C039:
The Looming Gap in Microwave Radiometer Coverage and its Potential Impact on Climate Records





Session ID#: 26586

Session Description:
DMSP/SSMI and JAXA/AMSR family of sensors have been, and continue to be, of enormous benefit to the civilian scientific community.  Beginning in 1978 with Nimbus-7, we have an almost 40-year-long climate record, most notably coverage of sea ice in the Arctic and snow on land.   The radiometers operating on F-16 F-17, F-18 and AMSR-2 are well beyond their 5-year design life.  F-19 failed on orbit and F-20 was scrapped. Of concern will be the loss of frequencies below 23Ghz . The sea ice researchers will not be the only ones impacted, the all-weather SST capability of microwave radiometry is critical for observations at high latitudes.  There are no NOAA, NASA, JAXA, or ESA plans for lower frequency PM satellite launches before 2022. This session will focus on: How did we get here? What is the potential impact? What can we do about it? What about Roscosmos, ISRO and the CMA?
Primary Convener:  David W Gallaher, National Snow and Ice Data Center, Boulder, CO, United States
Convener:  Stan Wilson, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO, United States
Co-Organized with:
Cryosphere, Atmospheric Sciences, Biogeosciences, Hydrology, and Ocean Sciences
Index Terms:

0312 Air/sea constituent fluxes [ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE]
0750 Sea ice [CRYOSPHERE]
0794 Instruments and techniques [CRYOSPHERE]
4513 Decadal ocean variability [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

David M. Tratt1, Donald J Boucher Jr.1, Eun-Sung Park1, Steven D Swadley2 and Gene Poe3, (1)Aerospace Corporation El Segundo, El Segundo, CA, United States, (2)Naval Res Lab, Monterey, CA, United States, (3)Science Applications International Corporation - SAIC, Monterey, CA, United States
Frank J Wentz, Marty Brewer, Carl A Mears, Thomas Meissner and Lucrezia Ricciardulli, Remote Sensing Systems, Santa Rosa, CA, United States
Julienne Christine Stroeve, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, United States and Lars Kaleschke, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
W Stanley Wilson, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Visiting Scientist, Baltimore, MD, United States and David W Gallaher, National Snow and Ice Data Center, Boulder, CO, United States
Qifeng Lu1, Shenli WU1, Fangli Dou1, Fenglin Sun1, Heather Lawrence2, Alan Geer2, Stephen English2, Stuart Newman3, William Bell3, Niels Bormann2 and Fabien Carminati3, (1)China Meteorological Administration, Beijing, China, (2)ECMWF, Reading, United Kingdom, (3)UKMO, Exeter, United Kingdom
Bojan R Bojkov, Christophe Accadia, Dieter Klaes, Alessio Canestri and Marc Cohen, EUMETSAT, Darmstadt, Germany
Misako Kachi, Takashi Maeda, Nodoka Ono, Naoya Tomii, Marehito Kasahara, Masaaki Mokuno and Shinichi Sobue, JAXA Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Tsukuba, Japan
Peter Gaiser, Michael H Bettenhausen, Li Li, David Truesdale and Elizabeth Twarog, US Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, United States
Shannon Thomas Brown1, Paolo Focardi2, Amarit Kitiyakara3, Frank Maiwald4, Lance Milligan5, Oliver Montes4, Sharmila Padmanabhan6, Richard Redick4 and Damon Russell6, (1)NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, United States, (2)NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States, (3)Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, United States, (4)Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States, (5)JPL, Pasadena, United States, (6)Jet Propulsion Lab, Pasadena, CA, United States
Gary McWilliams, JPSS Program Office/STC, Lanham, MD, United States, Mitch Goldberg, JPSS Program Office, NOAA/NESDIS, Lanham, MD, United States and Paul Chang, NOAA College Park, College Park, MD, United States
J Scott Stewart and Walter Meier, National Snow and Ice Data Center, Boulder, CO, United States

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