IN010:
Big Data Approaches for NASA Science Missions





Session ID#: 22854

Session Description:
Approaches for deriving new science from data holdings of NASA’s science missions are evolving to employ new computational resources, techniques and architectures common to big data problem sets in other fields. Current NASA missions, such as the Solar Dynamics Observatory can generate hundreds of terabytes of data annually while models supporting and employing Earth or planetary observations can produce petascale datasets. The result is that NASA science mission data sets are now so large, streaming so fast, and characterized by such complexity that traditional data processing and analysis methods are inadequate. This session includes examples of novel approaches for satisfying NASA’s growing “big data” needs with new methods, technologies and processing models. Papers in this session will describe applications of big data technologies, cloud computing, data analytics, modeling workflows, and data discovery to current or anticipated NASA science missions.
Primary Convener:  Neal E Hurlburt, Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA, United States
Conveners:  Charles P Holmes, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, United States and James L Kinter, George Mason University Fairfax, Fairfax, VA, United States; Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Fairfax, VA, United States

Cross-Listed:
  • A - Atmospheric Sciences
  • P - Planetary Sciences
  • SH - SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics
  • SM - SPA-Magnetospheric Physics

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

James L Kinter1, Charles P Holmes2, Reta F Beebe3, Eric Feigelson4, Neal E Hurlburt5, Chris Mentzel6, Gerald Smith2, Clayton Tino7 and Raymond J Walker8, (1)George Mason University Fairfax, Fairfax, VA, United States, (2)NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, United States, (3)New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, United States, (4)Pennsylvania State University Main Campus, University Park, PA, United States, (5)Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA, United States, (6)Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Palo Alto, CA, United States, (7)Virtustream, Atlanta, GA, United States, (8)University of California Los Angeles, Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States
Reta F Beebe, New Mexico State University Main Campus, Las Cruces, NM, United States and Raymond J Walker, University of California Los Angeles, Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States
Chris Mentzel, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Palo Alto, CA, United States
Charles P Holmes, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, United States, Eric Feigelson, Pennsylvania State University Main Campus, University Park, PA, United States, Neal E Hurlburt, Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA, United States and Clayton Tino, Virtustream, Atlanta, GA, United States
Eric Feigelson, Pennsylvania State University Main Campus, University Park, PA, United States
Neal E Hurlburt, Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA, United States, Eric Feigelson, Pennsylvania State University Main Campus, University Park, PA, United States and Chris Mentzel, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Palo Alto, CA, United States
Eric Feigelson, Pennsylvania State University Main Campus, University Park, PA, United States, Raymond J Walker, University of California Los Angeles, Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States, James L Kinter, Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Fairfax, VA, United States and Clayton Tino, Virtustream, Atlanta, GA, United States
Roy Prouty, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD, United States, Jacqueline LeMoigne, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States and Milton Halem, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Computer Science, Baltimore, MD, United States
Maria Navas-Moreno1, James Parr2, Eric Lee Dahlstrom3 and Sara Beth Jennings2, (1)Self Employed, Washington, DC, United States, (2)NASA Frontier Development Lab, Mountain View, CA, United States, (3)International Space University, Strasbourg, France