OC43A:
The Evolving Ocean Carbon Sink: Processes and Impacts II

Session ID#: 92425

Session Description:
Cumulatively since preindustrial times, only the ocean has been a significant sink for anthropogenic carbon. The partitioning of carbon between the atmosphere and ocean will be a key determinant of future climate change. Thus, our community must develop the capacity to accurately diagnose the evolving ocean carbon budget and its variability using models, observations and theory. Both external forcing and internal physical and biogeochemical processing modify surface fluxes and the internal redistribution of carbon. Regional patterns of key biogeochemical stressors, most notably ocean acidification, will also be driven by the ocean’s carbon uptake. In this session, we welcome contributions that quantify the rates and processes of ocean carbon uptake and storage of anthropogenic carbon, modification of the natural carbon cycle due to physical and biological processes, and consequences of climate change and acidification for marine ecosystems. Variability and change across timescales from seasonal to millennial are of interest. We welcome studies that focus on open and coastal regions; on the surface or the interior; and that apply observations, models, and theory.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • AI - Air-Sea Interactions
  • OB - Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry
  • PC - Past, Present and Future Climate
Primary Chair:  Galen A McKinley, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, NY, United States
Co-chairs:  Nicole S Lovenduski, University of Colorado, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Boulder, CO, United States and Wolfgang Koeve, GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany
Primary Liaison:  Galen A McKinley, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, NY, United States
Moderators:  Galen A McKinley, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, NY, United States and Nicole S Lovenduski, University of Colorado, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Boulder, CO, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Wolfgang Koeve, GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Decadal variability in the Southern Ocean carbon sink: Reconciling the mismatch between hindcast models and observationally-based products (655054)
Lucas Gloege1, Galen A McKinley2, Peter Landschutzer3, Nicole S Lovenduski4, Keith B Rodgers5, Amanda R Fay1, Thomas L Froelicher6, John C Fyfe7, Tatiana Ilyina3, Steve Jones8, Christian Rödenbeck9, Sarah Schlunegger10 and Yohei Takano3, (1)Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, NY, United States, (2)Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, NY, United States, (3)Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany, (4)University of Colorado, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Boulder, CO, United States, (5)IBS Center for Climate Physics, Pusan National University, Busan, South Korea, (6)Princeton Univ, Princeton, NJ, United States, (7)Environment Canada, Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis, Victoria, BC, Canada, (8)University of Bergen, Geophysical Institute, Bergen, Norway, (9)Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena, Germany, (10)Princeton University, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Princeton, NJ, United States
On the Potential of the Southern Ocean Biological Pump to Maintain the Ocean Carbon Sink under Negative Emissions (650547)
Nadine Goris1, Jerry F Tjiputra1, Jörg Schwinger1 and Ingjald Pilskog2, (1)NORCE Climate, Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen, Norway, (2)Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Bergen, Norway
Mechanisms modulating ocean carbon uptake beyond 2100 (657418)
Megumi O. Chikamoto and Pedro N DiNezio, University of Texas at Austin, Institute for Geophysics, Austin, TX, United States
THE BOTTLENECK OF BIOLOGICAL CARBON PUMP FEEDBACKS ON ATMOSPHERIC PCO2 (646034)
Wolfgang Koeve1, Angela Landolfi2, Paul Kähler1 and Andreas Oschlies1, (1)GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany, (2)GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Marine Biogeochemical Modeling, Kiel, Germany
The Microbial Carbon Pump: Quantifying the Dynamics of Dissolved Organic Carbon and its Impact on Atmospheric CO2 (654317)
Jamie Devereux Wilson, University of Bristol, School of Earth Sciences, Bristol, United Kingdom
Nutrient Controls on Export Production in the Southern Ocean (643870)
Lionel Arteaga, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, United States, Markus Pahlow, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany, Seth M Bushinsky, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States and Jorge L Sarmiento, Princeton University, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program, Princeton, NJ, United States
Variable C/P Composition of Organic Production and its Effect on Ocean Carbon Storage in Glacial Model Simulations (643077)
Jonas Nycander, Stockholm University, Dept of Meteorology, Stockholm, Sweden, Malin Ödalen, Stockholm University, Department of Meteorology, Stockholm, Sweden, Andy Ridgwell, University of California Riverside, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Riverside, CA, United States, Kevin I. C. Oliver, University of Southampton, Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom, Carlye Peterson, University of California Riverside, Earth Sciences, Riverside, CA, United States and Johan Nilsson, Stockholm University, Department of meteorology, Stockholm, Sweden
Response of atmospheric pCO2 to glacial changes in the Southern Ocean amplified by carbonate compensation (649593)
Hidetaka Kobayashi, Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan and Akira Oka, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Japan