PI21A:
From Physics to Predators: Environmental Forcing of Marine Ecosystem Hot Spots I

Session ID#: 92452

Session Description:
Understanding the processes that connect ocean physics and biogeochemistry to living marine resources and top predators is of great scientific and societal value, and will benefit from cross-ecosystem comparisons. In marine ecosystems, zooplankton and euphausiids (krill) represent a key link between primary production and higher trophic level species, such as pelagic fishes, marine mammals and seabirds. In theory, ecosystem hotspots are thought to be driven by bottom-up biophysical processes influencing enrichment of nutrients, their concentration and retention, leading to sustained aggregations of mid and high trophic level species.  However, in regions dominated by a strongly advective ocean circulation (e.g., coastal upwelling systems), the formation and persistence of ecosystem hotspots may be decoupled in space and time from primary production and nutrient sources. In this session, we welcome contributions from various marine systems involving observing and modeling approaches (or a combination of both) to elucidate how scales of physical advection combine with those of biological processes to sustain ecosystem hotspots. Of special interest are studies that provide a mechanistic understanding of the fundamental biophysical processes that control marine life aggregations at various spatial and temporal scales, and offer insight into their past, present and future variability in marine ecosystems worldwide.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
  • PL - Physical Oceanography: Mesoscale and Larger
Index Terms:

4273 Physical and biogeochemical interactions [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4830 Higher trophic levels [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4890 Zooplankton [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Jerome Fiechter, University of California Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States
Co-chairs:  Briana Abrahms1, Elliott L. Hazen1 and Monique Messié2, (1)NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Environmental Research Division, Monterey, CA, United States(2)MBARI, Moss Landing, CA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Briana Abrahms, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Environmental Research Division, Monterey, CA, United States
Moderators:  Jerome Fiechter, University of California Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, Steven James Bograd, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Environmental Research Division, Monterey, CA, United States and James Fahlbusch, Cascadia Research Collective, Olympia, WA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Monique Messié, MBARI, Moss Landing, CA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Diel Vertical Migration of Krill in a Subsurface Eddy may Promote Retention within Palmer Deep Canyon (651699)
Katherine Hudson Gallagher1, Matthew J Oliver1, Josh T Kohut2, John Michael Klinck II3 and Michael S Dinniman4, (1)University of Delaware, Newark, DE, United States, (2)Rutgers University, Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, (3)Old Dominion University, Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography, Norfolk, United States, (4)Old Dominion University, Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography, Norfolk, VA, United States
Is Zooplankton Community Structure Spatially and Temporally Persistent in the Eastern North Pacific? (654644)
Brian Hoover1, Marisol Garcia-Reyes1, Sonia Batten2, Chelle L Gentemann3, Kathleen B Dohan4 and William J Sydeman1, (1)Farallon Institute, Petaluma, CA, United States, (2)CPR Survey, Marine Biological Association, BC, Canada, (3)Earth and Space Research, Seattle, WA, United States, (4)Earth & Space Research, Seattle, WA, United States
Bathymetry Structures Predator-prey Dynamics between Zooplankton and Fish in Marine Pelagic Ecosystems (645242)
Johanna Myrseth Aarflot1, Dag L. Aksnes2, Padmini Dalpadado3, Anders Opdal4 and Øyvind Fiksen2, (1)Institute of Marine Research Bergen, Ecosystem processes, Bergen, Norway, (2)University of Bergen, Department of Biosciences, Bergen, Norway, (3)Institute of Marine Research Bergen, Plankton group, Bergen, Norway, (4)University of Bergen, Department of Biosciences, Norway
Identifying physical drivers of predator-prey hotspots in the California Current Ecosystem (636594)
Elizabeth M Phillips1,2, Michael Malick1,2, Sandra L Parker-Stetter1, Melissa A Haltuch1 and Mary Hunsicker3, (1)NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA, United States, (2)NRC Research Associateship Program, Washington, DC, United States, (3)NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Newport, OR, United States
Fine-scale Oceanographic Drivers of Foraging in California Blue Whales (644193)
James Fahlbusch1,2, Max Czapanskiy3, David Cade4,5, John Calambokidis2 and Jeremy A Goldbogen3, (1)Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biology, Stanford, CA, United States, (2)Cascadia Research Collective, Olympia, WA, United States, (3)Hopkins Marine Station/ Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA, United States, (4)Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biology, Pacific Grove, CA, United States, (5)University of California Santa Cruz, Institute of Marine Science, Santa Cruz, CA, United States
Voyage to the White Shark Café (656238)
Barbara Block1, Jan H Witting2, Leif N Thomas3, Nathan Truelove4, Elizabeth Andruszkiewicz5, Taylor Chapple6, Elan Portner7, Bruce H Robison8, Aaron B Carlisle9, Danielle Haulsee10, Salvador Jorgensen11, Paul Kanive12, Amanda Nicole Netburn13, Scot Anderson11, Tim White3 and Matthew J Oliver14, (1)Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford, CA, United States, (2)Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, United States, (3)Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States, (4)Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, United States, (5)Stanford University, Portola Valley, CA, United States, (6)Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove, CA, United States, (7)NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, La Jolla, CA, United States, (8)MBARI, Moss Landing, CA, United States, (9)University of Delaware, Lewes, United States, (10)University of Delaware, Oceanography, Lewes, DE, United States, (11)Monterey Bay Aquarium, CA, United States, (12)Montana State University, CA, United States, (13)NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Silver Spring, United States, (14)University of Delaware, Newark, DE, United States
Biomass flows between pelagic predator communities in the California Current (653572)
Jerome Guiet1, Daniele Bianchi1, Olivier Maury2, Faycal Kessouri3 and Nicolas Barrier2, (1)University of California Los Angeles, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (2)Institute for Research and Development, UMR-MARBEC, Sète, France, (3)Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Costa Mesa, CA, United States
The emergence of dynamic management approaches in ocean ecosystems with a comparison to management of terrestrial ecosystems (639880)
Larry Crowder, Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford University, Department of Biology, Pacific Grove, CA, United States, William Oestreich, Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biology, Pacific Grove, CA, United States, Melissa Chapman, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, United States and Elliott L. Hazen, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Environmental Research Division, Monterey, CA, United States