IS44A:
Innovation in in Situ Instrumentation, Sensors, and Observation Networks to Advance High-Resolution Data Collection and Biogeochemical Insight in Marine Ecosystems IV Posters

Session ID#: 85245

Session Description:
Complex interactions of physical, biological, and chemical parameters affect coastal marine ecosystems over a variety of scales, highlighting the need to conduct observations at spatial and temporal resolution relevant to informing understanding of system processes (e.g., biogeochemical cycling) and implications for human-ecosystem interactions (e.g., fishery health, coastal flooding hazards, ocean acidification). Rapidly advancing miniaturization, networking, and lower power demands are driving innovative capabilities for in-situ sensors and instrumentation, particularly those that enable collection of data at higher frequencies or deployment of larger number of sensors for spatial coverage. Sharing both successes and challenges is critical to enable insights to be harnessed across oceanographic disciplines. This session welcomes scientists and engineers of all flavors to discuss recent advances in in-situ sensors and instrumentation technologies, in-situ sensor network design, unique sensor deployment strategies, data analysis techniques applied to high-resolution sensor data, and in-situ system validation mechanisms. This session is intended to be highly interdisciplinary and welcomes sensing projects in biogeochemical, biological, chemical, and/or physical characteristics of marine systems, particularly those highlighting success in and methods for real-time data collection and for drastically increasing the resolution of collected we are able to collect to characterize estuarine, coastal, and near-shore environments.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • CP - Coastal and Estuarine Processes
  • NC - Nutrient Cycling
  • OB - Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry
Index Terms:

4805 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4806 Carbon cycling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4845 Nutrients and nutrient cycling [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4894 Instruments, sensors, and techniques [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
Primary Chair:  Amy V Mueller, Northeastern University, Civil & Env Engineering / Marine & Env Science, Boston, MA, United States
Co-chairs:  Aleck Zhaohui Wang, Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Anna PM Michel, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Applied Ocean Physics & Engineering, Woods Hole, MA, United States and Brian T Glazer, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, United States
Primary Liaison:  Anna PM Michel, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Applied Ocean Physics & Engineering, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Moderators:  Aleck Zhaohui Wang, Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States and Anna PM Michel, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Applied Ocean Physics & Engineering, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Brian T Glazer, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
Comparison of HPLC Derived Phytoplankton Pigments from Autonomously Collected Samples and CTD Methods to Evaluate the Integration of Autonomous Vehicles as Platforms for Enhancing Ocean Time-series Programs. (653942)
Claire Medley1, John A Breier Jr2, Michael Jakuba3, Eric W Chan2, Rodney J Johnson1, Matthew R McIlvin3, Quinn Wright Montgomery4, Paloma Lopez5 and Mak A Saito3, (1)Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, BATS, St.George's, Bermuda, (2)University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, TX, United States, (3)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (4)Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, BATS, St. Georges, Bermuda, (5)Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, St.George's, Bermuda
 
Autonomous Total Alkalinity and pH Measurements on a Barrier Reef of Kāneʻohe Bay (642394)
Ellen Briggs1, Todd R Martz1, Eric Heinen De Carlo2, Christopher Sabine3 and Noah Howins4, (1)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)Univ Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, United States, (3)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, United States, (4)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, United States
 
pOCO – the Tunable Laser Diode Absorption Spectroscopy (TLDAS)-based pCO2 Instrument (Invited) (647885)
Beckett Colson and Anna Michel, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering, Woods Hole, MA, United States
 
Acoustic Monitoring Across the Oceanographic Front Between the Tsugaru Warm and Oyashio Currents (638976)
Zhen LU, Daisuke Hasegawa, Takahiro Tanaka, David Mark Spencer, Yuji Okazaki and Takeshi Okunishi, Tohoku National Fisheries Research Institute, Japan Fisheries Research and Education Agency, Shiogama, Japan
 
An Undulating Towed Array (UTA) for high-resolution observations of the upper ocean (638871)
David Mark Spencer, Daisuke Hasegawa, Takahiro Tanaka, Zhen LU, Yuji Okazaki and Takeshi Okunishi, Tohoku National Fisheries Research Institute, Japan Fisheries Research and Education Agency, Shiogama, Japan
 
