MM24A:
Marine Microbes in the Omics Epoch: Unveiling Their Critical Roles in the Pelagic and Benthic Environments IV Posters

Session ID#: 92940

Session Description:
Marine microorganisms - bacteria, viruses, phytoplankton, and protists have diverse interactions that  define large-scale processes, such as nutrient cycling, gas fluxes with the atmosphere, and energy flow through marine food webs. The complexity of microbial communities in ocean habitats, including planktonic, benthic and host-associated environments demands deeper exploration in order to unveil the critical roles that microbes play in shaping marine ecosystems. Symbiosis (i.e., mutualism, parasitism, commensalism), predation, mixotrophy, allelopathy and competition are some of the complex biological interactions that can significantly drive the ecology and evolution of these important microbial players. Advances in molecular technologies (genomics, metabolomics, genetic engineering), cutting-edge methods in microbiology (microfluidics, microscopy), laboratory model systems development, time series studies and modeling offer new ways to describe the linkages between specific microbial players and their surrounding environment. We invite studies that investigate these wide-ranging interactions, from microbe-microbe, microbe-organic matter to host-microbe interactions, to further explore microbial impacts on trophic transfer of chemical compounds, atmospheric gas fluxes, transformations of organic matter and nutrients, biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem health. Studies that develop emerging technologies and models that shed light to these cryptic interactions are also encouraged.
Index Terms:

4805 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4840 Microbiology and microbial ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4850 Marine organic chemistry [OCEANOGRAPHY: CHEMICAL]
4872 Symbiosis [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Marilou Sison-Mangus, University of California Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States
Co-chairs:  Linda Wegley Kelly, San Diego State University, Department of Biology, San Diego, United States, Craig Nelson, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, Honolulu, HI, United States and Shady A Amin, New York University Abu Dhabi, Biology, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Primary Liaison:  Marilou Sison-Mangus, University of California Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
A marine bacterium produces three different factors that stimulate animal metamorphosis (635946)
Amanda Therese Alker1, Nathalie Delherbe2, Trevor Purdy3, Bradley S Moore4 and Nicholas Shikuma1, (1)San Diego State University, Cell and Molecular Biology, San Diego, CA, United States, (2)San Diego State University, Department of Biology, San Diego, CA, United States, (3)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (4)University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
 
Prophages in Host-Associated Microbes: The Most Abundant Symbiosis on Earth and Its Relevance in Marine Holobionts (648214)
Mark Little, SDSU, San Diego, CA, United States, Maria Isabel Rojas, SDSU, Biology, San Diego, CA, United States and Forest Rohwer, San Diego State University, Biology, San Diego, CA, United States
 
De novo-assisted peptidomics helps in the study of marine carbon flux and protein degradation (654780)
Megan E Duffy1, Jamee Adams2, Jacquelyn A Neibauer1, Clara A Fuchsman3 and Richard G Keil1, (1)University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States, (2)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, United States, (3)University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Horn Point Laboratory, Cambridge, MD, United States
 
Diel Gene Expression of Eukaryotic Microplankton in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre: Metatranscriptomic Windows into Temporal Function, Ecology, and Evolution of Uncultured Microbes (653626)
Ryan D Groussman1, Sacha Coesel1, Bryndan Paige Durham2, Rhonda Morales1 and Virginia Armbrust1, (1)University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States, (2)University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, United States
 
Population dynamics of SAR11 marine bacteria across a temporally-sampled nearshore to open ocean transect (637900)
Sarah J Tucker1, Kelle C Freel1, Elizabeth A. Monaghan1, Clarisse E.S. Sullivan1,2, Oscar Ramfelt1,2, Evelyn GE Hoffman3, Yoshimi M Rii1,4 and Michael S Rappe5, (1)Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Kāneʻohe, HI, United States, (2)University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, HI, United States, (3)Smith College, Biological Sciences, Northampton, MA, United States, (4)He‘eia National Estuarine Research Reserve, Kāneʻohe, HI, United States, (5)Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Kāneʻohe, United States
 
Specific marine bacteria enhance the sexual reproduction and auxospore production of a marine diatom (649885)
Marilou Sison-Mangus and Michael Kempnich, University of California Santa Cruz, Ocean Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States
 
