PP037:
Spatial and temporal variability of dust emissions and transport: a reference framework from paleodust archives





Session ID#: 25188

Session Description:
Mineral dust is a major component of the global atmospheric aerosol load. Dust emissions are influenced by climate change, and dust, in turn, can affect climate and biogeochemical cycles. Spatial and temporal variability of dust emissions and transport, as well as uncertainties in the particle size distributions and size-dependent physical and chemical properties, render dust an uncertain component of the climate system. Climate archives constitute natural dust samplers, and preserve precious information about past variability in the dust cycle. Under opportune circumstances, climate archives provide us with quantitative reconstructions of dust mass accumulation rates; when paired with additional information, such as measurements of particle size distributions they have a great potential for reconstructing the global dust cycle. We invite contributions aimed at building up a quantitative observational reference framework from paleodust archives, as well as contributions from the modeling community with the potential to constrain and validate Earth System Models.
Primary Convener:  Samuel Albani, CNRS, Gif-sur-Yvette, France
Conveners:  Gisela Winckler, Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY, United States and Denis-Didier Rousseau, CNRS - ENS, LMD, Paris, France
Index Terms:

0305 Aerosols and particles [ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE]
1622 Earth system modeling [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4914 Continental climate records [PALEOCEANOGRAPHY]
4924 Geochemical tracers [PALEOCEANOGRAPHY]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Mehrdad Sardar Abadi and Gerilyn S. Soreghan, School of Geology and Geophysics, Norman, OK, United States
Gilman Ouellette Jr, Louisiana State University, Geography & Anthropology, Baton Rouge, LA, United States
Kassandra Costa1, Jerry F McManus2, Gisela Winckler2, Robert F Anderson3, Jennifer L Middleton4 and Sujoy Mukhopadhyay5, (1)Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY, United States, (2)Columbia U. / LDEO, Palisades, NY, United States, (3)Columbia University & Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY, United States, (4)Harvard University, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Cambridge, MA, United States, (5)Harvard Univ, Cambridge, MA, United States
Christopher T Hayes, University of Southern Mississippi, Stennis Space Center, MS, United States and Davin J. Wallace, University of Southern Mississippi, Marine Science, Stennis Space Center, MS, United States
Alejandra Borunda, Columbia University of New York, Palisades, NY, United States, Gisela Winckler, Columbia U. / LDEO, Palisades, NY, United States, Steven L Goldstein, Columbia University, Palisades, NY, United States, Michael R Kaplan, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY, United States and Paul Travis Vallelonga, Centre for Ice and Climate, Copenhagen, Denmark
Stephanie Arcusa, Cody Routson and Nicholas McKay, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, United States
Amin Mohebbi, Northern Arizona University, Department of Civil Engineering, Construction Management, and Environmental Engineering, Flagstaff, AZ, United States, Hsin-I Chang, Univ of AZ-Atmos Sciences, Tucson, AZ, United States and David Hondula, Arizona State University, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Tempe, AZ, United States
Jordan Abell1,2, Gisela Winckler1,2 and Robert F Anderson1,2, (1)Columbia University of New York, New York, NY, United States, (2)Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY, United States
Sabine Egerer1, Martin Claussen2, Tanja Stanelle3 and Christian H. Reick1, (1)Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany, (2)MPI for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany, (3)ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
Paolo Gabrielli, Ohio State University Main Campus, Columbus, OH, United States and Lonnie G Thompson, Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States