OC53A:
Chemical and Biological Impacts of Ocean Acidification in the Pacific Ocean I

Session ID#: 92405

Session Description:
Ocean acidification is one of many stressors relevant to ocean ecosystems in a changing climate. In the Pacific Ocean, acidification is occurring in concert with changes in other key processes such as increasing temperature, deoxygenation, changing circulation patterns, changes in nutrient concentrations, and trophic alterations. The nature and magnitude of the impacts from ocean acidification on marine organisms, ecosystems and the biological pump may be different (exaggerated or modulated) when coupled with these other stressors. Understanding these changes and their influence on organisms and ecosystems has the potential to help understand and predict future ecosystem and biogeochemical responses. Furthermore, questions remain regarding the degree to which unexpected or abrupt changes and regime shifts will occur and to what degree and extent the biological and biochemical thresholds would be surpassed. This session will discuss the role of ocean acidification in the context of other stressors, such as temperature, deoxygenation, nutrients enrichment or depletion, taking into consideration the potential for abrupt changes and the role of complex biogeochemical and climatic feedbacks.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • CP - Coastal and Estuarine Processes
  • OB - Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry
  • OM - Ocean Modeling
Index Terms:

4805 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4806 Carbon cycling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4835 Marine inorganic chemistry [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
Primary Chair:  Richard A Feely, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Ocean Climate Research Division, Seattle, WA, United States
Co-Chair:  Nina Bednarsek, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Biogeochemistry, Costa Mesa, CA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Nina Bednarsek, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Biogeochemistry, Costa Mesa, CA, United States
Moderators:  Richard A Feely, NOAA PMEL, Seattle, WA, United States and Nina Bednarsek, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Biogeochemistry, Costa Mesa, CA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Nina Bednarsek, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Biogeochemistry, Costa Mesa, CA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

World's Most Acidic Hydrothermal System off NE Taiwan (638876)
Chen-Tung Arthur Chen1,2, Bin-Jye Crystal Wang1 and Hsiu-I Annie Huang1, (1)National Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Oceanography, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, (2)Zhejiang University, Ocean College, Zhoushan, China
Carbonate Chemistry Through a Transect of the North Pacific: Particle Fluxes and Dissolution Patterns (642375)
William Berelson1, Jess F Adkins2, Adam Subhas3, Sijia Dong1, John Naviaux4, Patrizia Ziveri5 and James William Buchanan Rae6, (1)University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (2)California Institute of Technology, Geological and Planetary Sciences, Pasadena, CA, United States, (3)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Marine Chemistry & Geochemistry, Falmouth, United States, (4)California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, United States, (5)Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain, (6)University of St Andrews, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, St Andrews, United Kingdom
Carbonic anhydrase enhanced calcite dissolution: atomic scale mechanisms and measurements in the North Pacific (643639)
Sijia Dong1, William Berelson2, Adam Subhas3, Nick Rollins4, Hui Teng5, Sahand Pirbadian6, Moh El-Naggar4 and Jess F Adkins7, (1)California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, United States, (2)University of Southern California, Department of Earth Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (3)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, CA, United States, (4)University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (5)George Washington University, Washington, DC, United States, (6)University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States, (7)California Institute of Technology, Geological and Planetary Sciences, Pasadena, CA, United States
Biogenic carbonate budget in the North Pacific Ocean from sub-tropical to subpolar waters (648118)
Patrizia Ziveri1,2, William Robert Gray3, Griselda Anglada I Ortiz4, Clara Manno5, Michael Grelaud1, Alessandro Incarbona6, James William Buchanan Rae3, Sven Pallacks1, Adam Subhas7, Jess F Adkins8 and William Berelson9, (1)Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain, (2)ICREA, Barcelona, Spain, (3)University of St Andrews, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, St Andrews, United Kingdom, (4)Centre for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromso, Norway, (5)NERC British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (6)University of Palermo, Italy, (7)California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, United States, (8)California Institute of Technology, Geological and Planetary Sciences, Pasadena, CA, United States, (9)University of Southern California, Department of Earth Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States
Degradation process of shell density of marine calcified plankton in different pH conditions in the North Pacific (649276)
Katsunori Kimoto1, Nina Bednarsek2, Osamu Sasaki3, Yoshiyuki Nakano1, Masahide Wakita4 and Naomi Harada1, (1)JAMSTEC, Yokosuka, Japan, (2)Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Biogeochemistry, Costa Mesa, CA, United States, (3)Tohoku University Museum, Sendai, Japan, (4)JAMSTEC, MIO, Mutsu, Japan
Dominant Drivers and Effects of Anthropogenically Modified Carbonate Chemistry in a Temperate Fjord System (656261)
Tereza Jarnikova, United States, Susan Allen, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada and Debby Ianson, Institute of Ocean Sciences, Fisheries and Oceans Canada,, Sidney, BC, Canada
Pteropods make thinner shells along a natural ocean acidification gradient (654084)
Lisette Mekkes1, Willem Renema1, Nina Bednarsek2, Simone R Alin3, Richard A Feely3, Jef Huisman4, Peter Roessingh5 and Katja Peijnenburg1, (1)Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Marine Biodiversity, Leiden, Netherlands, (2)Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Biogeochemistry, Costa Mesa, CA, United States, (3)NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States, (4)University of Amsterdam, Department of Freshwater and Marine Ecology, Amsterdam, Netherlands, (5)University of Amsterdam, Department of Evolutionary & Population Biology, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Multiple pathways of pteropods impacting the carbonate budget in the North Pacific (657085)
Nina Bednarsek, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Biogeochemistry, Costa Mesa, CA, United States, Richard A Feely, NOAA PMEL, Seattle, WA, United States and Katsunori Kimoto, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science & Technology, Yokosuka, Japan