In Situ Viral Dynamics off the Coast of Southern California using Transcriptomes from Automated High-Frequency Sampling (647417)
Delaney Nolin1, David Needham2, Julio Cesar Ignacio Espinoza3, Shengwei Hou4, Erin Biers Fichot4, Colette Fletcher-Hoppe4, Melody Aleman4 and Jed A Fuhrman4, (1)United States, (2)Asahikawa,Hokkaido, Japan, (3)University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States, (4)University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States
 
Algae and Associated Viruses in a Marine-Derived Antarctic Lake (651953)
Silvia Cretoiu1, David Paez-Espino2, Frederik Schulz2, Tanja Woyke3, Benjamin S Twining4 and Joaquin Martinez-Martinez5, (1)United States, (2)DOE Joint Genome Institute, United States, (3)DOE Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, CA, United States, (4)Bigelow Lab for Ocean Sciences, East Boothbay, ME, United States, (5)Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, East Boothbay, ME, United States
 
Characterization and Variation of the Olympia Oyster (Ostrea lurida) Gut Microbiome (648375)
Emily Kunselman, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Marine Biology Research Division, La Jolla, United States
 
Chytrids Exhibit Trophic Versatility in Their Interactions with a Microalga (644705)
Christopher Ward1, Laura T Carney2, Joyce E Longcore3, Jeff Kimbrel4, Michael P Thelen5 and Rhona Stuart5, (1)Bowling Green State University, Biological Sciences, Bowling Green, OH, United States, (2)Heliae Development, LLC, Gilbert, AZ, United States, (3)University of Maine, Orono, ME, United States, (4)Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, United States, (5)Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, United States
 
Effects of Future Ocean Conditions on the Microbiome of Crustose Coralline Algae with Implications for Coral Settlement and Growth (652868)
Wesley Sparagon1, Brenna Carroll1, Craig E Nelson1, Christopher P. Jury2, Robert J Toonen3 and Ariana Huffmyer2, (1)University of Hawaii at Manoa, Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education, Honolulu, HI, United States, (2)University of Hawaii, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, SOEST, Honolulu, HI, United States, (3)University of Hawaii, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, Kaneohe, HI, United States
 
Epidermal Microbiome Structure of Leopard Sharks (Triakis semifasciata) Across Spatial and Temporal Scales (656452)
Colton Johnson1, Michael P Doane2, Asha Goodman1, Zachary Quinlan3, Abigail C Turnlund1, Emma Nicole Kerr1, Jennifer Moffatt4, Melissa Torres5, Andrew P Nosal6, Catarina Pien7, David A Ebert7, Michael B Reed8, Meredith H Peterson1, Shaili Johri1, Isabella G Livingston1 and Elizabeth A Dinsdale9, (1)San Diego State University, Biology, San Diego, CA, United States, (2)Sydney Institute of Marine Science, Sydney, NSW, Australia, (3)San Diego State University, Department of Biology, San Diego, CA, United States, (4)Birch Aquarium, La Jolla, United States, (5)Birch Aquarium, La Jolla, CA, United States, (6)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (7)Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, Moss Landing, CA, United States, (8)San Diego State University, Biological and Medical Informatics, San Diego, CA, United States, (9)San Diego State University, Ecology, San Diego, CA, United States
 
EVIDENCE OF NITRIFICATION ASSOCIATED WITH JELLYFISH (639039)
Nathan Hubot1, Sari Lou Carolin Giering2, Cathy Lucas1, Julie Robidart3 and Jessika Fuessel1, (1)University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom, (2)National Oceanography Centre Southampton, Ocean Biogeochemistry and Ecosystems, Southampton, United Kingdom, (3)National Oceanography Centre Southampton, Ocean Technology and Engineering, Southampton, United Kingdom
 
High-Throughput Isolation of novel viruses infecting fastidious and ecologically important bacteria from the Western English Channel (650023)
Holger Buchholz1, Ben Temperton1, Michelle Michelsen1 and Mike Allen2, (1)University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom, (2)Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Plymouth, United Kingdom
 
