CP11A:
Nearshore Processes I

Session ID#: 92955

Session Description:
The nearshore region is the transition zone from land to the open ocean. This region spans drastically different dynamical regimes with varying roles of waves, wind, tides, buoyancy, and morphology. The vulnerability of the coast to sea level rise, extreme storms, and anthropogenic influences is a major societal concern. Abstracts focusing on physical processes occurring in the nearshore region from the subaerial beach to the shelf break are invited. Interesting topics include: 1) surface and internal wave dynamics, 2) wind-, wave-, and tide-driven circulation, 3) extreme events in nearshore and river integrated systems, 4) mixing and turbulence, 5) cross-shelf exchange, 6) sediment transport and morphologic evolution, 7) process-based ecological or biological nearshore interactions. We welcome abstracts describing field observations (both remotely sensed and in-situ), numerical and laboratory modeling, theoretical analysis, and model-data assimilation. The nearshore processes session is an established and well-attended session in which student participation is strongly encouraged.
Index Terms:

3020 Littoral processes [MARINE GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS]
4217 Coastal processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4546 Nearshore processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
Primary Chair:  Jenna A Brown, U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St Petersburg, FL, United States
Co-chairs:  Sylvia Rodriguez-Abudo, University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez, Department of Engineering Sciences and Materials, Mayaguez, PR, United States and Christie Hegermiller, USGS Coastal and Marine Science Center Woods Hole, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Jenna A Brown, U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St Petersburg, FL, United States
Moderators:  Jenna A Brown, U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St Petersburg, FL, United States and Ty Hesser, US Army Corps of Engineers, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, Vicksburg, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Christie Hegermiller, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

A Detailed Investigation of Surf Zone Hydrodynamics using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations (658077)
Ryan Lowe, The University of Western Australia, Oceans Graduate School, School of Earth Sciences, and UWA Oceans Institute, Perth, WA, Australia, Mark L Buckley, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia, Corrado Altomare, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya – Barcelona Tech, Spain, Dirk Rijnsdorp, The University of Western Australia, WA, Australia, Yu Yao, Changsha University of Science and Technology, Changsha, China, Tomohiro Suzuki, Flanders Hydraulics Research, Belgium and Jeremy Bricker, Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands
Tridimensional Wave-Resolving Modeling of Nearshore Dynamics (638414)
Patrick Marchesiello, IRD Institute of Research for Development, LEGOS, Toulouse, France, Rachid Benshila, CNRS, Paris Cedex 16, France, Francis Auclair, Laboratoire d'Aérologie - Observatoire Midi Pyrénées, Toulouse, France, Rafael Almar, Laboratoire d'Etudes en Géophysique et Océanographie Spatiales (LEGOS), IRD, Toulouse, France and James C McWilliams, University of California in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, United States
Observations of Wind Effects on Shoaling Wave Shape (645562)
Falk Feddersen1, Adam Fincham2, Matthew S Spydell3, Katherine L Brodie4, Adam Young5, Derek Jeffrey Grimes6, Brittany Lynn Bruder7, Nicholas Spore4, Patrick Dickhudt7, Alex Poirot2, Gerald Kubiak2 and Ken Lucas2, (1)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)World Surf League Wave Company, United States, (3)SIO, La Jolla, United States, (4)U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, Field Research Facility, Duck, NC, United States, (5)University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, United States, (6)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Integrative Oceanography Division, La Jolla, CA, United States, (7)U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, Duck, NC, United States
Predicting the Onset and Strength of Breaking of Surface Gravity Waves from Deep to Shallow Water (652609)
James T Kirby Jr, University of Delaware, Center for Applied Coastal Research, Newark, DE, United States, Morteza Derakhti, Applied Physics Laboratory University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States, Michael L Banner, c/o The University of NSW, Sydney, NSW, Australia, Stephan T Grilli, University of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI, United States and Jim Thomson, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States
Wave-Breaking Modulation by Infragravity Waves (642250)
Yoshinao Matsuba, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Japan, Takenori Shimozono, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan and Shinji Sato, Kochi University of Technology, Japan
Experimental study on the effects of infragravity waves on the merging of multiple bores and the resulting runup (658201)
Chuan Li1, H Tuba Ozkan-Haller1, Pedro Lomonaco2, Timothy B Maddux1, Robert A Holman3, Peter Ruggiero1 and Gabriel García-Medina4, (1)Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States, (2)Universidad de Cantabria, Environmental Hydraulics Institute (IH Cantabria), Santander, Spain, (3)Oregon State Univ, Corvallis, OR, United States, (4)Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, United States
Numerical wave modeling with a Boussinesq-type model against insitu and LIDAR recorded field data on a sandy beach at Duck, NC (635823)
Gabriela Salgado, USACE - Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, Vicksburg, MS, United States, Matt Malej, USACE-Coastal & Hydraulics Lab, Vicksburg, MS, United States, Katherine L Brodie, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, Field Research Facility, Duck, NC, United States, Spicer Bak, US Army Corps of Engineers, Field Research Facility, Duck, United States, Ty Hesser, US Army Corps of Engineers, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, Vicksburg, United States and Fengyan Shi, University of Delaware, Center for Applied Coastal Research, Newark, DE, United States
Laboratory observations of the intermittent growth of edge waves with random incident waves (648250)
Xuelin Ding1, Giovanni Coco2, Robert T Guza3, Roland Garnier4, Colin Whittaker5, Robert A Dalrymple6, Zhangping Wei7, Pedro Lomonaco8, Paolo Blondeaux9 and Giovanna Vittori9, (1)University of Auckland, School of Environment, Auckland, New Zealand, (2)University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand, (3)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (4)Environmental Hydraulics Institute, Universidad de Cantabria, Santander, Spain, (5)University of Auckland, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Auckland, New Zealand, (6)Northwestern University, Department of Civil Engineering, Evanston, IL, United States, (7)Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States, (8)Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States, (9)University of Genova, Genova, Italy