OB14B:
Energy Metabolism and Calcification in Marine Organisms: Mechanisms and Responses to Environmental Stress II Posters

Session ID#: 85298

Session Description:
Environmental temperature, salinity, oxygen, and pH/carbonate chemistry can profoundly affect the energy budget of marine organisms, thus negatively affecting their fitness and competitive ability in the ecosystem. It is often claimed that environmental stress increases the costs of homeostatic processes at the expense of reproduction and growth, yet little experimental data exists to support this idea. It is also unclear whether biomineral precursors are formed intra- or extracellularly and how important extra- and intracellular acid-base regulation is for biomineralization processes. Further, energetic costs of biomineralization, as well as potential species-specific differences are poorly understood. This session will bring together researchers working on whole organism and cellular energy budgets of marine organisms, with a focus on mechanistic aspects of cellular homeostasis, energy metabolism and biomineralization, and the effects of environmental stress. We hope to facilitate discussions leading to improved energy budget models, with the ultimate goal of better forecasting potential impacts of natural and ongoing anthropogenic environmental change on marine organisms.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
  • OC - Ocean Change: Acidification and Hypoxia
Index Terms:

1630 Impacts of global change [GLOBAL CHANGE]
1635 Oceans [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4220 Coral reef systems [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4825 Geochemistry [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
Primary Chair:  Frank Melzner, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Marine Ecology, Kiel, Germany
Co-Chair:  Martin Tresguerres, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Frank Melzner, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Marine Ecology, Kiel, Germany
Moderators:  Frank Melzner, GEOMAR, Marine Ecology and Martin Tresguerres, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Frank Melzner, GEOMAR, Marine Ecology

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
Temporal trends in shell calcification of a foundational bivalve: combining baselines and short-term experiments to understand species’ responses in a changing ocean (647923)
Elizabeth Bullard1, Ivan Torres2, Tianqi Ren2, Garfield T Kwan3, Olivia A Graeve2, Martin Tresguerres4 and Kaustuv Roy1, (1)University of California San Diego, Section of Ecology, Behavior and Evolution, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)University of California San Diego, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, La Jolla, CA, United States, (3)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Marine Biology Research Division, La Jolla, CA, United States, (4)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
 
Oxygen Flux Limitation drives Heat Wave Vulnerability of a Coastal Keystone Predator (653920)
Frank Melzner1, Ulrike Findeisen2, Christian Bock3, Claas Hiebenthal4, Mark Lenz4 and Marlene Wall4, (1)GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Marine Ecology, Kiel, Germany, (2)GEOMAR, Marine Ecology, Germany, (3)Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research Bremerhaven, Bremerhaven, Germany, (4)GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany
 
Bivalve regulation of extrapallial fluid carbonate chemistry under ocean acidification: insights from pH, DIC and trace element measurements of the extrapallial fluid (642058)
Louise Cameron1, Alan Downey-Wall2, Jon H Grabowski1, Christopher W Hunt3, Katie Lotterhos2, Elise McNally2, Joseph Salisbury II3, Isaac Thomas Westfield4 and Justin B Ries4, (1)Northeastern University, Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Boston, MA, United States, (2)Northeastern University, Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Boston, United States, (3)University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, United States, (4)Northeastern University, Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Nahant, MA, United States
 
Combining Multiple Geochemical Approaches (B/Ca, δ11B, δ13C, δ18O, ∆47) to Study the Biocalcification Responses of Scleractinian Corals to Seawater Temperature and pH. (643620)
Ilian Antoine DeCorte, University of California - Los Angeles, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States, Maxence Guillermic, University of California Los Angeles, Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences, Los Angeles, United States; IUEM Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, Plouzané, France, Colleen Bove, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, United States, Sambuddha Misra, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, Centre for Earth Sciences, Bangalore, India, Mervyn Greaves, University of Cambridge, Godwin Laboratory for Palaeoclimate Research, Cambridge, United Kingdom, Karl Castillo, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Marine Sciences, Chapel Hill, NC, United States, Justin B Ries, Northeastern University, Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Boston, MA, United States and Robert Eagle, University of California Los Angeles, Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States
 
Critical salinity of benthic osmoconformers in the Baltic Sea (650315)
Imke Podbielski, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Marine Ecology, Kiel, Germany, Markus Bleich, Christian-Albrechts-University, Physiology, Kiel, Germany and Frank Melzner, GEOMAR, Marine Ecology
 
Effects of Ocean Acidification and Warming on the Physiology of Crassostrea virginica Larvae: From the Cellular to Whole-organism Levels (653108)
Annie Schatz1, Jan McDowell2 and Emily Bethana Rivest1, (1)Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Biological Sciences, Gloucester Point, VA, United States, (2)Virginia Institute of Marine Science, United States
 
Examining symbiont selection and polyp connectivity in Astrangia poculata (642220)
Juliette Thibodeau1, Mayra Sánchez-García2 and Loretta Roberson2, (1)University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States, (2)Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA, United States
 
Studying Coastal Acidification Effect on the Atlantic Surfclam, Spisula solidissima through an Experimental and Modeling Survey (643156)
Emilien Pousse1, Matthew Poach1, Dylan H Redman1, George Sennefelder1, David Veilleux1, Melissa Krisak1, Mark S. Dixon1, Yaqin Li1, Eileen E Hofmann2, John Michael Klinck II3, Daphne Munroe4, Gary H. Wilkfors1 and Shannon Meseck1, (1)NOAA Fisheries - Milford, Milford, CT, United States, (2)Old Dominion University, Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography, Norfolk, VA, United States, (3)Old Dominion University, Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography, Norfolk, United States, (4)Rutgers University Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory, Port Norris, NJ, United States
 
Temperature differentially affects feeding, metabolism, and biosynthesis in larval forms (653389)
Jason Wang, Melissa DellaTorre and Donal T. Manahan, University of Southern California, Biological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States
 
The Impacts of Temperature Changes on the Coral Astrangia poculata (646618)
Celina Ceballos, Eckerd College, St. Petersburg, United States, Loretta Roberson, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA, United States and Mayra Sánchez-García, University of Puerto Rico Rio Piedras Campus, Environmental Science, Rio Piedras, PR, United States
 
The Response of Antarctic Bivalves to Environmental Change in the Southern Ocean (657653)
Maryory Julieth Sarria Dulcey, United States, Suzanne M Jennions, University of Bristol, United Kingdom, D.N. Schmidt, University of Bristol, School of Earth Sciences, Bristol, United Kingdom and Katrin Linse, British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UNITED KINGDOM
 
Unlocking the role of the symbiotic community in the calcification process of the temperate coral Astrangia poculata (639378)
Zoe Dellaert, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States and Loretta Roberson, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA, United States
 
Warmth, and OA, and Hypoxia, Oh My! Interactions of simulated climate change on the metabolism of coastal species (637793)
Gail Schwieterman1, Daniel P Crear2, Danielle Lavoie3, Brooke Anderson4, James Sulikowski5, Peter Bushnell6 and Richard Brill2, (1)Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, VA, United States, (2)Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, United States, (3)Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI, United States, (4)University of New England, Biddeford, United States, (5)Arizona State University, Tempe, United States, (6)Indiana University South Bend, South Bend, United States