GC046:
Interdependence of Coupled Human and Natural Systems around the World





Session ID#: 24711

Session Description:
Interactions among coupled human and natural systems are increasing in extent and intensity. While distant interactions have long existed, they have increased sharply in recent decades, with the growth in trade, migration, cross-border flows of knowledge and capital. These ‘telecouplings’ have both short- and long-term effects on the natural (e.g., natural ecosystems and their services, land cover, biodiversity) and human (e.g., sociodemographic, economic, cultural) components of coupled systems and their feedbacks. While most research has traditionally targeted coupled systems in isolation, the telecoupling framework seeks to articulate the interactive and synergistic effects among coupled systems, generating new scientific understanding, innovative methodological approaches, and new implications for governance in the presence of globalization. This session features studies using the telecoupling framework to address the growing sustainability challenges facing coupled human and natural systems under globalization.
Primary Convener:  Andrés Viña, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, United States
Convener:  Thomas W Hertel, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, United States
Co-Organized with:
Global Environmental Change, and Global Environmental Change

Cross-Listed:
  • GC - Global Environmental Change
Index Terms:

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

James Edmonds, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, College Park, MD, United States
Noah S Diffenbaugh, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States
Mateus Batistella1, Ramon Felipe Bicudo da Silva2, Jianguo Liu3, Emilio F Moran4, Sara Torres3 and Yue Dou3, (1)Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa), Brasilia, DF, Brazil, (2)UNICAMP State University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil, (3)Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, United States, (4)Michigan State University, Center for Global Change and Earth Observations, East Lansing, MI, United States
Wu Yang, Zimin Ying and Tomás Marín, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China
Andrés Viña1, Ramon Felipe Bicudo da Silva2, Hongbo Yang1 and Jianguo Liu1, (1)Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, United States, (2)UNICAMP State University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
Kaoru Kakinuma1,2, Aki Yanagawa1, Takehiro Sasaki3 and Shinjiro Kanae4, (1)Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Japan, (2)NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY, United States, (3)Yokohama National University, Yokohama, Japan, (4)Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Tokyo, Japan