OB34B:
Complexity, Connectivity, and Change in Southern Ocean Food Webs II Posters

Session ID#: 92487

Session Description:
Changes in ice, ocean and ecosystem dynamics in the Southern Ocean are affecting biodiversity at all trophic levels, from plankton to whales. These reflect multiple drivers of change and the complexity and heterogeneity of ecosystems and ecological responses. Food-web processes are fundamental in maintaining the structure, functioning and resilience of ecosystems and hence in ecological responses to change. Improved understanding of Southern Ocean food webs is crucial for developing models to project the impacts of future change and informing decision making for conservation and management. An international and interdisciplinary approach is required to link studies of food webs with analyses of biogeochemical cycles and physical and chemical processes at multiple scales. This session is intended to bring together studies on emerging areas of research including the spatial and temporal variability and connectivity of food webs, food web resilience properties and biodiversity, interactions between pelagic, sea-ice or benthic food webs, importance of food-web processes in biogeochemical cycles (including carbon budgets) and combined effects of past and current harvesting and climate-related changes on individual species and their food web interactions. Presentations that report field, data syntheses and modelling studies that elucidate the structure and dynamics of Southern Ocean food webs are encouraged.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • AI - Air-Sea Interactions
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
  • PI - Physical-Biological Interactions
Index Terms:
Primary Chair:  Nadine Johnston, NERC British Antarctic Survey, Ecosystems, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Co-chairs:  Andrea M Pinones, Instituto de Ciencias Marinas y Limnológicas, Valdivia, Chile, Eugene John Murphy, British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom and Eileen E Hofmann, Old Dominion University, Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography, Norfolk, VA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Nadine Johnston, NERC British Antarctic Survey, Ecosystems, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Moderators:  Eugene John Murphy, British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom and Eileen E Hofmann, Old Dominion University, Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography, Norfolk, VA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Stuart Corney, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
Future Directions of the Integrating Climate and Ecosystems Dynamics (ICED) in the Southern Ocean Programme (645426)
Nadine Johnston, NERC British Antarctic Survey, Ecosystems, Cambridge, United Kingdom, Eugene John Murphy, British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom, Rachel ~D Cavanagh, NERC British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom, Richard Garth James Bellerby, State Key Laboratory for Estuarine and Coastal Research, East China Normal University, SKLEC-NIVA Centre for Marine and Coastal Research, Shanghai, China, Daniel P Costa, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, Eileen E Hofmann, Old Dominion University, Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography, Norfolk, VA, United States, Walker O Smith Jr, Virginia Inst Marine Sciences, Gloucester Point, VA, United States and José C Xavier, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
 
Microbial control of ocean carbon and biogeochemical cycling in a changing polar ocean: Insights from ecosystem modeling of the West Antarctic Peninsula (640307)
Hyewon Kim, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Ya-Wei Luo, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China, Hugh W Ducklow, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Division of Biology & Paleo Environment, Palisades, NY, United States, Oscar Schofield, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, Deborah K Steinberg, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William & Mary, Gloucester Point, VA, United States and Scott Doney, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, United States
 
Protist community structure and diversity at the West Antarctic Peninsula in austral fall – reconciling metabarcoding, microscopy and pigment analyses (650873)
Philipp M. Wenta1, Christoph Plum1, Dominik Bahlburg1, Katja Metfies2,3, Marina Monti4, Thomas H. Badewien1 and Stefanie Devi Moorthi1, (1)University of Oldenburg, Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment, Wilhelmshaven, Germany, (2)Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany, (3)Helmholtz Institute for Functional Marine Biodiversity, Oldenburg, Germany, (4)National Institute of Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics, Sgonico, Italy
 
Spatial Variability of Microbial Communities in the Ross Sea, Antarctica (647246)
Barbara Klein1, Erika L Headrick2, Lisa Nigro3, Patrick Neale4 and Wade H Jeffrey3, (1)The University of West Florida, Center for Environmental Diagnostics & Bioremediation, Pensacola, FL, United States, (2)University of West Florida, Center for Environmental Diagnostics & Bioremediation, Pensacola, FL, United States, (3)University of West Florida, Center for Environmental Diagnostics and Bioremediation, Pensacola, FL, United States, (4)Smithsonian Environmental Research Center Edgewater, Edgewater, MD, United States
 
