PA32A:
Looking to the Future of Antarctic and Southern Ocean Research I


Session ID#: 8827

Session Description:
Antarctic and Southern Ocean research is advancing science on many frontiers, from climate change to astrophysics to biology. The continent is the coldest, driest, highest, windiest, and most remote continent on Earth, and it offers an unparalleled platform for making profound scientific discoveries about our planet and about the universe beyond. But conducting research in this harsh environment is hugely challenging and requires substantial resources to establish and maintain infrastructure for housing, transportation, and research support.  The science community has been working both at a national and international levels to develop strategic plans for the future of Antarctic science.  This session will explore ideas about the future of the Antarctic research enterprise and of the infrastructure to support this research.   We will discuss outcomes of recent community-driven advisory efforts and current developments.
Primary Convener:  Terry J Wilson, Ohio State University Main Campus, Columbus, OH, United States
Conveners:  Robin Elizabeth Bell, Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY, United States, Mahlon C Kennicutt II, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, United States and Laurie Geller, National Academy of Sciences, Polar Research Board, Washington, DC, United States
Chairs:  Robin Elizabeth Bell, Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY, United States and Mahlon C Kennicutt II, Retired, Washington, DC, United States
OSPA Liaison:  Laurie Geller, National Academy of Sciences, Polar Research Board, Washington, DC, United States

Cross-Listed:
  • C - Cryosphere
  • SI - Societal Impacts and Policy Sciences
Index Terms:

0799 General or miscellaneous [CRYOSPHERE]
9310 Antarctica [GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Robert A Weller, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Robin Elizabeth Bell, Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY, United States and Laurie Geller, National Academy of Sciences, Polar Research Board, Washington, DC, United States
David Glyn Vaughan and Tim M. Stockings, NERC British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Thomas Paul Wagner, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, United States, Eric Y Larour, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States and Charles E Webb, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies Greenbelt, Greenbelt, MD, United States
Nicole Biebow, Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research Bremerhaven, Bremerhaven, Germany and EU-PolarNet consortium
Gary S Wilson, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, Craig Cary, University of Waikato, International Centre for Terrestrial Antarctic Research, Hamilton, New Zealand, Vonda Cummings, NIWA National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Wellington, New Zealand, Ian Hawes, University of Canterbury, Gateway Antarctica, Christchurch, New Zealand, Soon Gyu Hong, Korea Polar Research Institute, Incheon, Korea, Republic of (South) and Morgan Coleman, Landcare Research, Lincoln, New Zealand
Lynne D Talley, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States
Mahlon C Kennicutt II, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, United States
Michelle Rogan-Finnemore, Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs Secretariat, Christchurch, New Zealand, Mahlon C Kennicutt II, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, United States and Yeadong Kim, KOPRI, Incheon, Korea, Republic of (South)

See more of: Public Affairs