CT23A:
The role of micronutrient cycles in global-scale dynamics I

Session ID#: 92779

Session Description:
Via their fundamental control on ocean productivity and the biological carbon pump, the cycling of nutrients plays an integral role in the dynamics of atmospheric CO2 and climate. In contrast to the ‘big three’- nitrogen, phosphorus and silicon, with their well characterised modern distributions and relatively stable inventories, micronutrients, such as iron, remain relatively poorly observed and have the potential for rapid and profound changes in their inventories and biological availability in response to a host of poorly constrained processes. Micronutrients are currently the ‘wild card’ in both past and future carbon cycle and climate change, prompting the need for improved understanding of their role in Earth system dynamics. We invite a broad range of submissions to provide insights into the pieces of the puzzle, addressing boundary inputs and sinks, exchanges between dissolved and solid phases, interactions with organic compounds, and their reciprocal interactions with microbial ecosystems. Submissions may include observations, data synthesis or models, and may address ocean nutrient cycling over a range of time-scales, from past (paleo) through contemporary, and/or in response to future global change. We particularly encourage new insights into the role of feedbacks and the role micronutrient cycles play in shaping global-scale dynamics.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • MG - Marine Geology and Sedimentology
  • PC - Past, Present and Future Climate
Index Terms:

4845 Nutrients and nutrient cycling [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4875 Trace elements [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4912 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [PALEOCEANOGRAPHY]
Primary Chair:  Andy Ridgwell, University of California Riverside, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Riverside, CA, United States
Co-Chair:  Alessandro Tagliabue, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom
Primary Liaison:  Andy Ridgwell, University of California Riverside, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Riverside, CA, United States
Moderators:  Andy Ridgwell, University of California Riverside, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Riverside, CA, United States and Alessandro Tagliabue, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Andy Ridgwell, University of California Riverside, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Riverside, CA, United States and Alessandro Tagliabue, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Experimental study investigating the abiotic dissolution kinetics of iron during lithogenic particle-water interactions in high-energy regions (642025)
Jessica Klar1, Sebastien Fabre2, Francois Lacan3, Catherine Jeandel4, Nicolas Estrade3, Hamida Yefsah3, Lise Artigue3, David Gonzalez Santana5 and Hélène Planquette5, (1)CEFREM, Université de Perpignan Via Domitia, Perpignan, France, (2)IRAP, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, CNES, Toulouse, France, (3)LEGOS, University of Toulouse, CNRS, CNES, IRD, UPS, Toulouse, France, (4)LEGOS, Université de Toulouse, (IRD, CNES, CNRS, UPS), Toulouse, France, (5)Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, Université de Bretagne-Occidentale, LEMAR, CNRS, Plouzané, France
Unravelling the Seasonal Cycle of Dissolved Iron on the Antarctic Continental Margins: Fall-Winter Observations from the Ross Sea Polynyas (638163)
Peter Sedwick, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, United States, Stephen F Ackley, University of Texas at San Antonio, NASA Center for Advanced Measurements in Extreme Environments (CAMEE), San Antonio, TX, United States, Michael S Dinniman, Old Dominion University, Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography, Norfolk, VA, United States, Brice Loose, University of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI, United States, Bettina M Sohst, Old Dominion University, Department of Ocean, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Norfolk, VA, United States and Sharon Elisabeth Stammerjohn, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, United States
Massive Bloom Fed by Elevated Iron of Possible Hydrothermal Origin in the Pacific Sector of the Southern Ocean (657107)
Casey Schine1, Anne-Carlijn Alderkamp2, Gert van Dijken1, Loes JA Gerringa3, Patrick Laan4, Willem van de Poll5 and Kevin R Arrigo1, (1)Stanford University, Earth System Science, Stanford, CA, United States, (2)De Anza College, Biological, Health and Environmental Sciences, Cupertino, CA, United States, (3)NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, and Utrecht University, OCS, Den Burg, Netherlands, (4)NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Netherlands, (5)University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
Constraining the Global Marine Copper Cycle through a Data-based Modeling Approach (648815)
Hengdi Liang1, James W Moffett1 and Prof Seth John2, (1)University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (2)University of Southern California, Department of Earth Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, United States
Minimum cobalt and iron requirements of Prochlorococcus: predicting micronutrient limitation thresholds for the ocean’s most abundant photoautotroph (648031)
Nicholas Hawco1, Mak A Saito2, Alessandro Tagliabue3, Randelle M Bundy4, Matthew R McIlvin5, Tyler Goepfert6, Luis Valentin-Alvarado7 and Dawn M Moran5, (1)University of Hawai'i, Honolulu, CA, United States, (2)WHOI, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (3)University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom, (4)University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States, (5)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (6)Arizona State University, METAL Lab, Tempe, AZ, United States, (7)University of California at Berkeley, United States
Nutrient colimitation and an emergent "ligand-iron-microbe" feedback in global ocean biogeochemistry and ecosystem models. (653643)
Jonathan Maitland Lauderdale1, Rogier Braakman2, Gael Forget2, Stephanie Dutkiewicz1 and Michael J Follows2, (1)Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Cambridge, MA, United States, (2)Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, United States
Towards a mechanistic understanding of the decoupling between oceanic iron and carbon remineralization length-scales (649828)
Philip W. Boyd1, Pamela M Barrett2, Sam Eggins3, Michael Joseph Ellwood4, Robin Grün4 and Matthieu Bressac5, (1)University of Tasmania, Biogeochemistry, Hobart, TAS, Australia, (2)The Australian National University, Research School of Earth Sciences, Canberra, ACT, Australia, (3)The Australian National University,, Research School of Earth Sciences, Canberra, ACT, Australia, (4)Australian National University, Research School of Earth Sciences, Canberra, ACT, Australia, (5)University of Tasmania, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, Ecology and Biodiversity, Hobart, TAS, Australia
Climate change impacts on the distribution and cycling of essential micronutrients (646117)
Camille Richon, United States and Alessandro Tagliabue, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom