PL24B:
Atlantic Ocean Variability in a Changing Climate: Observations, Modeling, and Theories IV Posters

Session ID#: 85893

Session Description:
By redistributing a large amount of heat and salt, the Atlantic Ocean significantly impacts regional and global climate over a wide range of time scales. In particular, the Atlantic has seen strong variations in the ocean heat and freshwater content over the past couple of decades, as well as in the uptake and storage of anthropogenic carbon, which has been attributed to changes in the ocean circulation, e.g., those related to the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). However, the mechanisms through which the ocean circulation changes (e.g., in the mean state and variability) and impacts the climate system (e.g., via a series of modes of variability such as the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability, the North Atlantic Oscillation), as well as the feedback, remain poorly understood. This session invites submissions that advance our understanding of the Atlantic Ocean variability, the role it plays in the atmosphere–ocean–sea-ice system, and its impact on the future climate. It aims to bring together recent progress in understanding the circulation and climate variability in the Atlantic sector from paleoclimate, historical and future perspectives. Studies utilizing observational, modeling and/or theoretical frameworks are all welcome.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • AI - Air-Sea Interactions
  • HE - High Latitude Environments
Index Terms:

4504 Air/sea interactions [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
4520 Eddies and mesoscale processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
4532 General circulation [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
9325 Atlantic Ocean [GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION]
Primary Chair:  Feili Li, Duke University, Durham, NC, United States
Co-chairs:  Rohit Ghosh, Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, The Ocean in the Earth System, Hamburg, Germany, Laifang Li, Duke Univ-Earth & Ocean Sci, Durham, NC, United States and Dian Putrasahan, Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany
Primary Liaison:  Feili Li, Duke University, Durham, NC, United States
Moderators:  Rohit Ghosh, Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, The Ocean in the Earth System, Hamburg, Germany and Feili Li, Duke University, Durham, NC, United States
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Rohit Ghosh, Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, The Ocean in the Earth System, Hamburg, Germany and Feili Li, Duke University, Durham, NC, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
Sensitivity of the Multi-decadal AMOC Variability to High-Latitude Convection Across GCMs and Physical Box Model (658038)
Ron Maor, University of Pennsylvania, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Philadelphia, PA, United States, Irina Marinov, University of Pennsylvania, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Philadelphia, PA, United States, Behzad Asadieh, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States and Sergey Molodtsov, Texas A & M University College Station, Texas, TX, United States
 
Wind-driven ocean circulation changes cause the largest freshening event for 120 years in the eastern subpolar North Atlantic (650337)
N. Penny Holliday1, Manfred Bersch2, Bee Berx3, Leon Chafik4, Hjálmar Hátún5, William E Johns6, Simon A Josey7, Karin Margretha Husgard Larsen5, Marilena Oltmanns8,9, Gilles P Reverdin10, H. Thomas Rossby11, Virginie Thierry12 and Hedinn Valdimarsson13, (1)National Oceanography Centre Southampton, United Kingdom, (2)University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany, (3)Marine Scotland Science, Aberdeen, United Kingdom, (4)Stockholm University, Department of Meteorology, Stockholm, Sweden, (5)Faroe Marine Research Institute, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands, (6)Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL, United States, (7)National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom, (8)WHOI, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (9)GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, Kiel, Kiel, Germany, (10)Sorbonne Université - CNRS/IRD/MNHN, LOCEAN, Paris, France, (11)Univ Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI, United States, (12)Ifremer, LOPS, Plouzané, France, (13)Marine Research Institute, Reykjavik, Iceland
 
Deep Convection Variability in the Labrador Sea Versus the Irminger Sea over the last Decades as Simulated with an Eddy-Rich Ocean General Circulation Model (645690)
Siren Ruehs1, Klaus Getzlaff2, Claus W Boning2, Eric Oliver3, Paul G. Myers4 and Arne Biastoch2, (1)Ocean Frontier Institute, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada, (2)GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany, (3)Dalhousie University, Department of Oceanography, Halifax, NS, Canada, (4)University of Alberta, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Edmonton, AB, Canada
 
Variability of Labrador Sea Water in the central subpolar North Atlantic from the late 1990s to the late 2010s (646004)
Dagmar Kieke1, Igor Yashayaev2, Reiner Steinfeldt1, Monika Rhein1 and Birgit A Klein3, (1)University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany, (2)Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Dartmouth, NS, Canada, (3)BSH Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency, Hamburg, Germany
 
