H049:
Era of Water Crisis in the Southeastern U.S.: Attributions, Impacts, and Projections





Session ID#: 21901

Session Description:
The southeastern U.S. (SEUS) is now facing era of water crisis as a consequence of climate change and the compounding impacts of human disturbance. Extreme events occur more often (e.g., 2016 SEUS Drought and Hurricane Matthew) and water demand increases rapidly due to population growth. In this era, water resources management becomes more challenging to the SEUS states.

          To design the SEUS states more sustainable, we need to better understand what cause changes in extremes, what are the impacts of these changes at the local, state, and inter-state levels, and how extremes change in the future. We invite presentations including the detection and attribution of the changes in extremes, the hydrologic, ecological, and socio-economic impacts of these changes, the future changes of extremes in the projections and their uncertainties, and the response and recovery practices for water crisis at intra- and inter-state levels. We also seek abstracts containing outreach activities.

Primary Convener:  Jonghun Kam, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, United States
Conveners:  Glenn A Tootle, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, United States, Venkataraman Lakshmi, University of South Carolina Columbia, Columbia, SC, United States and Ray Huffaker, University of Florida, Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ft Walton Beach, FL, United States
Co-Organized with:
Hydrology, and Natural Hazards

Cross-Listed:
  • NH - Natural Hazards
Index Terms:

1812 Drought [HYDROLOGY]
1821 Floods [HYDROLOGY]
4313 Extreme events [NATURAL HAZARDS]
4343 Preparedness and planning [NATURAL HAZARDS]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Yifan Cheng1, Ryan J Niemeyer1, Xiao Zhang2, John R Yearsley1, Nathalie Voisin2 and Bart Nijssen1, (1)University of Washington Seattle Campus, Seattle, WA, United States, (2)Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, United States
Glenn A Tootle1, Venkataraman Lakshmi2, Matt Therrell1, Ray Huffaker3 and Emily A Elliott4, (1)University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, United States, (2)Univ South Carolina, Columbia, SC, United States, (3)University of Florida, Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ft Walton Beach, FL, United States, (4)University of Alabama, Department of Geography, Tuscaloosa, AL, United States
James Cruise, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL, United States and Cameron T Handyside, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Earth System Science Center, Huntsville, AL, United States
Seth Edward Younger, University of Georgia, Warnell School of Forestry, Athens, GA, United States and Charles Rhett Jackson, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, United States
Katie Glodzik, University of Florida, School of Natural Resources and Environment, Gainesville, FL, United States, David A Kaplan, University of Florida, Environmental Engineering Sciences, Ft Walton Beach, FL, United States and Geraldine Klarenberg, University of Florida, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Gainesville, FL, United States

See more of: Hydrology