GP009:
Magnetic Mineral Authigenesis and Diagenesis in Sediments





Session ID#: 23430

Session Description:
A multitude of (bio)geochemical processes cause alteration, dissolution and formation of magnetic minerals during burial of marine and lacustrine sediments. Especially microbial and/or abiotic iron reduction and liberation of hydrogen sulfide by sulfate reduction strongly affect the primary magnetic mineral assemblage and thus the preservation of original magnetic properties. Processes, such as deep hot fluid and gas migration and hydrocarbon formation, may lead to magnetic mineral authigenesis and pervasive remagnetizations. Discrimination between “primary” and “secondary” magnetic signal is necessary to not misunderstand environmental changes, paleomagnetic records, changes in provenance, etc…

This session seeks contributions that focus on identifying and assessing the impact of diagenesis on rock magnetic, paleomagnetic and environmental records of sediments. We particularly encourage multidisciplinary contributions that combine magnetic investigations of natural records with geochemical, microbiological data and/or modeling, as well as studies using secondary magnetic signals for e.g. reconstruction of environmental changes. Laboratory experiments are also welcome.

Primary Convener:  Myriam Annie Claire Kars, Center for Advanced Marine Core Research, Nankoku, Japan
Conveners:  Liao Chang, Peking University, School of Earth and Space Sciences, Beijing, China, Susann Henkel, Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research Bremerhaven, Bremerhaven, Germany and Alexandra Abrajevitch, Institute of Tectonics and Geophysics FEB RAS, Khabarovsk, Russia; Ehime University, Matsuyama, Japan
Co-Organized with:
Geomagnetism, Paleomagnetism and Electromagnetism, and Biogeosciences

Cross-Listed:
  • EP - Earth and Planetary Surface Processes
  • MR - Mineral and Rock Physics
  • OS - Ocean Sciences
Index Terms:

0414 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [BIOGEOSCIENCES]
1505 Biogenic magnetic minerals [GEOMAGNETISM AND PALEOMAGNETISM]
1519 Magnetic mineralogy and petrology [GEOMAGNETISM AND PALEOMAGNETISM]
1540 Rock and mineral magnetism [GEOMAGNETISM AND PALEOMAGNETISM]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Robert J Musgrave, University of Sydney, School of Geosciences, Sydney, Australia; Geological Survey of New South Wales, NSW Department of Planning & Environment, Maitland, Australia, Myriam Annie Claire Kars, Center for Advanced Marine Core Research, Nankoku, Japan and Marta E Vega, Geological Survey of New South Wales, NSW Department of Planning & Environment, Maitland, NSW, Australia
Sijibomioluwa Adesope Badejo, Adrian R Muxworthy and Alastair Fraser, Imperial College London, Earth Science and Engineering, London, United Kingdom
Natascha Riedinger, Oklahoma State University Main Campus, Stillwater, OK, United States, Marta E Torres, Oregon State Univ, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States and Evan A Solomon, Univ Washington, Seattle, WA, United States
Myriam Annie Claire Kars, Center for Advanced Marine Core Research, Nankoku, Japan, Susann Henkel, Alfred Wegener Institute, Bremerhaven, Germany and IODP Expedition 370 Scientists
Daniel Rey1, Kais J Mohamed2, Alba Andrade2, Belen Rubio2 and Ana M. Bernabeu2, (1)University of Vigo, Vigo, Spain, (2)Universidad de Vigo, Vigo, Spain
Jennifer Roberts and Richard Douglas Elmore, University of Oklahoma, School of Geology and Geophysics, Norman, OK, United States
Gerhard Heij1, Richard Douglas Elmore2 and Jennifer Roberts2, (1)University of Oklahoma Norman Campus, Norman, OK, United States, (2)University of Oklahoma, School of Geology and Geophysics, Norman, OK, United States
Stacey C Evans1, Matt Hamilton2, Jeffrey Hardwick2, Cory Terrell2 and Richard Douglas Elmore2, (1)Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK, United States, (2)University of Oklahoma, School of Geology and Geophysics, Norman, OK, United States
Andrew P Roberts, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia