OB34A:
Biological Hot Spots in the Deep Sea: Natural Variability and Adaptation to Changing Oceans II Posters

Session ID#: 85248

Session Description:
The deep-sea is often considered as the last wilderness on earth and provides habitat to many vulnerable and often unexplored ecosystems. These ecosystems support high species biodiversity and biomass, and provide goods and services that are vital for the health and wellbeing of our planet. Ecosystems such as cold-water coral and sponge reefs not only support a great diversity of life, but are also seriously affected by human activities and climate change. Biogeochemical dynamics, distribution, interconnections and adaptation of these ecosystems to anthropogenic change are key values to understand ecosystem functioning through time and make predictions for the future. This session will focus on benthic biological hotspot ecosystems in the deep sea, including seamounts, submarine canyons and continental slopes. Presenters are encouraged from different fields studying biogeographic patterns, biodiversity (macro to microscale), biogeochemistry, oceanography, paleoclimatological characteristics, and stressors of these fragile ecosystems.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
  • PC - Past, Present and Future Climate
  • PI - Physical-Biological Interactions
Index Terms:
Primary Chair:  Furu Mienis, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Den Burg, Netherlands
Co-chairs:  Hans Tore Rapp, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway, Andrew J Davies, University of Rhode Island, Bangor, United Kingdom and , University of Amsterdam, Freshwater and marine ecology, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Primary Liaison:  Furu Mienis, NIOZ, Den Burg, Netherlands
Moderators:  Furu Mienis, NIOZ, Den Burg, Netherlands and Andrew J Davies, University of Rhode Island, Bangor, United Kingdom
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Furu Mienis, NIOZ, Den Burg, Netherlands

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
A role for predation in mediating the population dynamics of deep-sea corals? (657780)
James Barry1, Charles A. Boch1, Kurt Randall Buck1, Erica J Burton2, Andrew P DeVogelaere2, Amanda S Kahn3, Chad King4, Linda Kuhnz1, Steven Yitzchak Litvin1, Chris Lovera1, Thomas P Guilderson5 and Patrick Whaling1, (1)Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States, (2)National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, Monterey, CA, United States, (3)Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, Moss Landing, CA, United States, (4)Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary - NOAA, Monterey, CA, United States, (5)LLNL, Livermore, CA, United States
 
Forests of the Deep: High-density deep-sea coral and sponge communities in the Central and Western Pacific (645852)
Thomas F. Hourigan1, Christopher Kelley2, Robert McGuinn3, Sarah Bingo4, Virginia C Moriwake4, Meagan Putts4, Michael Francis Parke5 and Kelley Elliott6, (1)NOAA Habitat Conservation, Silver Spring, MD, United States, (2)University of Hawaii, Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory, Honolulu, HI, United States, (3)NOAA, Northern Gulf Institute, Charleston, SC, United States, (4)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, (5)NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, Honolulu, HI, United States, (6)NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Silver Spring, MD, United States
 
Infaunal Communities Associated with Deep-Sea Coral Habitats in the Western Atlantic (Invited) (651360)
Jill R Bourque, US Geological Survey Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, Gainesville, FL, United States, Amanda W Demopoulos, US Geological Survey, Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, Gainesville, FL, United States, Jonathan Quigley, Cherokee Nation Technologies, Contracted to USGS Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, Gainesville, FL, United States, Jason D Chaytor, USGS Coastal and Marine Science Center Woods Hole, Woods Hole, MA, United States and Erik E Cordes, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States
 
Assessing deep-sea marine metazoan and bacterial community structure in cold-seep, canyon, and cold-water coral reef habitats using high-throughput sequencing of DNA extracted from water samples (653723)
Aaron Aunins1, Cheryl Morrison1 and Christina Kellogg2, (1)USGS Leetown Science Center, Kearneysville, WV, United States, (2)USGS Saint Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, Saint Petersburg, FL, United States
 
Changes in bacterial communities inhabiting massive sulfide deposits on the Juan de Fuca Ridge across a ~10 My transects. (646859)
Adam Ziegler, Stonehill College, Chemistry, North Easton, MA, United States
 
Environmental DNA surveys of metazoan diversity across seamounts and abyssal plains in the western Clarion Clipperton Zone (648333)
Erica Goetze1, Olivier Laroche1, Oliver Kersten2 and Craig R Smith1, (1)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, (2)University of Oslo, Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Oslo, Norway
 
