CP41A:
Interdisciplinary Approaches for Understanding Coastal Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemical Processes and Budgets II

Session ID#: 92837

Session Description:
The coastal ocean, including estuaries, tidal wetlands, continental shelf waters, and coastal upwelling regions, is highly productive and plays a role in the global cycles of carbon and other elements that is much larger than its area would indicate. The necessity to understand coastal biogeochemical processes is increasing as human activity creates problems such as eutrophication, harmful algal blooms, and hypoxia. In addition, climate change effects, such as warming, sea-level rise, acidification, and changing streamflow, will interact with these problems in complex ways. Our understanding of the role of these changes in the coastal ocean for a larger context is also hampered as the interaction of coastal regions and shelf seas with the global oceans is often treated as a “boundary condition problem” for the respective fields of study.

We invite observational (in situ and remote sensing), modeling, and theoretical investigations that reduce knowledge gaps and uncertainties in processes and budgets related to inorganic and organic coastal carbon and biogeochemistry. Of particular interest are interdisciplinary investigations that go beyond individual systems and enhance fundamental process understanding that has implications across the coastal ocean. Studies of changes in coastal ocean carbon and biogeochemistry due to climate and anthropogenic are also encouraged.

Co-Sponsor(s):
  • OB - Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry
  • OC - Ocean Change: Acidification and Hypoxia
  • OM - Ocean Modeling
Index Terms:
Primary Chair:  Holger Brix, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute for Coastal Research, Geesthacht, Germany
Co-Chair:  Raymond Najjar, The Pennsylvania State University, Meteorology and Atmospheric Science, University Park, PA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Holger Brix, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute for Coastal Research, Geesthacht, Germany
Moderators:  Yoana G Voynova, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Geesthacht, Germany and Holger Brix, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute for Coastal Research, Geesthacht, Germany
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Holger Brix, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute for Coastal Research, Geesthacht, Germany

