P018:
If You See Something, Say Something: Exploring the Weird and Wonderful Features of the Solar System


Possible Alternate Format: If this session is allocated an oral session, the convener can choose to have lightning style presentations that are quicker and more focused than a traditional session. Learn more


Session ID#: 24739

Session Description:
Satellite data acquired from NASA and international missions provide a wealth of information about the geologic features of rocky and icy bodies throughout the solar system. Comparing the features observed on these bodies with features on Earth and other Solar System bodies can inspire hypotheses, and yield important insights about how geologic processes operate and differ across bodies.  Sometimes, however, we encounter geologic features on solar system bodies for which we have no ready comparison. This session is aimed at exploring these features in more detail and exposing the wider community to them. Presenters will briefly introduce unexplained observations of geologic/tectonic features to the audience. The session will then allow time for discussion so that the community can bring combined knowledge to better understand the weird and wonderful geologic features throughout the solar system. This session encourages planetary and terrestrially-focused scientists to come together to combine their observations and expertise.
Primary Convener:  Angela M Stickle, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD, United States
Convener:  Lauren Jozwiak, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD, United States

Cross-Listed:
  • C - Cryosphere
  • EP - Earth and Planetary Surface Processes
  • T - Tectonophysics
Index Terms:

5464 Remote sensing [PLANETARY SCIENCES: SOLID SURFACE PLANETS]
5499 General or miscellaneous [PLANETARY SCIENCES: SOLID SURFACE PLANETS]
8149 Planetary tectonics [TECTONOPHYSICS]
8450 Planetary volcanism [VOLCANOLOGY]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Thomas H. S. Harris, Lockheed Martin Corporation, (retired), Arlington, VA, United States
Nathan R Williams1, Shannon M Hibbard1 and Matthew P Golombek2, (1)JPL/NASA/Caltech, Pasadena, CA, United States, (2)JPL, Pasadena, CA, United States
Laura Kerber, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States
Michael E Davias, Cintos.org, Research and Analysis, Stamford, CT, United States and Thomas H. S. Harris, Lockheed Martin Corporation, (retired), Arlington, VA, United States
Sierra Nichole Ferguson1, Alyssa Rhoden1, Michael Nayak2,3 and Erik I Asphaug1, (1)Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, United States, (2)University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, (3)Air Force Research Laboratory, Directed Energy Directorate, Maui, HI, United States
Bradley J Thomson, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, United States
Emily S Martin, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC, United States and D Alex Patthoff, Planetary Science Institute, Pasadena, CA, United States

See more of: Planetary Sciences