CP31A:
Human Populations and Influences in the Coastal Zone: Effects on Ocean and Human Health (OHH) III

Session ID#: 92821

Session Description:
About 40% of the world’s population lives within 100 km of the coast generating unprecedented levels of interaction among people, microbial and algal assemblages, and natural and built environments. Population growth and increasing nutrient and pollutant discharges, coupled with increasing ocean temperatures, changing rainfall patterns, acidification, and rising sea levels will only exacerbate impacts of human activities on water quality, coastal ecosystems, aquaculture, fisheries, ecosystem function, and human health. Understanding the interplay of complex ecological, microbiological, biogeochemical, and nearshore oceanographic and hydrologic processes is necessary to mitigate the impact of human influence in the ocean, and determine risks for human health and well-being. Dramatic advances have been made in molecular and genomic methods, biogeochemical processes, and in situ and autonomous sampling and analysis. However, there is need for multi-disciplinary efforts to address linkages across scales, space, and approaches.

This session invites submissions that explore impacts of human activities and climate change on coastal marine and Great Lakes ecosystems, focusing on areas which affect human and animal health (natural and anthropogenic risks), coastal recreational or commercial shellfish harvesting, ocean acidification, nutrient discharge, impacts on aquaculture and ecosystem function, and algal blooms, fish kills, shellfish pathology, and other kinds of wildlife disease. Of particular interest are topics that involve integrated approaches combining cutting edge quantitative techniques, water movement, loading and flux assessments, novel modeling approaches, mechanisms of toxicity, and active stakeholder and community engagement that promotes a broader impact of the science and dissemination of research findings.

Co-Sponsor(s):
  • MM - Microbiology and Molecular Ecology
  • SI - Social-Ocean Science Interactions and SDGs
Index Terms:

1630 Impacts of global change [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4840 Microbiology and microbial ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4855 Phytoplankton [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Frederick L Tyson, National Insitute of Environmental Health Sciences, Genes Environment and Health Branch, Research Triangle Park, NC, United States
Co-chairs:  Joshua A Steele, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Microbiology, Costa Mesa, CA, United States, Rachel Noble, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences, Chapel Hill, NC, United States and Henrietta N Edmonds, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Joshua A Steele, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Microbiology, Costa Mesa, CA, United States
Moderators:  Frederick L Tyson, National Insitute of Environmental Health Sciences, Genes Environment and Health Branch, Research Triangle Park, NC, United States and Henrietta N Edmonds, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Joshua A Steele, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Microbiology, Costa Mesa, CA, United States and Rachel Noble, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences, Chapel Hill, NC, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Developing a Predictive Understanding of Harmful Cyanobacteria Growth, Toxins Production and Comparative Toxicity across Environmental Gradients (650662)
Bryan Brooks, Baylor University, Environmental Science, Center for Reservoir and Aquatic Systems Research, Institute of Biomedical Studies, Baylor University, Waco, TX, United States, J Thad Scott, Baylor University, Biology, Center for Reservoir and Aquatic Systems Research, Waco, TX, United States and Scott C James, Baylor University, Geosciences and Mechanical Engineering, Waco, TX, United States
Does Age Increase Sensitivity to the Neuropathological Effects of the HAB Toxin Domoic Acid? (655058)
David Marcinek, University of Washingon, Radiology, Pathology, Bioengineering, Seattle, WA, United States, Alicia Hendrix, University of Washington, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, Seattle, WA, United States and Kathi A Lefebvre, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA, United States
Pseudo-nitzschia bloom dynamics in the Gulf of Maine: 2012-2016 (641570)
Suzanna Clark, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, United States; Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Katherine Hubbard, Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Saint Petersburg, FL, United States, Donald M Anderson, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Dennis Joseph McGillicuddy Jr, Woods Hole Oeanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States, David K Ralston, WHOI, Applied Ocean Physics & Engineering, Woods Hole, MA, United States and David W Townsend, University of Maine, School of Marine Sciences, Orono, ME, United States
Early life exposure and microcystin toxicity: Effects on liver health and metabolic reprogramming (651430)
Saurabh Chatterjee, University of South Carolina, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions, Columbia, SC, United States
Use of a novel ovary-on-a-chip to screen for female reproductive toxicity of microcystins (648082)
Shuo Xiao1, Jingshan Xu1, Yingzheng Wang1, Bryan Brooks2, Saurabh Chatterjee1 and Geoffrey Scott1, (1)University of South Carolina, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions, Columbia, SC, United States, (2)Baylor University, Environmental Science, Center for Reservoir and Aquatic Systems Research, Institute of Biomedical Studies, Baylor University, Waco, TX, United States
Biological-Physical Modeling to Predict the Dynamics of a Pathogenic Bacterium, Vibrio Vulnificus, in an Urbanized Estuary in Hawaiʻi (648246)
Jessica Bullington1, Grieg Steward2, Margaret Anne McManus1, Anna B Neuheimer1, Brian T Glazer2, Olivia D. Nigro3, Brian Powell4 and Craig Nelson5, (1)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, (2)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, United States, (3)Hawaii Pacific University, Department of Natural Science, Kaneohe, United States, (4)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, (5)University of Hawaii at Manoa, School of Ocean, Earth Science, and Technology, Honolulu, HI, United States
Anthropogenic activities on Lagos coastal waters: Impact on sea foods and human health (639584)
Chigozie Oramadike, Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research Victoria Island Lagos, Fish Technology and Product Development Department, Lagos, Nigeria, Olaitan Olajuyigbe, Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research Victoria Island Lagos Nigeria, Fish Technology and product development department, Lagos, Nigeria, Adesola Abraham-Olukayode, Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research Victoria Island Lagos Nigeria, Physical/Chemical Oceanography Department, Lagos, Nigeria and Olufemi Olusola, Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research Victoria Island Lagos Nigeria, Fish Technology and Product Development Department, Lagos, Nigeria
Prevalence of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus in oysters harvested in Newport Bay California (657766)
Emily Cooksey1, Amy Zimmer-Faust2, Rachel Ellen Diner3, Joshua A Steele2, John F Griffith2 and Marc Verhougstraete4, (1)University of Arizona, Community, Environment and Policy, Tucson, AZ, United States, (2)Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Microbiology, Costa Mesa, CA, United States, (3)University of California, San Diego / J. Craig Venter Institute, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (4)Univeristy of Arizona, Community, Environment and Policy, United States