CP23B:
Impacts of Microplastics on Marine Organisms and Ecosystem Health II

Session ID#: 92829

Session Description:
Plastic pollution is ubiquitous in marine environments globally and presents an environmental challenge that extends throughout food webs, threatening organism and ecosystem health. Microplastic debris is of particular concern since ingestion of synthetic particles and fibers have been documented in a variety of marine species, including the smallest of zooplankton to the largest marine mammals in the sea.

Given that organisms inhabiting coastal ecosystems are subjected to many stressors, including variations in temperature and salinity related to global climate change and chemicals present in run-off or associated with plastics themselves; we must also consider that plastic debris represents one of a myriad of anthropogenic threats. Understanding the interactions that occur within (e.g. stress response) and between organisms (e.g. trophic transfer) at different levels of biological organization in an environmentally relevant context is critical to accurately measure and predict the impacts of plastic pollution, to assess risk, and to project species resilience in the Anthropocene.

Presentations addressing these challenges in marine and estuarine organisms across taxa are welcome. The session will highlight both field and laboratory research investigating microplastic exposure in the field or laboratory and may also be considered in the context of conditions induced by global climate change, such as ocean acidification, hypoxia, increased temperature, varied salinity, or species interactions. Studies can address responses at the molecular (e.g. gene expression), organism (e.g. reproduction), or population scale.

Co-Sponsor(s):
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
  • OC - Ocean Change: Acidification and Hypoxia
Index Terms:

