PC12A:
Climate Impacts on Marine Species II

Session ID#: 92890

Session Description:
The marine environment is disproportionately impacted by climate
change, as evidenced through increasing water temperature, ocean
acidification, deoxygenation, rising sea levels, shifting circulation
patterns and increased storm activity. We invite presentations that
explore the observed or modeled response of marine organisms to
climate variability or climate change. Recent studies have revealed
climate-mediated declines in some marine species, while others have
shown remarkable resilience to climate change. For example, Arctic sea
ice loss threatens species that rely on ice for habitat such as polar
bears and ringed seals, whereas tuna species that target moderate sea
surface temperatures may experience range expansion. Ecological
impacts can derive from changes in physiology, bioenergetics,
abundance, distribution, habitat, community structure, reproduction,
behavior, and phenology. A wide range of marine organisms will be
considered, including invertebrates, fish, reptiles, mammals, and sea
birds. We also invite presentations that explore climate impacts on
marine fisheries in terms of spatial distribution, changing target
species and/or gear type, or simply the challenges faced by fisheries
management in a changing climate. This session will showcase observed
and predicted responses of marine organisms to climate change and
provide a venue for researchers to contrast climate-driven phenomena
across regions and taxa.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • HE - High Latitude Environments
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
Index Terms:

1616 Climate variability [GLOBAL CHANGE]
1620 Climate dynamics [GLOBAL CHANGE]
1630 Impacts of global change [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4817 Food webs, structure, and dynamics [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4830 Higher trophic levels [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4830 Higher trophic levels [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Erin Meyer-Gutbrod, University of California, Santa Barbara, Marine Science Institute, Santa Barbara, CA, United States
Co-chairs:  Kristin Liisa Laidre, Applied Physics Laboratory University of Washington, Polar Science Center, Seattle, WA, United States, Barbara Muhling, University of California - Santa Cruz, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, San Diego, CA, United States and Vincent S Saba, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Princeton, NJ, United States
Primary Liaison:  Erin Meyer-Gutbrod, University of California, Santa Barbara, Marine Science Institute, Santa Barbara, CA, United States
Moderators:  Vincent S Saba, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Princeton, NJ, United States and Barbara Muhling, University of California - Santa Cruz, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, San Diego, CA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Vincent S Saba, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Princeton, NJ, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

The Synergistic Effect of Climate Change and Fishing on Multiple Populations of Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua). (652170)
Camilla Sguotti1, Saskia Otto1, Romain Frelat1, Tom Langbehn2, Marie Plambech Ryberg3, Martin Lindegren3, Joel Durant4, Nils Christian Stenseth5 and Christian Möllmann1, (1)University of Hamburg, Institute for Marine Ecosystem and Fishery Science, Center for Earth System Research and Sustainability (CEN), Hamburg, Germany, (2)University of Bergen, Department of Biological Sciences, Bergen, Norway, (3)National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark (DTU Aqua), Lyngby, Denmark, (4)University of Oslo, CEES / Department of Biosciences, Oslo, Norway, (5)University of Oslo, CEES, Department of Biosciences, Oslo, Norway
Changes in Stock Productivity: a Tale of Two Coasts (641549)
Rich Bell, United States, Adrien Tableau, __, France and Jeremy Collie, Graduate School of Oceanography/University of Rhode Island, United States
Climate Change Decreases in Global Fisheries Production Vary by Size And Functional Type (654097)
Colleen Petrik, Texas A & M, Department of Oceanography, College Station, TX, United States, Charles A Stock, NOAA/GFDL, Princeton, NJ, United States, Ken H Andersen, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Aqua, Kgs Lyngby, Denmark, Daniel Daniël van Denderen, Denmark Technical University, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark and James Roger Watson, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States
How Do Changes in Species-Specific Habitat Affect Predator-Prey Overlap? (651782)
Lis Elisabeth Henderson, Stony Brook Univeristy, SoMAS, Stony Brook, NY, United States and Janet Nye, Stony Brook University, NY, United States
Impacts of temperature changes in the Northwest Atlantic on apparent distribution shifts of Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) (647163)
Kyle Oliveira1, Lisa A Kerr2, Andrew Allyn2 and Andrew J Pershing2, (1)United States, (2)Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME, United States
Past and future shifts in the distribution of fisheries for juvenile albacore in the eastern North Pacific Ocean (644552)
Barbara Muhling, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, La Jolla, CA, United States; University of California - Santa Cruz, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, San Diego, CA, United States and Desiree Tommasi, University of California Santa Cruz and NOAA SWFSC, La Jolla, CA, United States
The devil is in the details: The effect of spatial scale of fishery and environmental data on the performance of fish habitat models (645137)
Ismael Núñez Riboni, Anna Akimova and Anne Sell, Johann Heinrich von Thünen Institute, Bremerhaven, Germany
The influence of climate and habitat on the distribution and ecology of coastal and pelagic fish species in the North Atlantic using joint modeling (639772)
Sarah Roberts, Duke University, Marine Geospatial Ecology Lab, Durham, NC, United States; Duke University, Marine Geospatial Ecology Lab, Durham, United States