Evaluation of angle of attack of underwater glider using an electromagnetic current sensor and ADCP (641128)
Takahiro Tanaka1, Daisuke Hasegawa1, Takeshi Okunishi1, Ichiro Yasuda2 and Pat Welch3, (1)Tohoku National Fisheries Research Institute, Japan Fisheries Research and Education Agency, Shiogama, Japan, (2)Atmosphere Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Japan, (3)Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States
 
Expanding operational ocean-observing capabilities with gliders across the Macaronesia region (641356)
Carlos Barrera1, Tania Morales1, Rayco Moran1, Eduardo Caudet1, Rubén Marrero1, Andres Cianca1, Daniel Alcaraz1, Francisco Campuzano2, Carlos Fernandes3, Joao Tasso Borges de Sousa4, Maria Jose Rueda1 and Octavio Llinas1, (1)Oceanic Platform of the Canary Islands, Telde, Spain, (2)Técnico Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal, (3)Instituto Hidrografico, Oceanography Division, Lisboa, Portugal, (4)University of Porto, LSTS, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering (FEUP), Porto, Portugal
 
Using Sensors on Biogeochemical APEX Profiling Floats: Pre-deployment Characterization and Calibration of MBARI Built Deep-Sea-Durafet pH and ISUS NO3 Sensors (648547)
Peter M Walz, Carole M Sakamoto, Luke Coletti, Yuichiro Takeshita and Kenneth S Johnson, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States
 
Improving path-planning for glider operations: A current-forecast based approach applied in the Gulf of St. Lawrence (639323)
Nicolai von Oppeln-Bronikowski, Memorial University, Physics and Physical Oceanography, St. John's, NF, Canada, Mingxi Zhou, University of Rhode Island Narragansett Bay, Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States and Brad DeYoung, Memorial University, Physics and Physical Oceanography, St John's, NF, Canada
 
Comparison of Sentinel-3a/SLSTR derived SST with MAERI Measurements (641848)
Bingkun Luo1, Peter J Minnett2, Goshka Szczodrak2, Katherine Ann Kilpatrick3 and Miguel Izaguirre2, (1)University of Miami, RSMAS, Meteorology and Physical Oceanography, Miami, FL, United States, (2)University of Miami, Rosenstiel School of Marine, Atmospheric, and Earth Science, Department of Ocean Sciences, Miami, United States, (3)University of Miami, RSMAS, Department of Ocean Sciences, Miami, FL, United States
 
OBSERVA.PT and OBSERVA.FISH: Autonomous Observing Systems to Support of Marine Ecosystem Management in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean (640266)
Antonio Miguel P A Santos, Instituto Português do Mar e da Atmosfera, Lisboa, Portugal; IPMA-Portuguese Institute for the Oceans and Atmosphere/CCMAR-Center of Marine Sciences Univ. Algarve, Department of the Ocean and Marine Resources (DMRM), Lisbon, Portugal, Carlos Guedes Soares, CENTEC- Centre for Marine Technology and Ocean Engineering/IST-ID, Lisboa, Portugal, Anabela J. Carvalho, IPMA-Portuguese Institute for the Ocean and Atmosphere, Department of Meteorology and Geophysics (DMG), Lisboa, Portugal, Isabel Sousa Pinto, University of Porto, CIIMAR, Porto, Portugal and Antonio C. Oliveira, Transinsular-Transportes Marítimos Insulares, S.A. (Grupo E.T.E.), Lisboa, Portugal
 
New Tools for OOI Surface Profiler Data Delivery and Visualization (653062)
Ian Black, Jonathan P Fram and Craig M Risien, Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States
 
Current Measurement Showdown: Workhorse 300 vs Signature 55 vs MAVS (657677)
Daniel J Torres1, Kurt L Polzin2, Susan Wjiffels1, Gunnar Voet3, Matthew Alford3 and Brian Hogue4, (1)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (2)WHOI, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (3)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (4)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, United States
 
Engineering validation of a novel trace metal clean sampler for profiling and mobile deployment in pressure chamber tests (642634)
Amy V Mueller, Northeastern University, Civil & Env Engineering / Marine & Env Science, Boston, MA, United States, John Crusius, USGS at U Washington, Seattle, WA, United States and Fizzah Shaikh, Northeastern University, Boston, United States
 
