CP43A:
Close-Range Remote Sensing of Nearshore Processes and Coastal Morphology II

Session ID#: 92800

Session Description:
During the past decade, LiDAR, radar, multispectral and thermal sensors, as well as modern photogrammetry have become inexpensive and highly accessible. Close-range low-altitude (manned and autonomous aircraft) and ground-based platforms provide datasets with increasingly high resolution, both in time (seconds to days) and space (sub-meter), allowing for detailed observations of changes in coastal landscapes and the related nearshore and beach processes that drive those changes. These advances provide a new understanding of the patterns, rates, and causes of coastal circulation and morphodynamics on scales of kilometers and less. High-resolution, close-range remote sensing also allows for the documentation of ongoing and future effects of storms, sea-level rise, coastal restoration, and human impacts on coastal environments. Additionally, these technologies and methods facilitate interdisciplinary studies of the coastal zone. This session will highlight scientific results that have emerged from these technologies and methods and explore challenges and plans for future remote sensing efforts.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • IS - Ocean Observatories, Instrumentation and Sensing Technologies
  • PS - Physical Oceanography: Mesoscale and Smaller
Index Terms:

4217 Coastal processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4235 Estuarine processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4275 Remote sensing and electromagnetic processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4546 Nearshore processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
Primary Chair:  Brittany Lynn Bruder, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, Duck, NC, United States
Co-chairs:  Jonathan A Warrick, U.S. Geological Survey, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, Shawn R Harrison, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center, MS, United States and Rafael Almar, Laboratoire d'Etudes en Géophysique et Océanographie Spatiales (LEGOS), IRD, Toulouse, France
Primary Liaison:  Brittany Lynn Bruder, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, Duck, NC, United States
Moderators:  Jonathan A Warrick, U.S. Geological Survey, Santa Cruz, CA, United States and Rafael Almar, Laboratoire d'Etudes en Géophysique et Océanographie Spatiales (LEGOS), IRD, Toulouse, France
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Jonathan A Warrick, U.S. Geological Survey, Santa Cruz, CA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

HF Radar wave-spectrum assimilation using SWAN and application for the CASPER-West Experiment (651265)
Philip Anthony Muscarella1, David T Walker1 and Kelsey Brunner2, (1)SRI International, Ocean Modeling Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI, United States, (2)SRI International Ann Arbor, Ocean Modeling Laboratory, Ann Arbor, United States
Remote Sensing of River Bottom Roughness (657024)
Ruth Branch, University of Washington, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Seattle, WA, United States, Alex R Horner-Devine, University of Washington Seattle Campus, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Seattle, WA, United States, Chris Chickadel, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States; University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States, Andrew T. Jessup, University of Washington, United States and Stefan A Talke, California State Polytechnic University, San Luis Obispo, Civil and Environmental Engineering, San Luis Obispo, SC, United States
Identifying the drivers of structural complexity on Hawaiian coral reefs using photogrammetric measures of linear rugosity (647749)
Orion McCarthy, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, United States, Jennifer Smith, Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States, Stuart A Sandin, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States and Vid Petrovic, California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States
Quantifying the Distribution and Shape of Mussel Mounds in Mesotidal Salt Marshes by Means of UAV LiDAR With Relevance to Salt Marsh Survival (657232)
Daniele Pinton1, Alberto Canestrelli2, Christine Angelini3, Benjamin Wilkinson4, Peter Ifju5, Collin Ortals2, Andrew Ortega6 and Sydney Williams7, (1)University of Florida, Civil and Coastal Engineering, Ft Walton Beach, FL, United States, (2)University of Florida, Civil and Coastal Engineering, Gainesville, FL, United States, (3)University of Florida, Engineering School of Sustainable Infrastructure & Environment (ESSIE), Gainesville, FL, United States, (4)University of Florida, Ft Walton Beach, FL, United States, (5)University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, United States, (6)University of Florida, Ft Walton Beach, United States, (7)University of Florida, Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, Gainesville, FL, United States
Surface cobble observations at Torrey Pines State Beach, California (644352)
Hironori Matsumoto, University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, Adam Young, University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, United States and Robert T Guza, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
Comparison of spatially varying optical and in-situ surf-zone currents during large wave events (654838)
Dylan Lawrence Anderson, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN, United States and Spicer Bak, US Army Corps of Engineers, Field Research Facility, Duck, United States
Evaluating spatio-temporal dune volume changes from high resolution mobile terrestrial lidar (655563)
Ian Conery1, Nicholas Spore1, Shannon Walker2, Nicholas Cohn1, Katherine L Brodie1 and Julie C Zinnert3, (1)U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, Field Research Facility, Duck, NC, United States, (2)Virginia Commonwealth University, Biology, Richmond, VA, United States, (3)Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Biology, Richmond, VA, United States