1635 Oceans [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4217 Coastal processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4235 Estuarine processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4251 Marine pollution [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
Primary Chair:  Dorothy Ann Horn, Portland State University, Portland, OR, United States
Co-chairs:  Samantha N. Athey, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, Susanne M Brander, Oregon State University, Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Corvallis, OR, United States and Elise F Granek, Portland State University, Environmental Science & Management, Portland, OR, United States
Primary Liaison:  Samantha N. Athey, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
Moderators:  Dorothy Ann Horn, Portland State University, Portland, OR, United States and Samantha N. Athey, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Chemistry and Biochemisty, Wilminton, NC, United States
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Susanne M Brander, Oregon State University, Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Corvallis, OR, United States and Elise F Granek, Portland State University, Environmental Science & Management, Portland, OR, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Effects of Environmentally-Relevant Concentrations of Microplastic Fibers on Pacific Mole Crab (Emerita analoga) Mortality and Reproduction (640930)
Dorothy Ann Horn, Portland State University, Portland, OR, United States, Elise F Granek, Portland State University, Environmental Science & Management, Portland, OR, United States and Clare L Steele, California State University Channel Islands, Environmental Science and Resource Management, Camarillo, CA, United States
Occurrence and Effects of Microplastics in Commercially Harvested Finfish and Shellfish in North America: Research Needs and Future Directions (639957)
Elise F Granek1, Britta Baechler2, Cheyenne Stienbarger3, Dorothy Ann Horn2, Jincy Joseph4, Alison R Taylor5 and Susanne M Brander6, (1)Portland State University, Environmental Science & Management, Portland, OR, United States, (2)Portland State University, Portland, OR, United States, (3)NOAA OAR, Silver Spring, MD, United States, (4)UNC Wilmington, United States, (5)University of North Carolina Wilmington, Biology and Marine Biology, Wilmington, NC, United States, (6)Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States
An Assessment of Microplastic Ingestion in the Commercially Important Black Sea Bass, Centropristis striata: A Lab and Field Study (656428)
Jincy Joseph1, Cheyenne Stienbarger2, Samantha N. Athey3, Bonnie Bonnie Monteleone4, Anthony L Andrady5, Wade O Watanabe1, Pamela J. Seaton3, Alison R Taylor6 and Susanne M Brander7, (1)UNC Wilmington, United States, (2)NOAA OAR, Silver Spring, MD, United States, (3)University of North Carolina Wilmington, Chemistry and Biochemisty, Wilminton, NC, United States, (4)UNC Wilmington, Wilmington, United States, (5)North Carolina State University, Chemical Engineering, Raleigh, NC, United States, (6)University of North Carolina Wilmington, Biology and Marine Biology, Wilmington, NC, United States, (7)Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States
Effects of microbial-colonized microplastic beads on the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus (642762)
Anna Palumbo1, Carola Murano1,2, Vincenzo Donnarumma3, Immacolata Castellano1, Roberta Piredda3, Erik Zettler4, Linda Amaral-Zettler4,5, Ilaria Corsi2 and Raffaella Casotti3, (1)Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, BEOM Department, Naples, Italy, (2)University of Siena, Siena, Italy, (3)Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, EMI Department, Naples, Italy, (4)NIOZ, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research and Utrecht University, Den Burg, Netherlands, (5)University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Plastic: A Potential Carbon Source for Sedimentary Biogeochemical Cycling (645914)
Kelsey Rogers1, Joan A Carreres-Calabuig1, Serguei Chiriaev2 and Nicole R Posth1, (1)University of Copenhagen, Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, København K, Denmark, (2)University of Southern Denmark, Mads Clausen Institute, Sønderborg, Denmark
Potential impacts of microplastic ingestion in Acropora cervicornis and Pseudodiploria clivosa (636528)
Cheryl Hankins, Environmental Protection Agency Gulf Breeze, Gulf Breeze, FL, United States
Prey-Size Plastics are Invading Larval Fish Nurseries (636291)
Jamison Gove1, Jonathan Whitney1,2, Margaret Anne McManus3, Joey Lecky1,4, Felipe Carvalho1, Jennifer Lynch5, Jiwei Li6, Philipp Neubauer7, Katharine Smith8, Jana Phipps1,2, Donald R Kobayashi1, Karla Balagso1,2, Emily A. Contreras1,2, Mark E. Manuel9,10, Mark A Merrifield11, Jeffrey J Polovina1, Jeffrey A Maynard12, Gregory P Asner13 and Gareth J Williams14, (1)NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, Honolulu, HI, United States, (2)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, Honolulu, HI, United States, (3)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, (4)Lynker Technologies, Leesburg, VA, United States, (5)National Institute of Standards and Technology, United States, (6)Arizona State University, Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science, Tempe, AZ, United States, (7)Dragonfly Science, Wellington, New Zealand, (8)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, United States, (9)NOAA Marine Debris Program, United States, (10)Freestone Environmental Services, Richland, United States, (11)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (12)SymbioSeas and Marine Applied Research Center, Wilmington, NC, NC, United States, (13)ASU Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science, Tempe, United States, (14)School of Ocean Sciences, Bangor University, Bangor, United Kingdom
Risk Assessment for Microplastic Exposure in the Estuarine Copepod Acartia tonsa (650960)
Jonathan Cohen1, Anna Internicola1, R. Alan Mason2 and Tobias Kukulka2, (1)University of Delaware, School of Marine Science and Policy, Lewes, DE, United States, (2)University of Delaware, School of Marine Science and Policy, Newark, DE, United States
The Effect of Microplastic on Mussel Biodeposit Sinking and Resuspension (637890)
Lyda Harris, University of Washington Seattle, Seattle, WA, United States and Emily Carrington, University of Washington Seattle Campus, Biology, Seattle, WA, United States
The influence of microplastics on mercury biogeochemistry in San Francisco Bay and Lake Erie (654199)
Katlin Bowman, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States; Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, Moss Landing, CA, United States, Carl H Lamborg, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States; University of California, Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, Alison Agather, NOAA, United States and Chad R Hammerschmidt, Wright State University Main Campus, Dayton, OH, United States
The Long-Term Effects of Microfibers on the Ecosystem Services Performed by Marine Bivalves (639877)
Eleni Christoforou1, Jan Lindstrom2, Davide Dominoni2 and Sofie Spatharis2, (1)University of Glasgow, College of Medical, Veterinary & Life Sciences (MVLS), Glasgow, United Kingdom, (2)University of Glasgow, College of Medical, Veterinary & Life Sciences, Glasgow, United Kingdom