CP53C:
Connections Between Coral Reef State, Physical Processes, and Coastlines I

Session ID#: 92845

Session Description:
With more than 100 million people living less than 10 m above sea level and within 10 km of coral reefs, the changes to coral reefs that are being observed around the world will have a direct impact on many coastal communities. Geophysical features such as the complex bathymetry, the health and changing composition of coral reef platforms through time, as well as physical processes such as waves and currents, not only influence the coral reef ecosystem but also the evolution of the adjacent shorelines with ramifications for coastal erosion, flooding and habitability. This session aims to consider what the future may look like for coral reef-lined coasts by exploring the dynamic connections between coral reef health, physical processes (hydrodynamics and sediment transport), the evolution of the adjacent shoreline and coastal flooding. Summaries of current site-specific studies, regional investigations, modeling results, and efforts towards multi-disciplinary and integrated approaches to understanding the current and future state of coral reefs, and how this affects physical processes as well as the adjacent coastline are all encouraged, along with presentations on new and experimental techniques that may improve or change the way these dynamic connections and processes are understood.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • IS - Ocean Observatories, Instrumentation and Sensing Technologies
  • MG - Marine Geology and Sedimentology
  • SI - Social-Ocean Science Interactions and SDGs
Index Terms:

3022 Marine sediments: processes and transport [MARINE GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS]
4534 Hydrodynamic modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
4546 Nearshore processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
4558 Sediment transport [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
Primary Chair:  Andrew William Mackay Pomeroy, The University of Western Australia, Oceans Graduate School, Crawley, Australia; Australian Institute of Marine Science, Perth, Australia; University of Western Australia, The UWA Oceans Institute, Crawley, WA, Australia
Co-chairs:  Curt Daron Storlazzi, USGS Pacific Science Ctr, Santa Cruz, CA, United States and Ap Van Dongeren, Deltares, Delft, Netherlands
Primary Liaison:  Andrew William Mackay Pomeroy, University of Western Australia, The UWA Oceans Institute, Crawley, WA, Australia; The University of Western Australia, Oceans Graduate School, Crawley, Australia; Australian Institute of Marine Science, Perth, Australia
Moderators:  Andrew William Mackay Pomeroy, University of Western Australia, The UWA Oceans Institute, Crawley, WA, Australia and Curt Daron Storlazzi, USGS Pacific Science Ctr, Santa Cruz, CA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Andrew William Mackay Pomeroy, University of Western Australia, The UWA Oceans Institute, Crawley, WA, Australia and Ap Van Dongeren, Deltares, Delft, Netherlands

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Hydrodynamics on Fringing Reef Systems with Spur and Groove Structures (644802)
Cesar Acevedo1, Wayne J Stephenson1, Ismael Marino-Tapia2 and Sarah Wakes3, (1)University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, (2)Escuela Nacional de Estudios Superiores (ENES-Merida), Merida, YC, Mexico, (3)University of Otago, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Dunedin, New Zealand
The Influence of a Cross-Reef Channel on Wave Setup and Circulation over a Fringing Reef at Ipan, Guam, Revisited (637414)
Janet M Becker1, Jeanette Clark2, Mark A Merrifield3 and James Behrens1, (1)University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)University of California Santa Barbara, National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, Santa Barbara, CA, United States, (3)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
Reconciling Reef Representations: A Comparison of Obstacle and Surface Models, and Consequences for Drag (637907)
Melissa Duvall, Duke University, Durham, NC, United States, Johanna H Rosman, Univ. N. Carolina Chapel Hill, Morehead City, NC, United States and James L Hench, Duke University, Nicholas School of the Environment, Beaufort, NC, United States
Extending Coral Reef Elevation-Change Studies from Regional- to Centimeter-Scale with a New High-resolution, Underwater Imaging System (651570)
David G Zawada1, Gerald A Hatcher2, Christine Kranenburg3, Andrew C Ritchie2, Jonathan A Warrick4, Ryan Kaye Moyer1 and Evan Dailey2, (1)USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, Saint Petersburg, FL, United States, (2)USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center, CA, United States, (3)USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St Petersburg, FL, United States, (4)USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center, Santa Cruz, CA, United States
A coral reef surfzone: The dynamics of wavy flows on a shallow reef flat (644935)
Stephen G Monismith1, Samantha Allysa Maticka1, Justin Rogers2, Benjamin Brian Hefner3 and Clifton Brock Woodson4, (1)Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States, (2)Stanford University, Stanford, United States, (3)University of Georgia, Athens, GA, United States, (4)University of Georgia, Athens, United States
A Hybrid Approach to Develop Runup Parameterisations for Reef-Lined Coasts (652092)
Gemma Louise Franklin1,2 and Alec Torres-Freyermuth1,3, (1)Laboratorio Nacional de Resiliencia Costera, Sisal, YC, Mexico, (2)CONACYT - Laboratorio de Ingenieria y Procesos Costeros, Instituto de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Sisal, YC, Mexico, (3)Laboratorio de Ingenieria y Procesos Costeros, Instituto de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Sisal, Mexico
West Maui – A Stellar Example of Spatial Variability of the Wave-Driven Components of Runup and Inundation (647977)
Camilla Tognacchini, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, Martin D. Guiles, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, United States, Assaf Azouri, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, United States, Volker Roeber, University Pau & Pays Adour, Pau, France and Douglas S Luther, Univ Hawaii Manoa, Honolulu, HI, United States
Numerical modeling of the performance of coral reef restoration projects to enhance wave energy dissipation and decrease coastal flooding (647021)
Miguel Canals, University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez, Center for Applied Ocean Sciences and Engineering, Mayaguez, PR, United States and Edwin Hernandez, University of Puerto Rico Rio Piedras Campus, San Juan, PR, United States