AMOC: Densification and Overturning in the Iceland Basin and Irminger Sea (646110)
Tillys Petit, Duke University, Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Durham, United States, Susan Lozier, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, United States, Simon A Josey, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom and Stuart A Cunningham, Scottish Association for Marine Science, Oban, United Kingdom
 
Transport and Evolution of the East Reykjanes Ridge Current (653250)
Greg Koman1, Adam Houk2 and William E Johns1, (1)Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL, United States, (2)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, FL, United States
 
Local winds drive interannual variability of the Gulf Stream North Wall: Results from an adjoint sensitivity analysis (654670)
Christopher Wolfe, Stony Brook University, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook, NY, United States and Xiaohui Liu, Second Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanographic Administration of China, State Key Laboratory of Satellite Ocean Environment Dynamics, Hangzhou, China
 
The Consequences for the North American Shelf of a Shift Toward a Heightened Gulf Stream Presence at the Tail of the Grand Banks (647454)
Afonso Goncalves Neto, Joseph A. Langan and Jaime B Palter, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States
 
Attribution of Predictive Skill Along the Atlantic Water Pathway (642723)
Helene R. Langehaug1,2, Francois Counillon3, Noel Keenlyside4, Elizabeth Maroon5, Daniela Matei6, Juliette Mignot7, Pablo Ortega8, Shuting Yang9, Yiguo Wang1 and Stephen G Yeager10, (1)Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center, Bergen, Norway, (2)Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen, Norway, (3)Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Centre; Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen, Norway, (4)University of Bergen and Bjerknes Centre, Bergen, Norway, (5)National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO, United States, (6)Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany, (7)LOCEAN-IPSL, CNRS-IRD-MNHN-Sorbonne Université, Paris, France, (8)Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Earth Sciences, Barcelona, Spain, (9)Danish Meteorological Institute, København Ø, Denmark, (10)NCAR, Oceanography, Boulder, CO, United States
 
THE SANTANDER ATLANTIC TIME-SERIES A deep water observatory representative of the Eastern North Atlanctic. (645608)
Alicia Lavin1, Raquel Somavilla2, Cesar González-Pola3, Carmen Rodriguez Sra4, Elena Tel Dr4, Daniel Cano5, Amaia Viloria5, Elena Marcos5, Rocío Graña6 and Ignacio Reguera4, (1)Spanish Institute of Oceanography, IEO, Centro Oceanográfico de Santander, Santander, Spain, (2)Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO, CSIC), Physical Oceanography, Santander, Spain, (3)Spanish Institute of Oceanography, Physical Oceanography, Gijon, Spain, (4)IEO, Spain, (5)Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO, CSIC), Santander, Spain, (6)Spanish Institute of Oceanography, Gijón, Spain
 
The impact of upwelling and river outflow on the mesoscale variability in the Caribbean Sea (645672)
Carine G van der Boog1, Julie Pietrzak1, Henk Dijkstra2 and Caroline A Katsman1, (1)Delft University of Technology, Environmental Fluid Mechanics, Delft, Netherlands, (2)Utrecht University, Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
 
Using network theory to understand changes in the Atlantic Ocean transport patterns (650258)
David Wichmann, Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands and Erik van Sebille, Universiteit Utrecht, Institute for Marine & Atmospheric Research, Utrecht, Netherlands
 
The Deep Western Boundary Current from Greenland to Argentina - One Century Long Observations Reveal Multidecadal Variability (656040)
Sunke Schmidtko, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany and Jürgen Fischer, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, Kiel, Kiel, Germany
 
Unraveling the Submesoscale Nature of the Subtropical Mode Water in the South Atlantic (651872)
Olga T Sato, USP University of Sao Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil and Marcelo Dottori, University of Sao Paulo, Oceanographic Institute, Sao Paulo, Brazil
 
Discriminating the Dynamical Nature of the Multi-Scale SSH Variability Over Three Transatlantic Sections at 11°5S, 24°S and 34.5°S (651814)
Paulo S Polito, Univ Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil and Christopher S Meinen, Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, Physical Oceanography Division, Miami, FL, United States
 
Direct measurements of upper ocean horizontal velocity and vertical shear in the tropical North Atlantic (641634)
Renellys C Perez1, Gregory R Foltz2, Rick Lumpkin3, Claudia Schmid2 and Jonathan Andrew Christophersen4, (1)NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, Miami, United States, (2)NOAA/AOML, Miami, United States, (3)NOAA/AOML, Miami, FL, United States, (4)University of Miami, Miami, FL, United States