ME24E:
Pelagic Tunicates: Interactions with the Lower Food Web, Higher Trophic Levels, and Effects on Biogeochemistry II Posters

Session ID#: 85090

Session Description:
Pelagic tunicates can play substantial roles in shaping and modifying material fluxes, trophic interactions, recycling, and export processes within the oceanic environment.  Salps can enhance carbon export via the production of fast-sinking fecal pellets, appendicularians contribute to the production of marine snow through discarded houses, and pyrosomes can occupy distinct niches within the water column and enhance carbon transport via vertical migration.  All organisms are capable of extremely high growth and grazing rates, such that when they bloom they significantly alter trophic interactions and biogeochemical fluxes.  This session is timely as abundances of salps and pyrosomes are reported to be increasing in certain regions of the ocean.  Studies focusing on the interactions between these organisms and the lower trophic levels are especially needed to understand the underlying causes of changing abundances, and to quantify bloom effects on phytoplankton growth and grazing, bacterial remineralization, and biogeochemistry.  Pelagic tunicates also have different predators compared to crustacean zooplankton, and the lack of quantitative information on these trophic interactions precludes their inclusion into large-scale food-web models.  In this session, we welcome presentations that investigate pelagic tunicates and their interactions with the lower food-web, as well as their effects on higher trophic levels, bacterial processes, carbon export, and nutrient dynamics, at all scales.
Index Terms:

1615 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4817 Food webs, structure, and dynamics [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4840 Microbiology and microbial ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4890 Zooplankton [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Moira Décima, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand
Co-chairs:  Michael R Stukel, Florida State University, Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science, Tallahassee, FL, United States, Andres Gutierrez-Rodriguez, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, New Zealand, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand and Scott Nodder, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Wellington, New Zealand
Primary Liaison:  Moira Décima, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand
Moderators:  Michael R Stukel, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, United States, Andres Gutierrez-Rodriguez, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, New Zealand, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand and Moira Décima, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Scott Nodder, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Wellington, New Zealand and Moira Décima, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
Biology of Salpa thompsoni at the Chatham Rise, New Zealand: Reproduction, diel vertical migration and demography (644642)
Florian Lüskow, University of British Columbia, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Vancouver, BC, Canada, Evgeny A Pakhomov, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, University of British Columbia, Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Vancouver, BC, Canada and Moira Décima, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand
 
Changing competitive interactions between salps and protistan grazers during salp bloom evolution (654083)
Michael R Stukel, Florida State University, Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science, Tallahassee, FL, United States, Moira Décima, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand, Karen E Selph, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, Andres Gutierrez-Rodriguez, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, New Zealand, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand and Natalie Yingling, Florida State University, Tallahassee, United States
 
Elevated particle export fluxes facilitated by salps, east of New Zealand (641117)
Scott D Nodder1, Michael R Stukel2, Thomas Bryce Kelly3, Moira Décima4, Andres Gutierrez-Rodriguez5, Sarah Searson6 and Stacy Deppeler4, (1)National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand, (2)Florida State University, Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science, Tallahassee, FL, United States, (3)Florida State University, Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science, Tallahassee, FL, United States, (4)National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand, (5)National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, New Zealand, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand, (6)National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Ocean Physics, Wellington, New Zealand
 
Salp distribution in coastal, subtropical, and subantarctic waters off the Southeast coast of New Zealand: linking hydrology with ecosystem function (653633)
Morgan Meyers, University of Otago, Department of Botany, Dunedin, New Zealand, Moira Décima, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Marine Biogeochemistry, Wellington, New Zealand, Kim Irene Currie, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Wellington, New Zealand, Linn Hoffmann, University of Otago, Department of Botany, New Zealand and Steve Wing, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
 
Distribution, abundance and population demographics of Salpa thompsoni on the Kerguelen Plateau (648677)
Natasha Henschke, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, Stéphane Blain, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, Laboratoire d'Océanographie Microbienne (LOMIC), Observatoire Océanologique, Banyuls sur mer, France, Yves Cherel, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé, Villiers en Bois, France, Cédric Cotté, LOCEAN, Sorbonne Universités (UPMC, Univ Paris 06)-CNRS-IRD-MNHN, Paris, France, Boris Espinasse, University of Nordland, Faculty of Biosciences and Aquaculture / Marine Ecology Group, Postboks 1490 8049 Bodø, Norway, Brian Hunt, University of British Columbia, Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, Vancouver, BC, Canada and Evgeny A Pakhomov, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, University of British Columbia, Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Vancouver, BC, Canada
 
New insides into ecology of the Antarctic tunicate Salpa thompsoni: ingestion, growth and development dynamics (649708)
Evgeny A Pakhomov1,2, Morten Iversen3, Clara Maria Flintrop4,5, Nora-Charlotte Pauli3,6, Larysa Pakhomova7, Wiebke Wessels6 and Bettina Meyer3,6, (1)Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, University of British Columbia, Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Vancouver, BC, Canada, (2)Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, University of British Columbia, Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Vancouver, BC, Canada, (3)Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research Bremerhaven, Bremerhaven, Germany, (4)Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, SeaPump, Am Handelshafen 12, 27570 Bremerhaven, Germany, (5)MARUM - University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany, (6)Carl-von-Ossietzky University Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany, (7)Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmosperic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
 
