OS001:
Advances in monitoring and modeling of subsea permafrost



Session ID#: 48725

Session Description:
Rise in relative sea level since the late Pleistocene has submerged permafrost-bearing coastal zones in the Arctic and subjected them to temperature induced degradation. The submerged relict subsea permafrost is climatically unstable and has the potential to release methane gas into the atmosphere due to its stored organic carbon and destabilization of any associated gas hydrates. Knowledge of the extent of subsea permafrost and the processes affecting its degradation are important for climate change predictions and planning engineering activities in the Arctic. Recent modeling studies and observations indicate that our understanding of subsea permafrost is incomplete. This session seeks current contributions to our understanding of subsea permafrost systems, associated gas hydrate deposits, and greenhouse gases in shallow arctic waters. This session invites contributions from all techniques including numerical models, observations using remote sensing or geophysical techniques, measurements of gas concentrations, seabed morphology, paleoclimate, and climatic projections including permafrost degradation.
Primary Conveners:  Dallas Sherman, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics La Jolla, La Jolla, CA, United States
Conveners:  Jennifer Frederick, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, United States and Benjamin W Abbott, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, United States
Primary Liaisons:  Dallas Sherman, IGPP/SIO/UCSD, San Diego, CA, United States

Cross-Listed:
  • C - Cryosphere
Index Terms:

0702 Permafrost [CRYOSPHERE]
3004 Gas and hydrate systems [MARINE GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS]
3305 Climate change and variability [ATMOSPHERIC PROCESSES]

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Brett F Thornton1, John Prytherch2, Marc C. Geibel3, Kristian Andersson3, Ian M Brooks4, Michael K H Tjernstrom5, Christoph Humborg6, Dominic Salisbury4 and Patrick M Crill3, (1)Stockholm University, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden, (2)Stockholm University, Department of Meteorology, Stockholm, Sweden, (3)Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden, (4)University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom, (5)Stockholm University, Dept. of Meteorology, Stockholm, Sweden, (6)Stockholm University, Baltic Sea Centre, Stockholm, Sweden
Sebastian Westermann1, Michael Angelopolous2, Thomas Schneider von Deimling3, Frederieke Miesner2, Mikhail Grigoriev4, Bennet Juhls5, Hugues Lantuit2 and Pier Paul Overduin6, (1)University of Oslo, Department of Geosciences, Oslo, Norway, (2)Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany, (3)Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research Potsdam, Permafrost Research, Potsdam, Germany, (4)Melnikov Permafrost Institute SB RAS, Yakutsk, Russia, (5)Institute for Space Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Freie Universität Berlin, Carl-Heinrich-Becker-Weg 6–10, Berlin, Germany, (6)Alfred Wegener Institute Hemlholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam, Germany, Potsdam, Germany
Sayedeh Sara Sayedi, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, United States, Benjamin Abbott, Brigham Young University, Department of Plant and Wildlife Science, Provo, United States, Jennifer M Frederick, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, United States, Brett Thornton, Stockholm University, Department of Geological Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden, Jorien Vonk, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands, Amsterdam, Netherlands, Pier Paul Overduin, Alfred Wegener Institute Hemlholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam, Germany, Potsdam, Germany, Tingjun Zhang, Key Laboratory of West China's Environment (DOE), College of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, 730000, CHINA, Lanzhou, China, Elchin E Jafarov, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, USA, Boulder, CO, United States, Kevin M Schaefer, National Snow and Ice Data Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, U.S.A, Boulder, CO, United States and Subsea Permafrost Working Group, A working group of the Permafrost Carbon Network, Alaska, United States

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