PC13A:
Climate Impacts on Marine Species III

Session ID#: 92894

Session Description:
The marine environment is disproportionately impacted by climate
change, as evidenced through increasing water temperature, ocean
acidification, deoxygenation, rising sea levels, shifting circulation
patterns and increased storm activity. We invite presentations that
explore the observed or modeled response of marine organisms to
climate variability or climate change. Recent studies have revealed
climate-mediated declines in some marine species, while others have
shown remarkable resilience to climate change. For example, Arctic sea
ice loss threatens species that rely on ice for habitat such as polar
bears and ringed seals, whereas tuna species that target moderate sea
surface temperatures may experience range expansion. Ecological
impacts can derive from changes in physiology, bioenergetics,
abundance, distribution, habitat, community structure, reproduction,
behavior, and phenology. A wide range of marine organisms will be
considered, including invertebrates, fish, reptiles, mammals, and sea
birds. We also invite presentations that explore climate impacts on
marine fisheries in terms of spatial distribution, changing target
species and/or gear type, or simply the challenges faced by fisheries
management in a changing climate. This session will showcase observed
and predicted responses of marine organisms to climate change and
provide a venue for researchers to contrast climate-driven phenomena
across regions and taxa.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • HE - High Latitude Environments
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
Index Terms:

1616 Climate variability [GLOBAL CHANGE]
1620 Climate dynamics [GLOBAL CHANGE]
1630 Impacts of global change [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4817 Food webs, structure, and dynamics [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4830 Higher trophic levels [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4830 Higher trophic levels [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Erin Meyer-Gutbrod, University of California, Santa Barbara, Marine Science Institute, Santa Barbara, CA, United States
Co-chairs:  Vincent S Saba, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Princeton, NJ, United States, Kristin Liisa Laidre, Applied Physics Laboratory University of Washington, Polar Science Center, Seattle, WA, United States and Barbara Muhling, University of California - Santa Cruz, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, San Diego, CA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Erin Meyer-Gutbrod, University of California, Santa Barbara, Marine Science Institute, Santa Barbara, CA, United States
Moderators:  Vincent S Saba, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Princeton, NJ, United States and Barbara Muhling, University of California - Santa Cruz, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, San Diego, CA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Barbara Muhling, University of California - Santa Cruz, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, San Diego, CA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Defining indices of ecosystem variability using biological samples of fish communities: a generalization of empirical orthogonal functions (491791)
James Thorson, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA, United States, Lorenzo Ciannelli, Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States and Michael Litzow, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United States
Energetic Costs of Acidification, Hypoxia, and Warming in Early Life Stages of a Coastal Fish (651845)
Teresa Grace Schwemmer, Stony Brook University, SoMAS, Stony Brook, NY, United States, Hannes Baumann, University of Connecticut, Marine Sciences, Groton, CT, United States, Christopher S Murray, University of Washington, United States and Janet Nye, Stony Brook University, NY, United States
Climate change impacts on growth and migration of Japanese anchovy (Engraulis japonicus) in the East China Sea and its uncertainties. (645392)
Shin-ichi Ito1, Takashi Setou2, Michio Yoneda3, Masahiro Nakamura3, Hajime Kitano3, Michiya Matsuyama4, Chenying Guo5, Megumi Enomoto5, Tomoya Aono5, Takashi Kitagawa5, Motomitsu Takahashi6 and Taketo Hashioka7, (1)The University of Tokyo, Earthquake Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan, (2)National Research Institute of Fisheries Science, Japan, (3)Japan Fisheries Research and Education Agency, Japan, (4)Kyushu University, Japan, (5)The University of Tokyo, Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, Japan, (6)Seikai National Fisheries Research Institute, Nagasaki, Japan, (7)JAMSTEC, Research Institute of Global Change, Yokohama, Japan
A Regional Assessment of Dungeness Crab Vulnerability to Global Change: Insights from Model Projections (652905)
Halle Berger1, Samantha Siedlecki1, Catherine Matassa2, Simone R Alin3, Isaac Kaplan4, Emma Hodgson5, Darren Pilcher6 and Jan A Newton7, (1)University of Connecticut, Marine Sciences, Groton, CT, United States, (2)University of Connecticut, Marine Sciences, Groton, United States, (3)NOAA, Seattle, WA, United States, (4)NOAA NWFSC, Seattle, WA, United States, (5)Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada, (6)Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States, (7)University of Washington, Applied Physics Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States
The brighter side of climate change: How local oceanography amplified a lobster boom in the Gulf of Maine (643399)
Andrew Goode1, Damian C Brady2, Robert Steneck2 and Richard Wahle3, (1)Student, University of Maine, School of Marine Sciences, Walpole, ME, United States, (2)University of Maine, School of Marine Sciences, Walpole, ME, United States, (3)Darling Marine Center, University of Maine, Walpole, ME, United States
Climate Change and Diversity of Fishes and Invertebrates along a Subtropical Coast (639051)
Masami Fujiwara, Texas A&M University, Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, College Station, TX, United States and Fernando Martinez-Andrade, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Coastal Fisheries Division, Corpus Christi, TX, United States
Climate-driven collapse of mussel beds (Mytilus californianus) in the Southern California Bight and the twilight of a keystone interaction. (653115)
Corey Garza, California State University Monterey Bay, Marine Science, Seaside, CA, United States
Intertidal predator-prey interactions within the context of a changing coastal ocean (652019)
Brittany Jellison1, Katie Bacall1, Brittany Hernandez2, Michele LaVigne2 and David Carlon1, (1)Bowdoin College, Schiller Coastal Studies Center and Department of Biology, Brunswick, ME, United States, (2)Bowdoin College, Department of Earth and Oceanographic Science, Brunswick, ME, United States