Feeding dynamics of Salpa thompsoni and Euphausia superba in the Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) region (636654)
Nora-Charlotte Pauli1,2, Martin Graeve1, Morten H. Iversen1,3, Evgeny A Pakhomov4,5, Katja Metfies6,7 and Bettina Meyer1,2, (1)Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research Bremerhaven, Bremerhaven, Germany, (2)Carl-von-Ossietzky University Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany, (3)MARUM - University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany, (4)Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, University of British Columbia, Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Vancouver, BC, Canada, (5)Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, University of British Columbia, Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Vancouver, BC, Canada, (6)Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany, (7)Helmholtz Institute for Functional Marine Biodiversity, Oldenburg, Germany
 
Krill vs salps: dominance shift from krill to salps is associated with higher dissolved N:P ratios (652633)
Christoph Plum, Philipp M. Wenta, Dominik Bahlburg and Stefanie Devi Moorthi, University of Oldenburg, Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment, Wilhelmshaven, Germany
 
From the Origin of Feces - The Impact of Krill and Salp Fecal Pellets on Iron Chemistry and Iron Bioavailability to Southern Ocean Phytoplankton (637110)
Sebastian Böckmann1, Florian Koch2, Franziska Pausch3, Anna Pagnone4, Dorothee Wilhelms-Dick3, Luis M. Laglera5, Camila Sukekava6, Bettina Meyer7 and Scarlett Trimborn3, (1)University of Bremen, Bibliotheksstraße 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany, (2)Hochschule Bremerhaven, An der Karlstadt 8, 27568 Bremerhaven, Germany, (3)Alfred Wegener Institut Helmholtz Zentrum für Polar und Meeresforschung, Am Handelshafen 12, 27570 Bremerhaven, Germany, (4)Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany, (5)University of the Balearic Islands, Departamento de Química, 07122 Palma, Spain, (6)Federal University of Rio Grande. Av. Itália, km 8, Rio Grande, Rio grande do Sul, Brazil, (7)Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research Bremerhaven, Bremerhaven, Germany
 
In Situ Analysis of Appendicularian Distribution in Relation to Planktonic Biomass and Community Composition (653792)
Alexis C Hagemeyer1,2, Adam T Greer3, Bradley Penta4 and John C Lehrter1,5, (1)Dauphin Island Sea Lab, Dauphin Island, AL, United States, (2)University of South Alabama, Marine Sciences, Mobile, AL, United States, (3)The University of Southern Mississippi, Division of Marine Science, Stennis Space Center, MS, United States, (4)Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center, MS, United States, (5)University of South Alabama / Dauphin Island Sea Lab, Dauphin Island, AL, United States
 
Revisiting the Trophic Role of Doliolids. Are Doliolids Detritivores? (638984)
Marc Emil Frischer, University of Georgia, Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Savannah, GA, United States, Tina L Walters, University of Georgia Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Savannah, GA, United States, Deidre Michelle Gibson, Hampton University, Hampton, VA, United States, Erin Arneson, Georgia Southern University, Biology, Statesboro, United States, Lulu E Lacy, University of Georgia, Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Savannah, United States, Lauren M Lamboley, Savannah State University, Marine Sciences, Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Savannah, GA, United States and Jay Brandes, University of Georgia, Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Department of Marine Sciences, Savannah, GA, United States
 
Impact of Pyrosoma antlanticum on the Microbial Loop: Results from Flow Cytometry and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing (647218)
Carey Sweeney1, Beatrice Pickett1, Kelly Sutherland2 and Anne Thompson3, (1)Portland State University, Portland, OR, United States, (2)University of Oregon, Oregon Institute of Marine Biology, Eugene, OR, United States, (3)Portland State University, Biology, Portland, OR, United States
 
Resolving Pyrosome Prey Consumption Through Gut Content Analysis (639741)
Anna Ward1, Anne Thompson2 and Kelly Sutherland1, (1)University of Oregon, Oregon Institute of Marine Biology, Eugene, OR, United States, (2)Portland State University, Biology, Portland, OR, United States
 
The waxing and waning of a bloom of pyrosomes, Pyrosoma atlanticum, in the southern California Current System, 2014-2019 (647083)
Eliya M Baron Lopez1,2, Linsey M Sala2 and Mark D Ohman2, (1)University of Rhode Island, Department of Marine Affairs, Kingston, RI, United States, (2)University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
 
Vertical Distribution of the Pyrosome Pyrosoma atlanticum off the US West Coast from Camera Profiles and Depth-Stratified Net Tows (648344)
Joanna Lyle1, Robert Cowen2, Su Sponaugle3 and Kelly Sutherland1, (1)University of Oregon, Oregon Institute of Marine Biology, Eugene, OR, United States, (2)Oregon State University, Hatfield Marine Science Center, Newport, OR, United States, (3)Oregon State University, Department of Integrative Biology, Corvallis, OR, United States
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