H148:
Yesterday is History, The Future is a Mystery: Legacy Effects of Land Use on Water Quality





Session ID#: 26392

Session Description:
To predict how human land use and management affect current and future water quality, it is crucial to understand not only contemporary, but historic human influences on watersheds.  Human activity over decades of urbanization, resource extraction, and intensive agriculture has led to an accumulation of contaminants within the landscape.  These legacies of human use can influence water quality over decadal time scales, with legacy-associated lag times in catchment response presenting unique problems with regard to setting water quality targets.  In this session, we welcome submissions using modeling, data synthesis, and experimental approaches to address legacy effects on water quality.  Examples of relevant topics include long-term effects of forest management and forest fires on stream chemistry, acid mine drainage in watersheds with legacy mines, accumulation of non-point source nitrogen and phosphorus in soils and sediments, and subsurface accumulation of road salts and the resulting salinization of our waterways.
Primary Convener:  Janet Rice Barclay, University of Connecticut, Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, Groton, CT, United States
Conveners:  Ashley M Helton, University of Connecticut, Groton, CT, United States, Kimberly J Van Meter, University of Waterloo, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Waterloo, ON, Canada and Nandita B Basu, University of Waterloo, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Waterloo, ON, Canada
Co-Organized with:
Hydrology, and Biogeosciences

Cross-Listed:
  • B - Biogeosciences
Index Terms:

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Matthew Ascott1, Daren Gooddy2, Lei Wang3, Marianne Stuart2, Melinda Lewis2, Robert Ward3 and Andrew M. Binley4, (1)British Geological Survey Wallingford, Wallingford, United Kingdom, (2)British Geological Survey, Wallingford, United Kingdom, (3)British Geological Survey, Keyworth, United Kingdom, (4)Lancaster University, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster, United Kingdom
Shreeram P Inamdar1, Erin R Johnson2, Richard Douglas Rowland2, Robert C. Walter3 and Dorothy Merritts3, (1)University of Delaware, Newark, DE, United States, (2)University of Delaware, Water Science and Policy, Newark, DE, United States, (3)Franklin and Marshall College, Department of Earth and Environment, and The Water Science Institute, Lancaster, PA, United States
Tuvia Turkeltaub1, Matthew Ascott2, Daren Gooddy3, Xiaoxu Jia4, Ming’an Shao4 and Andrew M. Binley1, (1)Lancaster University, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster, United Kingdom, (2)British Geological Survey Wallingford, Wallingford, United Kingdom, (3)British Geological Survey, Wallingford, United Kingdom, (4)CAS Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Ecosystem Network Observation and Modeling, Beijng, China
Ashley M Helton1, Janet Rice Barclay2 and Chadwick Rittenhouse1, (1)University of Connecticut, Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, Storrs, CT, United States, (2)University of Connecticut, Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, Groton, CT, United States
Anthony J Tesoriero, USGS Oregon Water Science Center, Portland, OR, United States, Paul F Juckem, US Geological Survey, Middleton, WI, United States and Matthew P Miller, USGS Utah Water Science Center, Salt Lake City, UT, United States
Janet Rice Barclay, University of Connecticut, Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, Groton, CT, United States, Ashley M Helton, University of Connecticut, Groton, CT, United States, Martin A Briggs, USGS, Storrs, CT, United States, Jon Jeffrey Starn, USGS, National Water-Quality Assessment, East Hartford, CT, United States and Ann Hunt, USGS Office of Groundwater, Reston, VA, United States
Magdelana Bieroza, SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden and Ann Louise Heathwaite, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster, United Kingdom
Matthew R. V. Ross, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, United States, Fabian Nippgen, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, United States, Brian L McGlynn, Duke University, Nicholas School of the Environment, Durham, NC, United States and Emily S Bernhardt, Duke University, Durham, NC, United States
Sherry L Martin, Anthony D Kendall and David W Hyndman, Michigan State University, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, East Lansing, MI, United States
Sabine Attinger, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research UFZ Halle, Halle, Germany, Meter, Kimberly Van, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada and Nandita B Basu, University of Waterloo, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Waterloo, ON, Canada
Tanya L Gallagher and Sarah E Gergel, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Rona J Donahoe, University of Alabama, Geological Sciences, Tuscaloosa, AL, United States and Patrick Dusty Hawkins, PELA, Inc., Tuscaloosa, AL, United States

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