MM31A:
Microbial Genomics to Improve Predictive Understanding of Disturbance in the Global Ocean System I

Session ID#: 92944

Session Description:
Microorganisms represent a vast reservoir of metabolic potential and they mediate biogeochemical cycles in the global ocean. As such, they play a critical role in the response of marine ecosystems to perturbations, such as oil spills, catastrophic storms or climate change. Next generation sequencing, advanced bioinformatics tools, and the extensive application of genomics to marine microbiology have revolutionized our understanding of the structure and function of microbial communities in the world ocean. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill was the first large-scale environmental disaster where genomics techniques were applied to track the microbial response to perturbation.  This session seeks to synthesize scientific achievements in microbial genomics to present advanced understanding and improved practices for assessing disturbance and environmental change in the global ocean system. Synthesis will focus on experimental results and modeling, employing microbial genomics data collected in the field and laboratory.  Presentations of technical, conceptual, and/or bioinformatic advances that drive use of genomics data in marine microbiology and studies linking “genomics” or “metagenomics” based studies with biogeochemistry and oceanography data sets, are encouraged. Integrated studies are critical for improving strategies for elucidating responses to perturbation across a range of spatial and temporal scales.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • CP - Coastal and Estuarine Processes
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
  • OB - Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry
Primary Chair:  Joel E Kostka, Georgia Institute of Technology Main Campus, Atlanta, GA, United States
Co-chairs:  Samantha B Joye, University of Georgia, Department of Marine Sciences, Athens, GA, United States, Casey RJ Hubert, University of Calgary, Biological Sciences, Calgary, AB, Canada and Rita R Colwell, University of Maryland College Park, Centre for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, College Park, MD, United States
Primary Liaison:  Joel E Kostka, Do Not Wish to Give out, Atlanta, GA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

The Crude-Oil Microbiome Webserver: An Interactive, Searchable (Meta-)Genome Repository That Expands The Catalogued Diversity Of Crude-Oil-Associated Microbes (655770)
Smruthi Karthikeyan1, Luis M Rodriguez-R2, Patrick Heritier-Robbins2, Markus H Huettel3, Joel E Kostka4 and Konstantinos Konstantinidis4, (1)Georgia Institute of Technology Main Campus, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Atlanta, GA, United States, (2)Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Atlanta, United States, (3)Florida St Univ, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Tallahassee, FL, United States, (4)Georgia Institute of Technology Main Campus, Atlanta, GA, United States
Comparative genomics of isolates obtained during the Deepwater Horizon Disaster - metabolic plasticity and nutrient acquisition. (653549)
Rachael Karns1, Tony Gutierrez2 and Samantha B Joye1, (1)University of Georgia, Department of Marine Sciences, Athens, GA, United States, (2)Heriot-Watt University, United Kingdom
Comparison of microbial growth and community structure in response to different crude oils with varying photoreactivity (643784)
Wade H Jeffrey1, Melissa Ederington-Hagy2, Lisa Nigro2, Arianna L Simmering3 and Erika L Headrick3, (1)University of West Florida, Department of Biology, Pensacola, FL, United States, (2)University of West Florida, Center for Environmental Diagnostics and Bioremediation, Pensacola, FL, United States, (3)University of West Florida, Center for Environmental Diagnostics & Bioremediation, Pensacola, FL, United States
Comparative metaproteomics to assess environmental changes: The combined effects of oil, sunlight and dispersant on marine microbial communities (650230)
Sabine Matallana Surget1, Lisa Nigro2, Lisa Waidner2, Johannes Werner3, Philippe Lebaron4 and Wade H Jeffrey2, (1)University of Stirling, Division of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Stirling, United Kingdom, (2)University of West Florida, Center for Environmental Diagnostics and Bioremediation, Pensacola, FL, United States, (3)Leibniz-Institute for Baltic Sea Research, Germany, (4)Sorbonne University, France
Sampling After the Storm: Combining Phytoplankton Imagery, Genomics and Physical Data to Assess Community Structure After a Hurricane (653357)
Darren Henrichs, Texas A&M University, Oceanography, College Station, TX, United States, Chetan C Gaonkar, Texas A&M University College Station, Oceanography, College Station, TX, United States and Lisa Campbell, Texas A & M University, Oceanopgraphy, College Station, TX, United States
Prokaryote Community and Physicochemical Shifts due to Storm Induced Terrestrial Runoff in Subtropical Coastal Ecosystems (645109)
Angela Ares1, Margaret Mars Brisbin1, Kirk Sato2,3, Juan Pablo Martin Diaz1, Yoshiteru Iinuma4 and Satoshi Mitarai5, (1)OIST Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Marine Biophysics Unit, Onna, Japan, (2)OIST Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Marine Biophysics Unit, Tancha, Japan, (3)University of Washington, Friday Harbor Laboratory, United States, (4)OIST Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Instrumental Analysis Section, Onna, Japan, (5)OIST Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Marine Biophysics Unit, Onna-son, Japan