C006:
Applications of Newly Available Enhanced Resolution Satellite Passive Microwave Data





Session ID#: 26212

Session Description:
Earth-gridded satellite passive microwave data have been used to derive geophysical products including sea ice extent, snow cover and snow water equivalent, ocean wind parameters, atmospheric water vapor and soil moisture.  A newly processed NASA MEaSUREs dataset, Calibrated Enhanced-Resolution Brightness Temperature (CETB) ESDR (http://nsidc.org/data/nsidc-0630), provides almost 40 years (from 1978) of enhanced resolution (up to 3.125 km) passive microwave data in addition to conventional 25 km grids.  A new feature of the dataset is the inclusion of all data from each passive microwave instrument processed, which results in extensive periods of time with data from multiple instruments.  We invite presentations on current and potential applications of the CETB data, in particular ones that are expected to be improved or offer new insights, with the availability of higher spatial resolution gridded products consistently processed to cover data collected over a 40-year period.
Primary Convener:  Molly Hardman, National Snow and Ice Data Center, Boulder, CO, United States
Conveners:  Mary J. Brodzik, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO, United States, Joan M Ramage, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA, United States and Barton A Forman, University of Maryland College Park, College Park, MD, United States

Cross-Listed:
  • A - Atmospheric Sciences
  • H - Hydrology
Index Terms:

0736 Snow [CRYOSPHERE]
0738 Ice [CRYOSPHERE]
0740 Snowmelt [CRYOSPHERE]
0758 Remote sensing [CRYOSPHERE]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Youngwook Kim, University of Montana, NTSG, Missoula, MT, United States, Jinyang Du, University of Montana, Numerical Terradynamic Simulation Group, Missoula, MT, United States and John S Kimball, The University of Montana, Numerical Terradynamic Simulation Group, W.A. Franke College of Forestry & Conservation, Missoula, MT, United States
Mitchell Johnson1, Joan M Ramage1, Tara J. Troy1 and Mary J. Brodzik2, (1)Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA, United States, (2)National Snow and Ice Data Center, Boulder, CO, United States
Angela C Bliss, University of Maryland College Park, Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, College Park, MD, United States; NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Cryospheric Sciences Laboratory, Greenbelt, MD, United States
Jinmei Pan1, Michael T Durand1, Lingmei Jiang2 and Desheng Liu3, (1)The Ohio State University, School of Earth Science and Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center, Columbus, OH, United States, (2)Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China, (3)The Ohio State University, Department of Geography, Columbus, OH, United States
Will Norris, Boulder, CO, United States and Carson J. Q. Farmer, Department of Geography, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO, United States
Joan M Ramage1, Mary J. Brodzik2, Molly Hardman3 and Tara J. Troy1, (1)Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA, United States, (2)Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, CO, United States, (3)National Snow and Ice Data Center, Boulder, CO, United States
Molly Hardman, National Snow and Ice Data Center, Boulder, CO, United States, Mary J. Brodzik, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, CO, United States and David G Long, Brigham Young University, Microwave Earth Remote Sensing Laboratory, Provo, UT, United States
Chuan Xiong, Jiancheng Shi and Tianxing Wang, RADI Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
Danika Maria Marzillier, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA, United States and Joan M Ramage, Lehigh Univ, Erwinna, PA, United States

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