H123:
The Roles of Atmospheric Circulation and Climate Variability in the Occurrence of Hydrometeorological Extremes: Diagnosis, Modeling and Prediction





Session ID#: 22795

Session Description:
Hydrometeorological extremes constitute one major trigger for a spectrum of natural hazards that collectively cause significant socio-economical losses. The often successive occurrences of flood and landslide are typically attributable to a sequence of rainfall events featured by high intensity or extended duration. The sequence of such rainfall events can often be grouped and categorized into one well-organized hydrometeorological extreme event that propagates spatially, swiping over the flooded region over a certain time, with some intermittence. The association between atmospheric circulation, climate variability and the occurrence of hydrometeorological extremes with various characteristics is evidenced. We seek submissions that emphasize on investigating the roles of atmospheric circulation and climate variability, in different space-time scales, in the occurrence of extremes, and provide diagnostic analysis and/or modelling of the physically system, potentially contribute to improve the prediction of such events.
Primary Convener:  Mengqian Lu, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Conveners:  Naresh Devineni, CUNY City College of New York, New York, NY, United States, Antara Banerjee, Columbia University of New York, Palisades, NY, United States and Yang Hong, University of Oklahoma Norman Campus, Department of Civil Engineering and Environmental Sciences, Norman, OK, United States

Cross-Listed:
  • A - Atmospheric Sciences
  • NH - Natural Hazards
Index Terms:

1840 Hydrometeorology [HYDROLOGY]
3305 Climate change and variability [ATMOSPHERIC PROCESSES]
3364 Synoptic-scale meteorology [ATMOSPHERIC PROCESSES]
4313 Extreme events [NATURAL HAZARDS]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Elizabeth Carter and Scott Steinschneider, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States
Bor-Ting Jong1, Mingfang Ting2, Richard Seager2, Naomi Henderson2 and Dong Lee2, (1)Columbia University of New York, Palisades, NY, United States, (2)Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY, United States
David J Farnham, Columbia University, Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering, New York, NY, United States, Scott Steinschneider, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States and Upmanu Lall, Columbia Univ, New York, NY, United States
Florian Willkofer, Raul R. Wood, Fabian von Trentini, Franz-Josef Schmid and Ralf Ludwig, Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Geography, Munich, Germany
Xuezhi Tan, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, Thian Yew Yew Gan, Univ Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada and Yongqin David Chen, Chinese University Hong Kong, Shatin Nt, Hong Kong
L. Ruby Leung1, Robert Houze2, Zhe Feng3 and Qing Yang1, (1)Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, United States, (2)University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States, (3)Joint Global Change Research Institute, College Park, MD, United States
Sanaz Moghim, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran and Mostafa Javadian, Sharif University of Technology, Civil Engineering, Tehran, Iran
Lance F Bosart, University at Albany State University of New York, Albany, NY, United States, Philippe P. Papin, University at Albany State University of New York, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, Albany, NY, United States and Alicia Marie Bentley, SUNY at Albany, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, Albany, NY, United States
Thian Yew Yew Gan, University of Alberta, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Edmonton, AB, Canada, Xuezhi Tan, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada and Yongqin David Chen, Chinese University Hong Kong, Shatin Nt, Hong Kong

See more of: Hydrology