Quantifying Particulate Organic Carbon Concentrations and Flux in the Southwestern Ross Sea Using Autonomous Glider Data (653952)
Meredith Meyer1, Walker O Smith Jr2 and Randolph Michael Jones1, (1)Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Biological Sciences, Gloucester Point, VA, United States, (2)Virginia Inst Marine Sciences, Gloucester Point, VA, United States
 
Processes Driving Carbon and Oxygen Fluxes in the High Latitude Southern Ocean Determined from Biogeochemical-Argo Floats (643674)
Jade Sauve1, Alison R Gray2, Stephen Riser2 and Seth M Bushinsky3, (1)University of Washington Seattle Campus, School of Oceanography, Seattle, United States, (2)University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States, (3)University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States
 
Zonal asymmetries in Southern Ocean primary productivity and carbon uptake (653385)
Channing Prend1, Alison R Gray2, Takaya Uchida3, Isabella Rosso4, Sarah T Gille5 and Lynne D Talley4, (1)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States, (3)Columbia University of New York, Palisades, NY, United States, (4)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States, (5)UCSD, La Jolla, CA, United States
 
Influence of the diatom assemblage structure on the export of C and Si around the Kerguelen plateau (645636)
Augustin Lafond1, Karine Leblanc2, Bernard Queguiner3, Véronique Cornet4 and Justine Legras4, (1)Aix Marseille University, Marseille Cedex 03, France, (2)Aix Marseille University, Meditterranean Institute of Oceanography, Marseille Cedex 03, France, (3)Aix Marseille University, Marseille, France, (4)Aix Marseille University, France
 
Southern Ocean annual net community production using combined biogeochemical mass balances on profiling floats (655140)
Seth M Bushinsky, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Marine Sciences Building, Honolulu, HI, United States, Lionel Arteaga, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, United States, Alison R Gray, University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States and Jorge L Sarmiento, Princeton University, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program, Princeton, NJ, United States
 
‘We still say that NASA satellite algorithms under-estimate chlorophyll in the Southern Ocean’ (644561)
Robert Johnson1, Kimberlee Baldry2, Peter G Strutton3 and Guillaume Liniger2, (1)University of Tasmania, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, Hobart, TAS, Australia, (2)University of Tasmania, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), Hobart, TAS, Australia, (3)Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia
 
Autonomous Biogeochemical Floats Link Huge Southern Ocean Phytoplankton Bloom to Maud Rise Polynya (641086)
Lauren von Berg1, Channing Prend2, Ethan C Campbell3, Matthew R Mazloff2, Lynne D Talley2 and Sarah T Gille2,4, (1)Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, United States, (2)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (3)University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States, (4)UCSD, La Jolla, CA, United States
 
Stratification Control of Phytoplankton Bloom in Circum-Antarctic Coastal Polynyas: Data Analysis and Modeling (657588)
Yun Li, University of Delaware, School of Marine Science and Policy, Newark, United States, Rubao Ji, Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., Biology Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States and Weifeng Gordon Zhang, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States
 
Summer Phytoplankton Growth at Maxwell Bay, West Antarctic Peninsula: Role of Physical Forcings (648197)
Vania Carrera1,2, Andrea M Pinones1,3, Fabian J Tapia4,5, Emilio Alarcón1,6, Juan Höfer1,7, Eun Jin Yang8 and Jose Luis Iriarte1,9, (1)Centro de Investigación: Dinámica de Ecosistemas Marinos de Altas Latitudes, Punta Arenas, Chile, (2)Programa Magíster en Oceanografía, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción, Chile, (3)Instituto de Ciencias Marinas y Limnológicas, Valdivia, Chile, (4)Universidad de Concepcion, Departamento de Oceanografía, Concepcion, Chile, (5)Centro de Investigación Oceanográfica COPAS Sur-Austral, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción, Chile, (6)Centro de Investigación en Ecosistemas de la Patagonia, Coyhaique, Chile, (7)Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Valparaiso, Chile, (8)Korea Polar Research Institute, Incheon, South Korea, (9)Universidad Austral de Chile, Puerto Montt, Chile