P13A:
Enceladus: Decade's Observance of a Habitable World II Posters


Session ID#: 7905

Session Description:
This year marks the 10th anniversary of the discovery of the geysering south polar terrain of Saturn's small icy moon, Enceladus, and ten years of routine observing and studying its activity from the Cassini spacecraft.  Over the course of the last decade, it has become increasingly clear that Enceladus' geysers erupt from a large, long-lived, sub-ice-shell liquid water reservoir, chemically suitable for the sustenance of biological processes and directly accessible to sampling and analysis.  And by the time this session is convened, two of the last 3 close, targetted flybys that Cassini will make of Enceladus will have been completed and the data available for presentation. In this  session, we will focus on the most recent observational, theoretical and modeling results on the chemistry, state and dynamics of Enceladus' geysers, the moon's thermal and interior state, geologic activity, as well as its astrobiological potential.
Primary Convener:  Christopher P McKay, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States
Convener:  Carolyn Porco, Space Science Institute, CICLOPS, Boulder, CO, United States
Chairs:  Christopher P McKay, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States and Carolyn Porco, University of California Berkeley, Space Sciences Lab, Berkeley, CA, United States
OSPA Liaison:  Christopher P McKay, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States

Cross-Listed:
  • B - Biogeosciences
Index Terms:

5215 Origin of life [PLANETARY SCIENCES: ASTROBIOLOGY]
6282 Enceladus [PLANETARY SCIENCES: SOLAR SYSTEM OBJECTS]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Brent Sherwood, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States
Nozair Khawaja1, Frank Postberg1, René Reviol1, Lenz Nölle1, Fabian Klenner1 and Ralf Srama2, (1)University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany, (2)University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany
Carolyn Porco, University of California Berkeley, Space Sciences Lab, Berkeley, CA, United States, Francis Nimmo, University of California-Santa Cruz, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States and Daiana DiNino, Space Science Institute Boulder, CICLOPS, Boulder, CO, United States
An Yin1, Andrew V Zuza1 and Robert T Pappalardo2, (1)University of California Los Angeles, Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (2)NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, United States
Andrew P. Ingersoll1, Miki Nakajima1, Shawn Ewald1 and Peter Gao2, (1)California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, United States, (2)Carnegie Institution for Science, Earth & Planets Laboratory, Washington, DC, United States
Antony Trinh1, Tim Van Hoolst1, Rose-Marie Baland1,2, Mikael Beuthe1, Attilio Rivoldini1 and Veronique M A Dehant1, (1)Royal Observatory of Belgium, Brussels, Belgium, (2)Université Catholique de Louvain, Earth and Life Institute, Louvain-La-Neuve, Belgium

See more of: Planetary Sciences