IS14A:
Active Optics to Sense Marine Productivity Throughout the World's Coasts and Oceans I Posters

Session ID#: 85381

Session Description:
Photosynthesis by phytoplankton, algal and marine plant forests as well as corals all sustain trophic webs that support marine biodiversity and food security worldwide. Marine primary productivity (MPP) by these organisms ultimately sets the carrying capacity of coastal and ocean ecosystems, and profoundlyinfluences nutrient and mineral(re)cycling. MPP, however, exhibits complex environmental responses that are still poorly understood, and under global climate change MPP is rapidly turning from an indicator of ocean health to one of ocean decline, e.g. harmful algal blooms. Unlocking how MPP varies over space and time is critically needed to support management decisions that can safeguard marine ecosystem functioning, but until recently has remained a central challenge to marine science. New technologies now enable semi (or fully) automated chemical sensors to measure mixed layer dissolved gases (e.g. O2, N2, Ar, and CO2) as tracers of net community productivity, and bio-optical sensors of both photosynthetic community composition(and cell size) and ‘currencies’ of gross photosynthesis and export including electron transfer, ATP, and sinking rates. This session will consider how development and deployment of such technologies are rapidly transforming our understanding of MPP, and underpin a new era for synoptic assessment of ocean functioning. Furthermore, how more autonomous data collection modes via platforms, from mooring and ships of opportunities to satellites, can support regional water framework and marine strategy directives needed to deliver UN Sustainable Development Goals.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • CP - Coastal and Estuarine Processes
  • OB - Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry
Index Terms:

1635 Oceans [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4264 Ocean optics [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4853 Photosynthesis [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4894 Instruments, sensors, and techniques [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
Primary Chair:  David J Suggett, University of Technology Sydney, Climate Change Cluster, Sydney, Australia
Co-chairs:  Greg Silsbe, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Horn Point Laboratory, Cambridge, United States, Maxim Y Gorbunov, Rutgers University, Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States and , Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Estuarine & Delta Systems (EDS), Yerseke, Netherlands
Primary Liaison:  David J Suggett, University of Technology Sydney, Climate Change Cluster, Sydney, Australia
Moderators:  Greg Silsbe, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Horn Point Laboratory, Cambridge, United States and David J Suggett, University of Technology Sydney, Climate Change Cluster, Sydney, Australia
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Maxim Y Gorbunov, Rutgers University, Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
A Novel Diatoxanthin ─ Nonphotochemical Quenching ─ Fluorescence (DNF) Model For The Daytime Change Of In Vivo Fluorescence of Phytoplankton In Coastal Ecosystems (638564)
Yuyuan Xie, Mark S. Dixon, Gary H. Wilkfors, Lisa Guy, Melissa Krisak and Yaqin Li, NOAA Fisheries - Milford, Milford, CT, United States
 
Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlF): an undervalued optical indicator of photosynthetic energy conversion efficiency (639027)
Nina Schuback, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, Swiss Polar Institute, Lausanne, Switzerland, Christina Schallenberg, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia and Philippe Tortell, University of British Columbia, Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Vancouver, BC, Canada
 
Deriving a proxy for iron limitation from chlorophyll fluorescence sensors on buoyancy gliders (643105)
Thomas James Ryan-Keogh, CSIR, Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa and Sandy Jane Thomalla, CSIR, Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observatory, South Africa; University of Cape Town, Marine Research Institute, Cape Town, South Africa
 
The Use of Fast Repetition Rate Fluorometry to Determine Phytoplankton Growth Rate and Nutrient Status via the Ratio of Single-Turnover to Multiple-Turnover Fluorescence (648007)
Matthew Brown, William Bryce Penta and Michael Behrenfeld, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States
 
New Kinetic Fluorescence Technique for Measurements of Photosynthetic Rates and Instantaneous Growth Rates of Phytoplankton, in Relation to Nutrient Stress in the Ocean (654232)
Maxim Y Gorbunov and Paul G. Falkowski, Rutgers University, Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States
 
Photosynthetic energy conversion efficiency along the West Antarctic Peninsula (647210)
Jonathan Sherman, Maxim Y Gorbunov, Oscar Schofield and Paul G. Falkowski, Rutgers University, Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States
 
Lidar Measurements of Ocean Optical Properties in Tank Tests and Coastal Water With Model Simulation Closure (652712)
Christopher Michael Strait, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Fort Pierce, United States, Michael S Twardowski, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Ft. Pierce, FL, United States, Fraser Dalgleish, Florida Atlantic University, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Fort Pierce, FL, United States, Alberto Tonizzo, Sunstone Scientific LLC, Fort Pierce, FL, United States and Anni KAISA Vuorenkoski, Florida Atlantic University-HBOI, United States