Inorganic Carbon Assimilation via Chloroplasts in the Aphotic-Dwelling Kleptoplastidic Foraminifer Nonionella stella (657144)
Joan M Bernhard, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Geology & Geophysics Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Fatma Gomaa, Harvard University, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Cambridge, MA, United States, Daniel R. Utter, Harvard University, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology,, Cambridge, MA, United States and Ying Zhang, University of Rhode Island, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Kingston, RI, United States
 
Interkingdom signaling molecule leads to genomic instability in Emiliania huxleyi causing cell cycle arrest without mortality: Do bacteria use chemical signals to exploit eukaryotic cells? (645942)
Scott Pollara1, Jamie Becker1, Brook L Nunn2, Grayton Downing1, Ellysia Overton1, Davis Chase1, Elizabeth Harvey3 and Kristen Whalen1, (1)Haverford College, Biology, Haverford, PA, United States, (2)University of Washington, Department of Genome Sciences, Seattle, United States, (3)University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, United States
 
Linking light-dependent life history traits with population dynamics for Prochlorococcus and cyanophage (650237)
David Jean Robert Demory1, Riyue Liu2, Yue Chen3, Fangxin Zhao3, Ashley Coenen4, Qinglu Zeng5 and Joshua S Weitz1, (1)Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Biological Sciences, Atlanta, GA, United States, (2)The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Division of Life Science, Hong Kong, (3)The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Department of Ocean Science, Hong Kong, (4)Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Physics, United States, (5)The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Division of Life Science and Department of Ocean Science, Hong Kong
 
Mathematical modeling of the coral microbiome: the influence of temperature and microbial network (656413)
Lais Lima1, Maya Weissman2, Michaeal Reed3, NP Bhavya4, Amanda Therese Alker5, Megan M Morris6, Rob Edwards7, Samantha J de Putron8, Naveen Vaidya7 and Elizabeth A Dinsdale9, (1)San Diego State University, Biology, San Diego, CA, United States, (2)San Diego State University, United States, (3)San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, United States, (4)National Center for Genome Analysis Support (NCGAS), United States, (5)San Diego State University, Cell and Molecular Biology, San Diego, CA, United States, (6)Stanford University, Biology, Stanford, CA, United States, (7)San Diego State University, San Diego, United States, (8)Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, St. Georges, Bermuda, (9)San Diego State University, Ecology, San Diego, CA, United States
 
Mechanistic Model of B12-based Syntrophy Between Thalassiosira pseudonana and Ruegeria pomeroyi (644228)
Helena van Tol, University of Washington Seattle Campus, School of Oceanography, Seattle, United States and E. Virginia Armbrust, University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States
 
Skin Microbiome of the Round Stingray, Urobatis halleri, in Southern California (656290)
Emma Nicole Kerr1, Miranda Haggerty2, Meredith H Peterson1, Colton Johnson1, Asha Goodman1, Shaili Johri1, Michael P Doane3, Megan M Morris4, Lais Lima1, Abigail C Turnlund1, Isabella G Livingston1, Hayden A Bursch1 and Elizabeth A Dinsdale5, (1)San Diego State University, Biology, San Diego, CA, United States, (2)State of California, Fish and Wildlife, San Diego, CA, United States, (3)Sydney Institute of Marine Science, Sydney, NSW, Australia, (4)Stanford University, Biology, Stanford, CA, United States, (5)San Diego State University, Ecology, San Diego, CA, United States
 
The bacterial quorum sensing molecule 2-heptyl-4-quinolone physiological mode of action in Emiliania huxleyi controls critical pathways fundamental to algal metabolism and cell division (645818)
Kristen Whalen1, Scott Pollara1, Jamie Becker1, Brook L Nunn2, Grayton Downing1, Ellysia Overton1, Davis Chase1 and Elizabeth Harvey3, (1)Haverford College, Biology, Haverford, PA, United States, (2)University of Washington, Department of Genome Sciences, Seattle, United States, (3)University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, United States
 
The GALT Prospector™: A Novel Platform for Automated High-Throughput Cultivation and Isolation of Microorganisms (654355)
Vega Shah, Crystal L Emery, Andre Mueller, Maria Villancio-Wolter, Alexander J Hallock and Peter Christey, GALT Inc, San Carlos, CA, United States