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Challenges in estimating primary production in estuaries (657184)
Chuanmin Hu1, Henry Briceno2, Raymond Najjar3, David C English1, Shuangling Chen4, Jennifer Cannizzaro4, Maria Herrmann3 and Jeff Absten5, (1)University of South Florida Tampa, Tampa, FL, United States, (2)Florida International University, Southeastern Environmental Research Center, Miami, FL, United States, (3)The Pennsylvania State University, Meteorology and Atmospheric Science, University Park, PA, United States, (4)University of South Florida, College of Marine Science, St. Petersburg, FL, United States, (5)Florida International University, Miami, United States
Phenology and Magnitude of Primary Production in the Eastern Bering Sea (648194)
Jens Nielsen1, Calvin W. Mordy2, Michael W Lomas3, Lisa B Eisner1 and Phyllis J Stabeno4, (1)NOAA - Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA, United States, (2)Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, Seattle, WA, United States, (3)Bigelow Lab for Ocean Sciences, East Boothbay, ME, United States, (4)NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States
Norwegian Sea Net Community Production Calculated Using O2 And CO2 Optodes on a Seaglider (653166)
Luca Possenti1, Jan Kaiser2, Matthew Humphreys2, Ingunn Skjelvan3, Socratis Loucaides4, Matthew C Mowlem5 and Liam Fernand6, (1)University of East Anglia, Environmental Science, Norwich, NR4, United Kingdom, (2)University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom, (3)Norce, Bergen, Norway, (4)National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom, (5)National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, Ocean Technology and Engineering Group, Southampton, United Kingdom, (6)Centre-for-Environment-Fisheries-and-Aquaculture-Science, Lowestoft, United Kingdom
The role of particle-triggered calcium carbonate precipitation in the coastal ocean: A significant factor to seawater carbonate chemistry? (655810)
Aleck Zhaohui Wang1, Eyal Wurgaft1, Mallory Cecile Ringham1, Shuzhen Song2, Timothy Dellapenna3, James H Churchill4, Tanya Rivlin5 and Boaz Lazar6, (1)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (2)East China Normal University, State Key Laboratory of Estuarine and Coastal Research, Shanghai, China, (3)Texas A&M University at Galveston, Galveston, TX, United States, (4)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Physical Oceanography, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (5)The Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Eilat, Israel, (6)Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Earth Sciences Institute, Jerusalem, Israel
RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CAPTURING SURFACE AND SUBSURFACE CARBONATE SYSTEM VARIABILITY IN U.S. COASTAL AND CORAL ECOSYSTEMS (647412)
Sophie N Chu1,2, Adrienne J Sutton2, Burke R Hales3, Derek Manzello4, John Buchanan Mickett5, Julio M Morell6, Jan A Newton7, Scott Noakes8, Mark D Ohman9, Virginia C Parker10, Christopher Sabine11, Joseph Salisbury II12, Uwe Send13, Douglas C Vandemark14 and Treasure A Warren15, (1)University of Washington, Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean and Ecosystem Studies, Seattle, WA, United States, (2)NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States, (3)Oregon State Univ, Corvallis, OR, United States, (4)CIMAS, Miami, FL, United States, (5)Applied Physics Laboratory University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States, (6)University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez, Caribbean Coastal Ocean Observing System, Mayaguez, PR, United States, (7)University of Washington, Applied Physics Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States, (8)The University of Georgia, Center for Applied Isotope Studies, Athens, GA, United States, (9)University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (10)Washington College, United States, (11)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, United States, (12)University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, United States, (13)University of California, San Diego, CA, United States, (14)University of New Hampshire Main Campus, Durham, NH, United States, (15)University of California Davis, United States
Carbon Flux and Blue Carbon Potential of Seagrass Ecosystems in the Anthropocene (654148)
Richard Carl Zimmerman1, Matthew Herman Long2, David Burdige3, Victoria J Hill4, Brian Collister1, Kazi Aminul Islam5, Jiang Li6, Megan Coffer7 and Blake A Schaeffer8, (1)Old Dominion University, Ocean, Earth, & Atmospheic Sciences, Norfolk, VA, United States, (2)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (3)Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, United States, (4)Old Dominion University, Ocean, Earth, & Atmospheric Science, Norfolk, VA, United States, (5)Old Dominion University, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Norfolk, United States, (6)Old Dominion University, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Norfolk, VA, United States, (7)Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, United States, (8)Environmental Protection Agency, NERL Exposure Methods and Measurement Division, Research Triangle Park, NC, United States
Seasonal Productivity Estimates from the Diurnal Oxygen Budget in Two Subtropical Estuaries (654192)
Raymond Najjar1, Maria Herrmann2, Henry Briceno3, Chuanmin Hu4, Jeff Absten5, Breege Boyer5 and David C English6, (1)Pennsylvania State University Main Campus, University Park, PA, United States, (2)The Pennsylvania State University, Meteorology and Atmospheric Science, University Park, PA, United States, (3)Florida International University, Southeastern Environmental Research Center, Miami, FL, United States, (4)University of South Florida St. Petersburg, Optical Oceanography, St Petersburg, FL, United States, (5)Florida International University, Miami, United States, (6)University of South Florida Tampa, Tampa, FL, United States
Harnessing autonomous technologies and discrete water sampling to investigate the role of high pCO2 river inputs on coastal acidification: A case study from the Belize River and Mesoamerican Barrier Reef. (654650)
Sarah Cryer1, Peter Brown2, Filipa Carvalho2, Terry Wood2, Gilbert Andrews3, Samir Rosado3, Arlene Young3, Richard Lampitt2, Socratis Loucaides2, Richard Sanders4 and Claire Evans5, (1)University of Southampton, Ocean and Earth Sciences, Southampton, United Kingdom, (2)National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom, (3)Coastal Zone Management Authority and Institute, Belize City, Belize, (4)Norwegian Research Centre and Bjerknes Climate Change Centre, Climate, Bergen, Norway, (5)National Oceanography Centre Southampton, Ocean Biogeochemistry and Ecosystems, Southampton, United Kingdom