PC33A:
Long-Term Changes of the Deep-Ocean Overturning Circulation: Past and Future I

Session ID#: 92910

Session Description:
As a key component of the climate system, the deep-ocean overturning circulation, with its interconnected branches in the Atlantic, Indian, Pacific, and Southern Oceans regulates the global transport of heat, freshwater and carbon. Paleo-reconstructions indicate that long-term variations in the meridional overturning circulation (MOC), from centennial, millennial, to even longer timescales, have played a pivotal role in past climate changes. Nevertheless, an understanding of the mechanisms that drive these long-term variations remains a major challenge in climate research. Our ability to predict future MOC variability and anthropogenic climate change, meanwhile, depends critically on our understanding of the mechanisms of MOC variability during past climatic changes. This interdisciplinary session aims to bring together theoretical, modeling and observational studies, as well as novel methodologies that combine above approaches, to study the spatial-temporal structures, mechanisms, and impacts of long-term changes of the MOC in the past and future.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • HE - High Latitude Environments
  • OM - Ocean Modeling
  • PL - Physical Oceanography: Mesoscale and Larger
Index Terms:

1620 Climate dynamics [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4901 Abrupt/rapid climate change [PALEOCEANOGRAPHY]
4928 Global climate models [PALEOCEANOGRAPHY]
4962 Thermohaline [PALEOCEANOGRAPHY]
Primary Chair:  Wei Liu, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA, United States
Co-chairs:  Zhengyu Liu, Ohio State University Main Campus, Columbus, OH, United States, Malte Jansen, University of Chicago, Department of the Geophysical Sciences, Chicago, IL, United States and Sophia Hines, Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, United States
Primary Liaison:  Wei Liu, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA, United States
Moderators:  Wei Liu, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA, United States and Malte Jansen, University of Chicago, Department of the Geophysical Sciences, Chicago, IL, United States
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Zhengyu Liu, The Ohio State University, Department of Geography, Columbus, United States and Sophia Hines, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Glacial overturning circulation structure and Agulhas Leakage from Nd isotope and K/Ar measurements in the Cape Basin (652381)
Sophia Hines1, Allison M Franzese2,3, Chiza N Mwinde4, Steven L Goldstein5, Christopher D Charles6, Ian R Hall7 and Sidney R Hemming5, (1)Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY, United States, (2)CUNY Hostos Community College, Natural Sciences, Bronx, NY, United States, (3)Organization Not Listed, Washington, United States, (4)Smith College, Northampton, MA, United States, (5)Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, United States, (6)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (7)Cardiff University, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Cardiff, United Kingdom
Role of Antarctic sea ice on deep ocean circulation and ventilation in glacial-interglacial climates (653337)
Sandy O Gregorio, University of Quebec at Rimouski UQAR, ISMER, Rimouski, QC, Canada, Louis-Philippe Nadeau, University of Quebec at Rimouski UQAR, Rimouski, QC, Canada, Raffaele M Ferrari, MIT, Cambridge, United States and Jonathan Maitland Lauderdale, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Cambridge, MA, United States
Multiple proxies needed to reconstruct the Atlantic Water Masses and AMOC during the Last Glacial Maximum (644840)
Sifan Gu1, Zhengyu Liu2, Delia Oppo3, Jean Lynch-Stieglitz4, Alexandra Jahn5, Jiaxu Zhang6 and Lixin Wu1, (1)Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China, (2)The Ohio State University, Department of Geography, Columbus, United States, (3)WHOI, Geology and Geophysics, Woods Hole, United States, (4)Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Atlanta, GA, United States, (5)University of Colorado at Boulder, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and INSTAAR, Boulder, CO, United States, (6)Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, United States
North Atlantic radiocarbon constraints on ocean circulation over the last deglaciation (656448)
Andrea Burke1, James William Buchanan Rae2, Rosanna Greenop2, Paula J Reimer3 and Tim Heaton4, (1)University of St Andrews, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, St Andrews, KY16, United Kingdom, (2)University of St Andrews, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, St Andrews, United Kingdom, (3)Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, BT9, United Kingdom, (4)University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom
Indo-Pacific Control on Ocean Overturning Across Climates (649773)
Jess F Adkins, California Institute of Technology, Geological and Planetary Sciences, Pasadena, CA, United States, Emily Rose Newsom, California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Pasadena, CA, United States, Eric Galbraith, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vall├Ęs (Bellaterra), Spain and Andrew F Thompson, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, United States
Mechanisms and Impacts of a Partial AMOC Recovery Under Enhanced Freshwater Forcing (654645)
Matthew David Thomas, UCAR Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, United States and Alexey V Fedorov, Yale University, New Haven, United States
Air-sea interaction amplifies the AMOC response to global warming (644551)
Oluwayemi A. Garuba1, Wilbert Weijer2 and Philip J Rasch1, (1)Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, United States, (2)Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, United States