Microbial communities of the deep seafloor sediment and manganese nodules from the Clarion-Clipperton Zone of the Eastern Pacific Ocean (645686)
Julia M. Otte, Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research Bremerhaven, Bremerhaven, Germany; Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
 
Kuroshio flow – seamount interaction effects on the spatial and temporal variability of the microbial community structure (642748)
Cristy Acabado, University of the Philippines Visayas, College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, Iloilo, Philippines; NTNU National Taiwan Normal University, Life Science, Taipei, Taiwan, Chung-Chi Chen, NTNU National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan and Ming-Huei Chang, National Taiwan University, Institute of Oceanography, Taipei, Taiwan
 
Whittard Canyon: a pathway and sink for organic carbon (651092)
Furu Mienis, Sofia Ledin, Marc Lavaleye and Gerard Duineveld, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Den Burg, Netherlands
 
Environmental factors drive megabenthic faunal distributions patterns on the East and West wall of Whittard Canyon (651741)
Sofia Ledin1, Gerard Duineveld1, Marc Lavaleye1, Gert-Jan Reichart2,3 and Furu Mienis1, (1)Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Den Burg, Netherlands, (2)NIOZ, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Department of Ocean Systems, and Utrecht University, Fac Geosci, Dept Earth Sci, Texel, Netherlands, (3)Utrecht University, Fac Geosci, Dept Earth Sci, Utrecht, Netherlands
 
Exploring the impact of historic shipwrecks on microbial biogeography and sediment geochemistry in the deep Gulf of Mexico. (640557)
Justyna J Hampel1, Rachel L Mugge2, Rachel Moseley3, Anirban Ray2 and Leila J Hamdan2, (1)University of Southern Mississippi, Ocean Springs, United States, (2)University of Southern Mississippi, Ocean Springs, MS, United States, (3)University of Southern Mississippi, United States
 
How shipwrecks shape microbial biodiversity and biogeography across deep-sea sediments (655899)
Leila J Hamdan1, Justyna J Hampel2, Rachel Moseley3, Rachel L Mugge4, Anirban Ray4, Taylor Runyan Lee5 and Warren T Wood6, (1)University of Southern Mississippi, School of Ocean Science and Engineering, Ocean Springs, MS, United States, (2)University of Southern Mississippi, Ocean Springs, United States, (3)University of Southern Mississippi, United States, (4)University of Southern Mississippi, Ocean Springs, MS, United States, (5)US Naval Research Laboratory, Ocean Sciences Division, Stennis Space Center, United States, (6)US Naval Research Laboratory, Ocean Sciences Division, Stennis Space Center, MS, United States
 
Fine-Scale Natural Variability of Community Distribution on a Low Temperature Discharge Outcrop of a Ridge Flank Hydrothermal System (651713)
Anne Marie Hartwell, University of New Hampshire Main Campus, Earth Sciences, Durham, NH, United States and Jennifer Dijkstra, University of New Hampshire Main Campus, Durham, NH, United States
 
Why can nematode-prokaryotic symbioses be associated with deep-sea hotspots? (646532)
Jeroen Ingels, Florida State University, St. Teresa, FL, United States; Florida State University, Coastal and Marine Laboratory, St. Teresa, FL, United States and Daniela Zeppilli, IFREMER, EEP-LEP, Plouzané, France
 
Sponges as primary producers of a deep sea sponge ground? (Invited) (650166)
Ulrike Hanz, NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Reasearch, den Hoorn, Netherlands, Marcel van der Meer, NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Department of Marine Microbiology and Biogeochemistry, Den Burg, Netherlands, Philip M. Riekenberg, NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Reasearch, Den Burg, Netherlands, , University of Amsterdam, Freshwater and marine ecology, Amsterdam, Netherlands, Martijn Bart, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, Erik Wurz, Wageningen University and Research, Netherlands, Anna de Kluijver, Utrecht University, Netherlands, Hans Tore Rapp, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway, Gert-Jan Reichart, NIOZ, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Department of Ocean Systems, and Utrecht University, Fac Geosci, Dept Earth Sci, Texel, Netherlands and Furu Mienis, NIOZ, Den Burg, Netherlands
 
Spatio-temporal anthropogenic footprints on ecosystem drivers of the interior North Atlantic (639542)
Jerry Tjiputra, NORCE Norwegian Research Centre and Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen, Norway and Leonardo Bertini, NORCE Norwegian Research Centre, Climate, Norway