PI24A:
From Physics to Predators: Environmental Forcing of Marine Ecosystem Hot Spots II Posters

Session ID#: 85781

Session Description:
Understanding the processes that connect ocean physics and biogeochemistry to living marine resources and top predators is of great scientific and societal value, and will benefit from cross-ecosystem comparisons. In marine ecosystems, zooplankton and euphausiids (krill) represent a key link between primary production and higher trophic level species, such as pelagic fishes, marine mammals and seabirds. In theory, ecosystem hotspots are thought to be driven by bottom-up biophysical processes influencing enrichment of nutrients, their concentration and retention, leading to sustained aggregations of mid and high trophic level species.  However, in regions dominated by a strongly advective ocean circulation (e.g., coastal upwelling systems), the formation and persistence of ecosystem hotspots may be decoupled in space and time from primary production and nutrient sources. In this session, we welcome contributions from various marine systems involving observing and modeling approaches (or a combination of both) to elucidate how scales of physical advection combine with those of biological processes to sustain ecosystem hotspots. Of special interest are studies that provide a mechanistic understanding of the fundamental biophysical processes that control marine life aggregations at various spatial and temporal scales, and offer insight into their past, present and future variability in marine ecosystems worldwide.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
  • PL - Physical Oceanography: Mesoscale and Larger
Index Terms:

4273 Physical and biogeochemical interactions [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4830 Higher trophic levels [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4890 Zooplankton [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Jerome Fiechter, University of California Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States
Co-chairs:  Briana Abrahms1, Elliott L. Hazen1 and Monique Messié2, (1)NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Environmental Research Division, Monterey, CA, United States(2)MBARI, Moss Landing, CA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Briana Abrahms, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Environmental Research Division, Monterey, CA, United States
Moderators:  Jerome Fiechter, University of California Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, Steven James Bograd, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Environmental Research Division, Monterey, CA, United States and James Fahlbusch, Cascadia Research Collective, Olympia, WA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Monique Messié, MBARI, Moss Landing, CA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
Methods of Inferring Turbulence Intensity and its Relation to Zooplankton Distributions using Underwater Glider Data (655067)
Tara Howatt1, Tetjana Ross2 and Stephanie Waterman1, (1)University of British Columbia, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Vancouver, BC, Canada, (2)Institute of Ocean Sciences, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Sidney, BC, Canada
 
Linking predator and prey through ocean dynamics in a submarine canyon (654067)
K Ashlyn Ashlyn Giddings, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, La Jolla, CA, United States, Jennifer S Trickey, University of California, San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, David A Demer, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, La Jolla, CA, United States, Peter J. S. Franks, Univ California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States and Simone Baumann-Pickering, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, Acoustic Ecology Laboratory, La Jolla, CA, United States
 
Combining in-situ and satellite derived proxies of temperature and chlorophyll with microplankton analyses to determine differences at the base of the food web in the northern and southern Benguela Upwelling Systems (643089)
Rolf Koppelmann1, Bettina Martin2, Tarron Lamont3, Deon Louw4, Tebatso Moloto5, Knut Heinatz1 and Sandy Thomalla6, (1)University of Hamburg, Institute of Marine Ecosystem and Fishery Science, Hamburg, Germany, (2)University Hamburg, Institute of Marine Ecosystem and Fishery Science, Hamburg, Germany, (3)Department of Environmental Affairs, Oceans & Coasts Research Branch, Cape Town 8012, South Africa, (4)National Marine Information and Research Centre (NatMIRC), Swakopmund, Namibia, (5)Council for Scientific and Industrial Research CSIR, Cape Town, South Africa, (6)CSIR, South Africa
 
Plankton trophic interactions and their spatial variation in the Northern Humboldt Upwelling System (654806)
Mariana Hill Cruz, Iris Kriest, Yonss J. S. Jose and Ivy Frenger, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany
 
Winter preconditioning, mesoscale variability and geomorphology influence the distribution and abundance of krill in the California Current System (641899)
Megan A Cimino, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center Environmental Research Division, Monterey, CA, United States, Jarrod A Santora, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, Isaac D Schroeder, ERD, SWFSC, NOAA, Pacific Grove, CA, United States, Michael Jacox, University of California-Santa Cruz, San Francisco, CA, United States, Elliott L. Hazen, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Environmental Research Division, Monterey, CA, United States and Steven J. Bograd, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Environmental Research Division, Monterey, United States
 
Utilizing satellite observations and a simple plankton model to predict zooplankton hotspots in the California Current Ecosystem (656633)
Monique Messié1, Devon M Northcott2, Jerome Fiechter3, Jarrod A Santora4 and Francisco Chavez1, (1)Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States, (2)University of California San Diego, CA, United States, (3)University of California Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, (4)University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States
 
Krill hotspots in a moving ocean: environmental drivers and ecosystem significance (643883)
Jerome Fiechter, University of California Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, Jarrod A Santora, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, Francisco Chavez, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States, Devon M Northcott, University of California San Diego, CA, United States and Monique Messié, MBARI, Moss Landing, CA, United States
 
Development of integrated habitat suitability index models of skipjack tuna, Pacific saury and neon flying squid in the western North Pacific (641193)
Hiromichi Igarashi1, Yoichi Ishikawa2, Yusuke Tanaka1, Sei-ichi Saitoh3 and Hiroto Abe4, (1)JAMSTEC Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Kanagawa, Japan, (2)JAMSTEC, Yokohama, Japan, (3)Hokkaido University, Arctic Research Center, Sapporo, Japan, (4)Hokkaido University, Faculty of Fisheries Sciences, Hokkaido University, Hakodate, Japan