CP53A:
Carbon Accumulation and Its Long-Term Stability in Blue Carbon Ecosystems I

Session ID#: 92790

Session Description:
Blue carbon ecosystems (BCEs) are coastal ecosystems, such as salt marshes, mangroves, tidal freshwater wetlands, and seagrass meadows, with manageable and atmospherically significant carbon stocks and fluxes. Each of these systems stores organic carbon in its soils or sediments, which comprise its carbon sediment “sink”.  Such sequestration of carbon provides a valuable ecosystem service by mitigating carbon pollution.  Although carbon accumulation rates have been measured in all types of BCEs, less attention has been paid to the similarities and differences in carbon accumulation processes in different ecosystem types and the relative stability of carbon sediment sinks under sea-level rise and global climate change.  In this session, we invite those working in a variety of BCEs to present their work on carbon storage assessments, but with a particular focus on cross-BCE comparisons, process-level modeling, impacts from climate change/sea-level rise, carbon crediting, and restoration challenges.  We welcome papers from across the globe on empirical studies, modeling, and management concerns.  Our overall goal is to facilitate discussion on the science of carbon sequestration, challenges in implementation, and opportunities for partnering with land managers to increase long-term carbon storage in blue carbon sediment sinks.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • MG - Marine Geology and Sedimentology
  • OB - Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry
Index Terms:

1615 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4805 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4806 Carbon cycling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4863 Sedimentation [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Judith Z Drexler, USGS California Water Science Center, Sacramento, CA, United States
Co-chairs:  James W Fourqurean, Florida International Univ, Miami, FL, United States and Ken Krauss, U.S. Geological Survey, Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, Lafayette, LA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Judith Z Drexler, U.S. Geological Survey, Sacramento, CA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Contribution of mud-associated organic matter to marsh blue carbon (641032)
Giulio Mariotti and Tracy E Quirk, Louisiana State University, Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Baton Rouge, LA, United States
Opposing Effects of Temperature and Elevated CO2 on Tidal Wetland Methane Emissions and Soil Carbon Sequestration (642279)
Patrick Megonigal1, Genevieve L Noyce1 and Matthew L. Kirwan2, (1)Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, United States, (2)Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, United States
Blue carbon sources and carbon accumulation rates in restored versus historic marshes in southern Puget Sound, Washington, USA (644048)
Judith Z Drexler, USGS California Water Science Center, Sacramento, CA, United States, Melanie Davis, USGS Western Ecological Research Center, Olympia, WA, United States and Isa Woo, USGS Western Ecological Research Center, Vallejo, CA, United States
Coupling High Frequency Atmospheric Carbon Flux Measurements with Seasonal Sedimentary Carbon Deposition to Constrain Short-Term Carbon Accumulation: Preliminary Data from a Restored Coastal Wetland in San Francisco Bay (648019)
Joseph A Carlin1, Patty Oikawa2, Jennie Bahramian3, Theresa Duncan4 and Katya Beener4, (1)California State University Fullerton, Department of Geological Sciences, Fullerton, United States, (2)California State University East Bay, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Hayward, CA, United States, (3)California State University East Bay, Hayward, CA, United States, (4)California State University Fullerton, Fullerton, CA, United States
Soil carbon stocks, lability and decomposition rates of surficial and buried organic matter in a large tropical seagrass landscape (650301)
James W Fourqurean, Florida International Univ, Miami, FL, United States and Jason Lee Howard
Carbon Sequestration in Wetlands: a cross Comparison of Intact and Restored, Tidal and Non-tidal Freshwater Wetlands (648781)
Ariane Arias Ortiz1,2, Adina Paytan3, Pere Masqué4 and Dennis D Baldocchi1, (1)University of California Berkeley, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, Berkeley, CA, United States, (2)University of California Santa Cruz, Institute of Marine Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, (3)University of California Santa Cruz, Institute of Marine Sciences, Santa Cruz, United States, (4)Edith Cowan University, School of Science, Joondalup, WA, Australia
Tidal wetland Gross Primary Production across the continental United States, 2000-2018 (634916)
Rusty A Feagin1, Inke Forbrich2, Thomas Huff1, Jordan G Barr3, Jesus Ruiz-Plancarte4, Jose D Fuentes5, Raymond Najjar6, Rodrigo Vargas7, Alma Vazquez Lule8, Lisamarie Windham-Myers9, Kevin D Kroeger10, Eric Ward11, Georgianne W Moore12, Monique Y Leclerc13, Ken Krauss11, Camille LaFosse Stagg14, Merryl Alber15, Sara Knox16, Karina V Schafer17, Thomas S S Bianchi18, Jack Hutchings19, Hafsah B. Nahrawi20, Asko Noormets21, Bhaskar Mitra22, Aline Jaimes23, Audra Hinson24, Brian A Bergamaschi25 and John S King26, (1)Texas A&M University College Station, Ecosystem Science and Management, College Station, TX, United States, (2)Marine Biological Laboratory, Ecosystems Center, Woods Hole, United States, (3)Elder Research, Inc., Charlottesville, VA, United States, (4)Pennsylvania State University Main Campus, University Park, PA, United States, (5)Penn State University, Department of Meteorology and Atmospheric Science, University Park, PA, United States, (6)The Pennsylvania State University, Meteorology and Atmospheric Science, University Park, PA, United States, (7)University of Delaware, Newark, United States, (8)University of Delaware, Plant and Soil Sciences, Newark, DE, United States, (9)USGS - National Research Program, Menlo Park, CA, United States, (10)USGS, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (11)U.S. Geological Survey, Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, Lafayette, LA, United States, (12)Texas A&M University, Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, College Station, TX, United States, (13)University of Georgia, Athens, GA, United States, (14)U.S. Geological Survey, Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, Lafayette, United States, (15)University of Georgia, Marine Sciences, Athens, GA, United States, (16)University of British Columbia, Geography, Vancouver, BC, Canada, (17)National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA, United States, (18)University of Florida, Department of Geological Sciences, Gainesville, United States, (19)Washington University in St Louis, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, St. Louis, MO, United States, (20)University of Georgia, Griffin, United States, (21)Texas A&M University, Department of Ecology and Conservation Biology, College Station, United States, (22)Texas A&M University, Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, Texas, TX, United States, (23)Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, United States, (24)Texas A & M University, College Station, TX, United States, (25)USGS California Water Science Center Sacramento, Sacramento, United States, (26)North Carolina State University, Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, Raleigh, United States
A Multi-algorithm Approach of Modeling Coastal Wetland Eco-Geomorphology at the Global Scale (639315)
Zeli Tan1, Chang Liao1, Yanyan Cheng1, L. Ruby Leung2 and Vanessa Bailey1, (1)Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, United States, (2)Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Richland, WA, United States