PL51A:
Ocean Tides: From Planetary to Turbulent Scales I

Session ID#: 92685

Session Description:
This session welcomes talks on the observation and prediction of surface and internal tides on Earth or other planets. Tides impact many aspects of the ocean sciences. The dissipation of tidal energy may influence climate by driving vertical fluxes balancing deep-water formation at high latitudes. The associated mixing is also key for sustaining primary production in the ocean, and surface tides may drive evolutionary process near the coastal boundary where tidal ranges are large. Recently, the combination of accelerated sea-level rise and spring tides has resulted in sunny-weather flooding in some coastal locations. While much progress has been made in predicting surface and internal tides in numerical models, internal tides are still more difficult to predict than surface tides because the relatively short-length scale internal tides are easily refracted and scattered by the mesoscale background flows. There is great potential to improve their predictability by assimilating observed mesoscale fields, improving gravity wave damping schemes, and increasing model resolution. Ultimately, this will benefit operational forecasting and allow for the removal of the tides from altimetry collected in the upcoming Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • CP - Coastal and Estuarine Processes
  • OM - Ocean Modeling
  • PI - Physical-Biological Interactions
Index Terms:

4263 Ocean predictability and prediction [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4544 Internal and inertial waves [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
4560 Surface waves and tides [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
4568 Turbulence, diffusion, and mixing processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
Primary Chair:  Maarten C Buijsman, University of Southern Mississippi, Stennis Space Center, MS, United States
Co-chairs:  Mattias Green, Bangor University, School of Ocean Sciences, Bangor, LL59, United Kingdom, Zhongxiang Zhao, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States and Sophie-Berenice Wilmes, Bangor University, Menai Bridge, United Kingdom
Primary Liaison:  Maarten C Buijsman, University of Southern Mississippi, Stennis Space Center, MS, United States
Moderators:  Maarten C Buijsman, University of Southern Mississippi, Stennis Space Center, MS, United States and Mattias Green, Bangor University, School of Ocean Sciences, Bangor, LL59, United Kingdom
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Maarten C Buijsman, University of Southern Mississippi, Stennis Space Center, MS, United States and Mattias Green, Bangor University, School of Ocean Sciences, Bangor, LL59, United Kingdom

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Improving tidal accuracy in a high-resolution global ocean circulation model (647200)
Jay F Shriver, US Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, United States, James G Richman, Naval Research Lab Stennis Space Center, Stennis Space Center, MS, United States, Innocent Souopgui, University of Southern Mississippi, Department of Marine Science, Slidell, LA, United States, SAND-Brian K Arbic, University of Michigan, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI, United States and Maarten C Buijsman, University of Southern Mississippi, Stennis Space Center, MS, United States
4.5 billion years of Earth-Moon evolution from high-level ocean tide and orbital dynamics models: First results (642207)
SAND-Brian K Arbic1, Houraa Daher1, James G Williams2, Joseph K Ansong3, Dale H. Boggs4, Malte Müller5, Michael Schindelegger6, Alistair Adcroft7, Jacqueline Austermann8, Bruce D Cornuelle9, Eliana Crawford10, Oliver B Fringer11, Harriet C. P. Lau12, Simon James Lock13, Adam C Maloof14, Dimitris Menemenlis15, Jerry X Mitrovica16, Mattias Green17 and Matt Huber18, (1)University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, MI, United States, (2)NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States, (3)Univ of MI-Earth & Environ Sci, Ann Arbor, MI, United States, (4)NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, United States, (5)Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo, Norway, (6)University of Bonn, Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformation, Bonn, Germany, (7)Princeton University, Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Princeton, United States, (8)Harvard University, Cambridge, United States, (9)University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States, (10)Kenyon College, United States, (11)Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States, (12)Harvard University, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Cambridge, United States, (13)Harvard Univ, Cambridge, MA, United States, (14)Princeton University, Department of Geosciences, Princeton, NJ, United States, (15)NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, United States, (16)Harvard University, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Cambridge, MA, United States, (17)Bangor University, School of Ocean Sciences, Bangor, LL59, United Kingdom, (18)Purdue University, Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, West Lafayette, United States
Antarctic ice-shelf thinning drives 21st-century changes in global tides (645409)
Michael Schindelegger1, Mattias Green2, Roelof Rietbroek1, Nick Golledge3 and Luke P Jackson4, (1)University of Bonn, Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformation, Bonn, Germany, (2)Bangor University, School of Ocean Sciences, Bangor, LL59, United Kingdom, (3)Victoria University of Wellington, Antarctic Research Centre, Wellington, New Zealand, (4)University of Oxford, Climate Econometrics, Nuffield College, Oxford, United Kingdom
The Potential of SWOT Data for Mapping Estuarine and Coastal Tides (652324)
Pascal Matte1, Silvia Innocenti2, Aqeel Albahadily3, Stefan A Talke4, David A Jay3, Vincent Fortin5, Natacha Bernier5, Yves Secretan6 and Marc Simard7, (1)Environment and Climate Change Canada, Meteorological Research Division, Quebec, QC, Canada, (2)Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Eau-Terre-Environnement, Québec, QC, Canada, (3)Portland State University, Portland, OR, United States, (4)California State Polytechnic University, San Luis Obispo, Civil and Environmental Engineering, San Luis Obispo, SC, United States, (5)Environment and Climate Change Canada, Meteorological Research Division, Dorval, QC, Canada, (6)Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Eau Terre Environnement, Quebec, QC, Canada, (7)Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, United States
The Problematic psi1 Tide (644519)
Richard D Ray1, SAND-Brian K Arbic2, Jean-Paul Boy3, Gary D Egbert4, Svetlana Erofeeva4, Leonid Petrov5 and Jay F Shriver6, (1)NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States, (2)University of Michigan, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI, United States, (3)Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, EOST, IPGS UMR 7516, Strasbourg, France, (4)Oregon State Univ, Corvallis, OR, United States, (5)NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Falls Church, VA, United States, (6)Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center, Stennis Space Center, MS, United States
M2-Internal-Tide Generation in a 0.1 Degree Global Simulation of Circulations and Tides with Realistic Topography (638930)
Jin-Song von Storch and Zhuhua Li, Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany
The Generation and Fate of internal tides on the North West European Shelf (645465)
Jeff Polton1, Maria V. Luneva2 and Jason T Holt1, (1)National Oceanography Center, Liverpool, United Kingdom, (2)National Oceanography Center, Liverpool, L3, United Kingdom
Numerical investigation of variable reflection of the mode-1 internal tide from the Tasmania continental slope. (655927)
Dmitry Brazhnikov1, Harper L Simmons1 and Samuel Maurice Kelly2, (1)University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United States, (2)University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth, MN, United States