HE33A:
Variability of High-Latitude Ocean/Sea Ice/Atmosphere Interactions and Associated Convection in a Changing Climate II

Session ID#: 92389

Session Description:
Exchanges of heat, mass, and momentum across the air-sea interface impact the ocean and atmosphere and their interactions within the coupled climate system. In polar regions, these exchanges are significantly enhanced due to large air-sea temperature differences and high wind speeds, and are modulated by sea-ice. Such exchanges contribute in particular to water mass formation and deep convection that in turn impact physical and biogeochemical conditions throughout the world oceans. Because high latitude air-sea-ice interactions involve a complex interplay of processes at the interface between ocean, sea-ice, and atmosphere, many questions remain on the drivers of their temporal and spatial= variability. As more observations of high latitude regions are now available and resolution of numerical models is refined, progress can be made towards a better understanding of air-sea-ice interaction processes, their variability and impacts. In this session, we invite contributions that report on recent progress towards investigating high latitude air-sea-ice interface processes and their impacts on the local ocean, atmosphere, and sea-ice, as well as the larger coupled climate system, using observations, models or both. Contributions that address coastal or open-ocean deep convection in the Southern Ocean, subpolar North Atlantic, and Arctic are particularly welcome. We also invite studies that examine the impact of convection on the uptake of biogeochemical tracers.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • AI - Air-Sea Interactions
  • PC - Past, Present and Future Climate
  • PL - Physical Oceanography: Mesoscale and Larger
Index Terms:
Primary Chair:  Milena Veneziani, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, United States
Co-chairs:  Carolina O. Dufour, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, McGill University, Montreal, Canada, Kent Moore, Univ Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada and Kjetil Våge, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
Primary Liaison:  Milena Veneziani, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, United States
Moderators:  Kent Moore, Univ Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada and Kjetil Våge, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Kent Moore, Univ Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada and Kjetil Våge, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

On the effect of a mid-ocean ridge on the sensitivity of dense water formation and marginal sea dynamics to atmospheric forcing: A conceptual model of the Nordic Seas (643128)
Stefanie Leonore Ypma1, Michael A Spall2, Erwin Lambert3, Sotiria Georgiou4, Julie Pietrzak5 and Caroline A Katsman5, (1)Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research Utrecht, Environmental Fluid Mechanics, Utrecht, Netherlands, (2)WHOI, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (3)Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands, (4)Delft University of Technology, Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Delft, Netherlands, (5)Delft University of Technology, Environmental Fluid Mechanics, Delft, Netherlands
Tracing overflow water from the origin in the Nordic Seas to the Greenland-Scotland Ridge (650341)
Ailin Brakstad, Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen, Norway, Kjetil Våge, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway, Geoffrey Gebbie, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, Woods Hole, United States and Emil Jeansson, NORCE Norwegian Research Centre, Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen, Norway
Lagrangian Perspective on the Origins of Denmark Strait Overflow (637412)
Atousa Saberi1, Thomas W N Haine2, Renske Gelderloos1, Femke de Jong3, Heather H Furey4 and Amy S Bower4, (1)Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States, (2)Johns Hopkins Univ, Baltimore, MD, United States, (3)Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Texel, Netherlands, (4)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Sub-Mesoscale Modelling of the Labrador Sea (641929)
Clark William Pennelly, University of Alberta, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Edmonton, AB, Canada and Paul G. Myers, University of Alberta, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Edmonton, AB, Canada
The value of sustained ocean observations for sea-ice predictions in the Barents Sea (654110)
Mitchell Bushuk1, Xiaosong Yang2, Michael Winton3, Rym Msadek4, Matt Harrison1, Anthony John Rosati1 and Rich Gudgel5, (1)Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, United States, (2)NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, United States, (3)NOAA Geophys Fluid Dynamic, Princeton, NJ, United States, (4)CNRS/CERFACS, Toulouse, France, (5)NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, United States
Mesoscale and Submesoscale Sea Ice-Ocean Interactions in the Arctic Ocean (643527)
Georgy Manucharyan, University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, United States and Andrew F Thompson, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, United States
Response of submesoscale fronts to storms in the Antarctic marginal ice zone (654528)
Sebastiaan Swart1, Marcel du Plessis2, Louise C Biddle3, Sarah-Anne Nicholson4, Andrew F Thompson5, Isabelle S Giddy6,7, Martin Mohrmann8 and Torsten Linders8, (1)University of Gothenburg, Department of Marine Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden, (2)University of Cape Town, Department of Oceanography, Cape Town, South Africa, (3)University of Gothenburg, Department of Marine Science, Gothenburg, Sweden, (4)Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Cape Town, South Africa, (5)California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, United States, (6)University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden, (7)University of Cape Town, Oceanography, Cape Town, South Africa, (8)University of Gothenburg, Marine Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden
Linkage of the Physical Environments in the Northern Antarctic Peninsula Region to the Southern Annular Mode and the Implications for Marine Ecosystem Production (652121)
Zhaoru Zhang1, Eileen E Hofmann2, Michael S Dinniman2, Christian Reiss3, Walker O Smith Jr4 and Meng Zhou1, (1)Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Oceanography, Shanghai, China, (2)Old Dominion University, Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography, Norfolk, VA, United States, (3)NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Antarctic Ecosystem Research Division, La Jolla, CA, United States, (4)Virginia Inst Marine Sciences, Gloucester Point, VA, United States