GC11C:
Climate Refugia in a Changing World: Climatic and Hydrologic Processes Informing Ecological Responses I Posters


Session ID#: 7823

Session Description:
Paleohistorical climate refugia are well known in Quaternary Sciences as regions that remained buffered against cold Pleistocene climates and acted as safe havens and sources of re-colonization for populations of warm-adapted species. Climate refugia are increasingly discussed in the context of contemporary climate change as areas buffered from the intensity and pace of change, and where species would persist passively or through targeted management actions. Attractive as the concept is, little is known about physical processes that decouple local and micro-climates from regional conditions, whether areas currently buffered would remain refugia or would warm at greater rates as other areas, and how such areas might be used by species. We invite contributions that investigate climate refugia: their underlying physical (climatic and hydrologic) processes, subsequent ecological responses, methods for identifying, and approaches for monitoring and validating potential refugia.

Primary Conveners:  Connie Millar, USDA Forest Service, PSW Research Station, Albany, CA, United States
Conveners:  Toni Lyn Morelli, US Geological Survey, Northeast Climate Science Center, Amherst, MA, United States; University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, United States and Connie Millar, USDA Forest Service, PSW Research Station, Albany, CA, United States
Chairs:  Toni Lyn Morelli, US Geological Survey, Northeast Climate Science Center, Amherst, MA, United States; University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, United States and Connie Millar, USDA Forest Service, PSW Research Station, Albany, CA, United States
OSPA Liaisons:  Toni Lyn Morelli, US Geological Survey, Northeast Climate Science Center, Amherst, MA, United States; University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, United States

Cross-Listed:
  • B - Biogeosciences
Index Terms:

0410 Biodiversity [BIOGEOSCIENCES]
1616 Climate variability [GLOBAL CHANGE]
1620 Climate dynamics [GLOBAL CHANGE]
1630 Impacts of global change [GLOBAL CHANGE]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

James H Thorne1, Jacquelyn Bjorkman1, Ryan Boynton1, Joseph Stewart1, Andrew Holguin1, Mark Schwartz1 and Whitney Albright2, (1)University of California Davis, Davis, CA, United States, (2)California State Government, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Sacramento, CA, United States
Connie Millar, USDA Forest Service, PSW Research Station, Vallejo, CA, United States, David A Charlet, College of Southern Nevada, Biology, Las Vegas, NV, United States, Robert D Westfall, USDA Forest Service, PSW Research Station, Albany, CA, United States and Diane Delany, USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, Albany, CA, United States
Tyler J Tran1, Jamis M Bruening1, Andrew G Bunn2, Matthew W Salzer3 and Stuart B Weiss4, (1)Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA, United States, (2)Western Washington University, Environmental Sciences, Bellingham, WA, United States, (3)University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States, (4)Creekside Center for Earth Observation, Menlo Park, CA, United States
Jamis M Bruening1, Tyler J Tran1, Andrew G Bunn2, Matthew W Salzer3 and Stuart B Weiss4, (1)Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA, United States, (2)Western Washington University, Environmental Sciences, Bellingham, WA, United States, (3)University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States, (4)Creekside Center for Earth Observation, Menlo Park, CA, United States
Colin Taylor Maher, University of Montana, Missoula, MT, United States and Claudine Tobalske, Spatial Analysis Lab, Montana Natural Heritage Program, Montana Department of Natural Resources and Convervation, Missoula, MT, United States
Kate Marie Wilkin1, David Ackerly1 and Scott A. Stephens2, (1)University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, United States, (2)University of California Berkeley, ESPM, Berkeley, CA, United States
Gesuri Ramirez1, Geovany A Ramirez2, Sergio Armando Vargas Jr1, Naomi Robin Luna1 and Craig E Tweedie3, (1)University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX, United States, (2)Jornada Basin LTER, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, United States, (3)University of Texas at El Paso, Biological Science and the Environmental Science and Engineering Program, El Paso, TX, United States
Scotty Strachan, University of Nevada Reno, Reno, NV, United States, Christopher Daly, PRISM Climate Group, College of Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States and Connie Millar, USDA Forest Service, PSW Research Station, Albany, CA, United States
James Shulmeister1, Tim Cohen2, Kevin Kiernan3, Craig Woodward1, Tim Barrows4, Kat Fitzsimmons5, Justine Kemp6, Robert Haworth7, Douglas H Clark8, Allen M Gontz9, Jie Chang1, Daniela Mueller2, Adrian Slee1 and Daniel Ellerton1, (1)University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia, (2)University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia, (3)University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia, (4)University of Exeter, Plymouth, United Kingdom, (5)Max Plank Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany, (6)Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia, (7)University of New England, Armidale, Australia, (8)Western WashingtonUniversity, Bellingham, United States, (9)University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA, United States