B028:
Exploring Plant Genotypic Diversity in Rhizosphere Engineering


Possible Alternate Format: If this session is allocated an oral session, the convener can choose to have lightning style presentations that are quicker and more focused than a traditional session. Learn more


Session ID#: 24474

Session Description:
The rhizosphere is arguably the most complex microbial habitat on earth, comprising an integrated network of plant roots, the soil and diverse microbial consortia. Understanding, predicting and controlling the structure and function of the rhizosphere will allow us to harness rhizosphere activities as a means to increase or restore plant ecosystem services, e.g. crop production and soil carbon storage. Exploring plant genotypic diversity for traits such as carbon allocation, root system architecture and root exudate chemistry will put us in position to define and utilize plant ideotypes for specified outcomes in current or simulated future biogeographical environments. Targeted plant traits can be further enhanced by synthetic biology or transgenic approaches. We invite presentations that highlight studies aimed at improving our understanding of genotypic diversity for plant functional traits and how this knowledge can be exploited in rhizosphere engineering. Focus on model systems, bioenergy cropping systems or native grasslands are welcome.
Primary Convener:  Christer Jansson, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, United States
Convener:  Trent Northen, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, United States

Cross-Listed:
  • GC - Global Environmental Change
Index Terms:

0402 Agricultural systems [BIOGEOSCIENCES]
0428 Carbon cycling [BIOGEOSCIENCES]
0439 Ecosystems, structure and dynamics [BIOGEOSCIENCES]
0476 Plant ecology [BIOGEOSCIENCES]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Cynthia Kallenbach1, Djun Junaidi2,3, Steven Fonte2, Patrick F Byrne2 and Mathew D Wallenstein4, (1)Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, United States, (2)Colorado State University, Soil and Crop Sciences, Fort Collins, CO, United States, (3)Indonesian Rubber Research Institute, Bogor, Indonesia, (4)Colorado State University, Natrual Resource Ecology Lab, Fort Collins, CO, United States
Tamas Varga1, Adriana L. McKinney2, Emma Bingham2, Pubudu P Handakumbura3 and Christer Jansson1, (1)Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, United States, (2)Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, EMSL, Richland, WA, United States, (3)Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Richland, WA, United States
Jennifer Elise Schmidt and Amélie C. M. Gaudin, University of California Davis, Plant Sciences, Davis, CA, United States
Mary Suzanne Lipton, Kim Hixson, Amir H. Ahkami, Pubudu PR HaHandkumbura, Nancy J Hess, Yilin Fang, Daniel Fortin, Bryan Stanfill, Steven Yabusaki, Kristin M Engbrecht, Erin Baker, Ryan Renslow and Christer Jansson, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, United States
Amir H. Ahkami1, Christopher Anderton2, Dušan Veličković2, Gabriel L. Myers1, William Chrisler1, Rodica Lindenmaier1, Yilin Fang3, Steven Yabusaki1, Kim Hixson1, Joshua J Rosnow1, Yuliya Farris1, Nymul E. Khan1, Hans C Bernstein1 and Christer Jansson1, (1)Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, United States, (2)Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Richland, WA, United States, (3)Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, United States

See more of: Biogeosciences