NG005:
Earth System Dynamics, Complexity and Predictability: Interdisciplinary Approaches for Improving Geophysical Understanding and Prediction





Session ID#: 23196

Session Description:
Our planet is a complex dynamical system involving a coherent diversity of processes and interactions across spatio-temporal scales. Albeit its dynamical complexity, core physical principles regulate individual and cooperative geophysical processes and interactions, ultimately relating to the overall system dynamics.

This session focuses on advances in methodological, theoretical and applied studies in earth system dynamics, eliciting its regimes, transitions and extremes, along with their physical understanding, predictability and uncertainty.

Moreover, it welcomes research on dynamical co-evolution, feedbacks and synergies among earth system processes at multiple scales. The session further encourages discussion on mathematical and physical approaches to earth system dynamics, ranging from traditional stochastic-dynamic and information-theoretic formulations to emerging methodologies taking aim at far-from-equilibrium processes in non-ergodic systems.

Contributions are welcome from a diverse community in the broader mathematical and physical geosciences, working with diverse approaches ranging from dynamical modelling to data mining and analysis grounded on fundamental physical principles.

Primary Convener:  Rui A.P. Perdigão, Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien), Institute of Hydraulic Engineering, Vienna, Austria
Convener:  Julia Hall, Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien), Institute of Hydraulic Engineering, Vienna, Austria

Cross-Listed:
  • A - Atmospheric Sciences
  • GC - Global Environmental Change
  • H - Hydrology
Index Terms:

4410 Bifurcations and attractors [NONLINEAR GEOPHYSICS]
4430 Complex systems [NONLINEAR GEOPHYSICS]
4475 Scaling: spatial and temporal [NONLINEAR GEOPHYSICS]
9820 Techniques applicable in three or more fields [GENERAL OR MISCELLANEOUS]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Michael Shaw, USACE-ERDC CRREL, Vicksburg, MS, United States
Nandini Ramesh and Mark A Cane, Columbia University of New York, Palisades, NY, United States
Nikola Jajcay1,2, Sergey Kravtsov3, Anastasios Tsonis3,4 and Milan Palus2, (1)Charles University, Department of Atmospheric Physics, Prague, Czech Republic, (2)Institute of Computer Science, Czech Academy of Sciences, Department of Complex Systems, Prague 8, Czech Republic, (3)University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, United States, (4)Hydrologic Research Center, San Diego, CA, United States
Mahesh Maskey1, Carlos E Puente1 and Bellie Sivakumar2,3, (1)University of California Davis, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, Davis, CA, United States, (2)University of California Davis, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, Davis, CA, United States, (3)University of New South Wales, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sydney, Australia
Hong Jia Chen, National Central University, Department of Earth Science, Taoyuan, Taiwan, Chien-chih Chen, NCU National Central University of Taiwan, Jhongli, Taiwan, Guy Ouillon, Lithophyse, Nice, France and Didier Sornette, ETH Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
Leonard J Pietrafesa, North Carolina State University Raleigh, Raleigh, NC, United States
Erik Vasko, Wright State University Main Campus, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Dayton, OH, United States, Christopher C Barton, Wright State University, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Dayton, OH, United States, Gregory R Geise, Wright State University Main Campus, Fairborn, OH, United States and Mateen M Rizki, Wright State University, Computer Science and Engineering, Dayton, OH, United States
Rui A.P. Perdigão, Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien), Institute of Hydraulic Engineering, Vienna, Austria
Daniel Rothman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, United States