CP52A:
Extreme Sea Levels and Coastal Flood Risk II

Session ID#: 92809

Session Description:
Extreme sea levels emerge as a combination of regional mean sea level, astronomic tides, storm surges, a dynamic wave component, and, in deltas and estuaries, river discharge. Inundation of coastal areas arises from the superposition of these components and can lead to moderate (but frequent) impacts related to tidal flooding, or devastating social, economic, and environmental consequences due to rare extreme events. The 2017 and 2018 hurricane seasons in the North Atlantic were only the latest reminders of the vulnerability of low-lying densely populated and highly developed coastlines. In order to plan effective adaptation to coastal flooding hazards it is essential to improve the understanding of the links between different sea level components, and how they are modulated by climate change and variability, individually and in combination. This session seeks contributions from studies that have: (i) examined changes in any of the sea level components outlined above and their links to climate change and variability (past and future), (ii) undertaken statistical or process-based model analyses of extreme sea levels or its individual components, (iii) assessed how changes in sea level modulate coastal flood risk, (iv) or taken an integrated approach toward flood hazard and vulnerability evaluation of complex coastal systems.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • OM - Ocean Modeling
  • PC - Past, Present and Future Climate
  • PS - Physical Oceanography: Mesoscale and Smaller
Index Terms:

1641 Sea level change [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4217 Coastal processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4546 Nearshore processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
4564 Tsunamis and storm surges [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
Primary Chair:  Thomas Wahl, University of Central Florida, Civil, Environmental and Construction Engineering & National Center for Integrated Coastal Research, Orlando, FL, United States
Co-chairs:  Sönke Dangendorf, Old Dominion University, Ocean, Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, Norfolk, United States; University of Siegen, Research Institute for Water and Environment, Siegen, Germany, William Sweet, NOAA/NOS, Silver Spring, MD, United States and Katherine Serafin, University of Florida, Geography, Ft Walton Beach, FL, United States
Primary Liaison:  Sönke Dangendorf, Old Dominion University, Ocean, Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, Norfolk, United States
Moderators:  Sönke Dangendorf, Old Dominion University, Ocean, Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, Norfolk, United States and William Sweet, NOAA/NOS, Silver Spring, MD, United States
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Sönke Dangendorf, Old Dominion University, Ocean, Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, Norfolk, United States and William Sweet, NOAA/NOS, Silver Spring, MD, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Modeling Extreme Water Levels in Puget Sound (648116)
Babak Tehranirad1, Andrew William Stevens1, Eric Grossman1, Daniel J. Nowacki1, Sean C Crosby1 and Li H Erikson2, (1)USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, (2)USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center, Santa Cruz, CA, United States
Data-driven Modeling of Global Storm Surges (643247)
Michael Getachew Tadesse, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, United States and Thomas Wahl, University of Central Florida, Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering & National Center for Integrated Coastal Research, Orlando, FL, United States
Probabilistic projections of high-tide flooding frequency in the United States during the 21st century (652027)
Philip R Thompson, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Oceanography, Honolulu, United States, Benjamin Hamlington, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO, United States, Mark A Merrifield, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States and William Sweet, NOAA/NOS, Silver Spring, MD, United States
On the Changing Pattern of Seasonal Flooding Along the U.S. East Coast (636415)
Tal Ezer, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, United States
On the key influence of remote climate variability from Tropical Cyclones, North and South Atlantic mid-latitude storms on the coast of West Africa (641587)
Julien Boucharel, LEGOS-CNRS, Toulouse, France, Rafael Almar, Laboratoire d'Etudes en Géophysique et Océanographie Spatiales (LEGOS), IRD, Toulouse, France and Elodie Kestenare, Laboratoire d’Etudes Géophysiques et d’Océanographie Spatiale, LEGOS – UMR 5566 CNES-CNRS-IRD-UPS, Toulouse, France
Predicting storm wave runup at Imperial Beach, California (647108)
Julia W Fiedler1, Adam Young2, William C O'Reilly3, Bonnie C Ludka3, Cassandra Henderson3, Robert T Guza1 and Mark A Merrifield1, (1)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, United States, (3)University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
Coral reef degradation would significantly rise U.S. coastal flooding hazards (644322)
Borja Reguero1, Curt Daron Storlazzi2, Michael w Beck3, Aaron D Cole4, James Brandon Shope3, Ann Gibbs5 and Kristen A Cumming6, (1)United States, (2)USGS Pacific Science Ctr, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, (3)University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, (4)University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, United States, (5)USGS Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, (6)USGS Geological Survey, Santa Cruz, United States
Tidally-driven interannual variation in extreme sea level probabilities in the Gulf of Maine (654193)
Hannah Elizabeth Baranes, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Geosciences, Amherst, MA, United States, Jonathan D Woodruff, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, United States, Stefan A Talke, California State Polytechnic University, San Luis Obispo, Civil and Environmental Engineering, San Luis Obispo, SC, United States, Robert E Kopp, Rutgers University New Brunswick, Institute of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, Richard Ray, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Geodesy & Geophysics Lab, Greenbelt, MD, United States and Robert M Deconto, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Geosciences, Amherst, United States