Glider and profiling float CTD dynamic performance and correction algorithms through a strong thermocline (656159)
Mark Halverson, Jean-Michel Leconte and Greg Johnson, RBR Ltd, Ottawa, ON, Canada
 
Motion Characterization and Correction of Fine-scale Velocity Measurement on Wirewalker (648803)
Bofu Zheng1, Andrew J. Lucas1 and Robert Pinkel2, (1)University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)Univ California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States
 
Merging in-situ and Discrete Sampling with Bioinformatics to Determine Cross-Reactivity of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. probes during Environmental Sample Processor Deployments in the Gulf of Maine (646558)
Analise Wittenberg1, Anna Farrell2, Katherine Hubbard3,4, Christina Chadwick3, Bruce Keafer4, Donald M Anderson4, Joel H. Graber2 and Jane Disney2, (1)College of the Atlantic, Bar Harbor, ME, United States, (2)MDI Biological Laboratory, Salisbury Cove, ME, United States, (3)Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, St. Petersburg, FL, United States, (4)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States
 
AUTOHOLO: A novel, in situ, autonomous holographic imaging system for long-term particle and plankton characterization studies in diverse marine environments (655795)
Aditya R Nayak1,2, Malcolm McFarland1, James Michael Sullivan1, Fraser Dalgleish1 and Lysel Garavelli3, (1)Florida Atlantic University, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Fort Pierce, FL, United States, (2)Florida Atlantic University, Ocean and Mechanical Engineering, Boca Raton, FL, United States, (3)Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States
 
PhRePhOx — an in-situ approach to quantifying carbon cycling processes (645051)
Solomon Chen1, Collin P Ward2, Aleck Zhaohui Wang3 and Matthew Herman Long2, (1)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, United States, (2)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (3)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole, United States
 
Long-term stability of salinity measurements by autonomous observing systems with RBR inductive conductivity sensors (654888)
Nikolay Nezlin, Mark Halverson, Jean-Michel Leconte, Eric Siegel, Igor Shkvorets and Greg Johnson, RBR Ltd, Ottawa, ON, Canada
 
Assessment of RBRcoda T.ODO performance on long-term deployment and profiling in Bedford Basin (643923)
Rui Zhang1, Clark Richards2, Mark Halverson1, Jon Taylor1, Eric Siegel1 and Greg Johnson1, (1)RBR Ltd, Ottawa, ON, Canada, (2)Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Halifax, NS, Canada
 
Development and Validation of a Deep-Sea Chemiluminescent Sensor for Measuring Reactive Intermediates (651832)
Lina Taenzer1, Kalina C Grabb1, Jason Kapit2, Scott D. Wankel3, William Pardis4 and Colleen Hansel5, (1)Massachusetts Institute of Technology, EAPS, Cambridge, MA, United States, (2)WHOI, Department of Applied Ocean Physics & Engineering, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (3)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Marine Chemistry & Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (4)WHOI, Department of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering, Woods Hole, United States, (5)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States
 
Indicator impurity corrections for accurate spectrophotometric pH measurements (644378)
Michael B Fong, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States and Andrew G Dickson, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, La Jolla, CA, United States
 
Field Performance of an ISFET based Profiling pH Sensor (651992)
Charles William Branham1, Vladislav Simontov1, Yuichiro Takeshita2 and David J Murphy1, (1)Sea-Bird Scientific, R&D, Bellevue, WA, United States, (2)Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States
 
Ultra-low-cost optical pH sensors for high-density and community-assisted coastal/estuarine monitoring (652823)
Francis J Sansone, Univ Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, United States
 
Low-cost Hyperspectral Handheld Radiometer System for Improved Spatial and Temporal Water Quality Monitoring (654580)
Karl Bosse1, Robert A Shuchman1, Michael Sayers1 and Reid Sawtell2, (1)Michigan Tech Research Inst, Ann Arbor, MI, United States, (2)Michigan Tech Research Inst, Ann Arbor, United States
 
Sampling errors arising from carousel entrainment and insufficient flushing of oceanographic sampling bottles. (636418)
Chris R Paver, NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service, Silver Spring, MD, United States, Louis A Codispoti, University of Maryland, UMCES, Cambridge, MD, United States, Victoria Coles, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Horn Point Laboratory, Cambridge, MD, United States and Lee Cooper, Univ MD Center Enviro Science, Solomons, MD, United States