ED013:
Crowdsourcing and the Great American Eclipse of 2017: A new approach for integrating research, technology and education





Session ID#: 26865

Session Description:
The continuous evolution of the solar corona in white light, without the height limitation imposed by coronagraph occulting disks, offers a substantially new view of one of astronomy’s most spectacular phenomena: the corona. This outermost volume of the Sun has great significance for space plasma physics, plasma astrophysics, space weather, education, and outreach. The extensive observations of the 2017 eclipse should mark a milestone in our study of the corona. The focus of this session are the discussion of the different scientific, educational and outreach aspects obtained during the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse by academia, non-profits, industry, and the public. Abstracts describing scientific observations and analysis of the eclipse and related dynamic coronal phenomena; atmospheric and ionospheric observations and analysis, social and educational impact for the communities within the shadow of the eclipse, computational efforts for the analysis of data, crowdsourcing of observations and analysis are welcome.
Primary Convener:  Juan Carlos Martinez Oliveros, Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, United States
Conveners:  Laura M Peticolas, University of California Berkeley, Multiverse, Berkeley, CA, United States, Martin Storksdieck, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States and Calvin Johnson, Google, Making & Science, Mountain View, CA, United States
Co-Organized with:
Education, Atmospheric Sciences, Earth and Space Science Informatics, and Public Affairs

Cross-Listed:
  • A - Atmospheric Sciences
  • IN - Earth and Space Science Informatics
  • PA - Public Affairs
Index Terms:

0845 Instructional tools [EDUCATION]
3399 General or miscellaneous [ATMOSPHERIC PROCESSES]
7509 Corona [SOLAR PHYSICS, ASTROPHYSICS, AND ASTRONOMY]
7594 Instruments and techniques [SOLAR PHYSICS, ASTROPHYSICS, AND ASTRONOMY]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Hugh S Hudson1, Mark Bender2, Braxton L Collier3, Calvin Johnson4, Justin Koh5, David Konerding5, Juan Carlos Martinez Oliveros6, Laura M Peticolas6, Vivian White7 and Daniel Zevin8, (1)University of California Berkeley, Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, United States, (2)Eclipse Across America, San Antonio, TX, United States, (3)Ideum, Inc., Albuquerque NM, United States, (4)Google, Boston, MA, United States, (5)Google, Making & Science, Mountain View, CA, United States, (6)Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, United States, (7)Astronomical Society of the Pacific, San Francisco, CA, United States, (8)University of California Berkeley, Multiverse, Berkeley, CA, United States
Cynthia Hall1,2, Cassandra R Runyon1 and Maria L. Royle3, (1)College of Charleston, Charleston, SC, United States, (2)Lowcountry Hall of Science & Mathematics, Charleston, SC, United States, (3)Stall High School, English to Speakers of Other Languages, North Charleston, SC, United States
Calvin Johnson1, Justin Koh2, David Konerding2, Laura M Peticolas3, Hugh S Hudson3, Juan Carlos Martinez Oliveros3 and Daniel Zevin4, (1)Google, Boston, MA, United States, (2)Google, Making & Science, Mountain View, CA, United States, (3)Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, United States, (4)University of California Berkeley, Multiverse, Berkeley, CA, United States
Kristen Linn Kopp Weaver1, Holli Riebeek Kohl1 and GLOBE Observer Team/NASA Earth Science Education Collaborative, (1)Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Lanham, MD, United States
Michael Hirsch, SciVision, Inc., Boston, MA, United States and Nathaniel A Frissell, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research - Physics, Newark, NJ, United States