life [PLANETARY SCIENCES: ASTROBIOLOGY]
6296 Extra-solar planets [PLANETARY SCIENCES: SOLAR SYSTEM OBJECTS]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Feng Ding, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States and Raymond Pierrehumbert, University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford, United Kingdom
Shi Sim, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, Dave R Stegman, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States and Nicolas Coltice, LGLTPE Laboratoire de Géologie de Lyon : Terre, Planètes et Environnement, Villeurbanne Cedex, France
Dorian S Abbot, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States
Jun Yang1, Dorian S Abbot2, Eric T Wolf3, Jeremy Leconte4, Timothy M Merlis5, Daniel D.B. Koll2, Colin Goldblatt6, Feng Ding2, Francois Forget7 and Brian Toon8, (1)Peking University, Beijing, China, (2)University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States, (3)University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO, United States, (4)LMD, CNRS, Paris, France, Paris, France, (5)McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada, (6)University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada, (7)Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, Paris Cedex 16, France, (8)University of Colorado at Boulder, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Boulder, CO, United States
Nathaniel Jacob Kahane Baskin, Daniel C Fabrycky and Dorian S Abbot, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States
Daniel D.B. Koll and Dorian S Abbot, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States

See more of: Planetary Sciences