ME41A:
Advances in the Ecology, Behavior, Physiology, or Conservation of Marine Top Predators I

Session ID#: 93017

Session Description:
Top predators are a vital part of the marine ecosystem, and as such, their ecology, behavior and physiology can influence important processes such as trophic interactions, carbon flow, and nutrient recycling. Virtually all top predators have a history of over-exploitation or they have special management status because of their sensitivity to marine industrial activities and other human uses (e.g., bycatch, shipping, resource exploration/extraction). Basic research on top predators often focuses on gaps in our understanding of their ecology, but unlike many other branches of biological oceanography, research can also be motivated directly by management and conservation needs. This session will focus on studies of the ecology, behavior, and physiology of marine top predators that either advance our scientific understanding or support the conservation of these important taxa. Because Ocean Sciences provides a unique forum for marine ecologists, marine biologists, and oceanographers to interact, we seek contributions from researchers studying a wide variety of taxa, including fish, squid, reptiles, seabirds, and marine mammals, from anywhere in the world’s oceans.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • PI - Physical-Biological Interactions
Index Terms:

4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4817 Food webs, structure, and dynamics [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4830 Higher trophic levels [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Mark Baumgartner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Co-Chair:  Daniel M Palacios, Oregon State University, Marine Mammal Institute and Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Newport, OR, United States
Primary Liaison:  Mark Baumgartner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Moderators:  Daniel M Palacios, Oregon State University, Marine Mammal Institute and Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Newport, OR, United States and Mark Baumgartner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Mark Baumgartner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Combining Accelerometers and Magnetometers to Better Estimate Energy Expenditure in Albatross Flight (656808)
Melinda Conners1, Rachael Orben2, Scott A Shaffer3 and Lesley H Thorne1, (1)Stony Brook University, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook, NY, United States, (2)Oregon State University, Newport, OR, United States, (3)San Jose State University, Department of Biological Sciences, San Jose, CA, United States
Conflicting Physiological Challenges between Thermoregulation and Diving Energetics in Elephant Seals (653709)
Arina Favilla1, Markus M Horning2 and Daniel P Costa1, (1)University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, (2)Alaska SeaLife Center, Science, Seward, AK, United States
Scalloped hammerhead shark swimming performance and thermoregulation strategies during deep dives into cold water: evidence of a marine mammal-like dive reflex? (643888)
Mark Royer1, Carl Meyer1, Kelsey Maloney1, Edward Cardona2, Kate Whittingham3, Chloe’ Blandino1, Guilherme Silva4 and Kim Holland1, (1)University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology, Kāneʻohe, HI, United States, (2)Bangor University, School of Ocean Science, Anglesey, United Kingdom, (3)Whitman College, Walla Walla, WA, United States, (4)Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Bringing Ecology, Behavior, and Physiology Together to Inform Conservation Efforts for a Declining Fur Seal Population (646714)
Elizabeth McHuron1, Noel Pelland2, Katie Luxa3, Kirstin Holsman4, Rolf Ream5, Tonya Zeppelin6 and Jeremy Sterling6, (1)University of Washington, Seattle, United States, (2)University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States, (3)University of Washington, WA, United States, (4)National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA, United States, (5)Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States, (6)NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States
Foraging habitat associations of North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) measured using ocean gliders (652762)
Kimberley Teresa Ann Davies1,2, Hansen Johnson2,3, Delphine Durette-Morin2, Mark Baumgartner3, Richard F. Davis4, Adam Comeau5, Frederick Gilbert Whoriskey6 and Christopher T. Taggart2, (1)University of New Brunswick, Biological Sciences, Saint John, NB, Canada, (2)Dalhousie University, Oceanography Department, Halifax, NS, Canada, (3)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (4)Ocean Frontiers Institute, Halifax, NS, Canada, (5)Coastal Environmental, Observation, Technology and Research (CEOTR) group, Halifax, NS, Canada, (6)Ocean Tracking Network, Halifax, NS, Canada
Trends in tuna carbon isotopes suggest global changes in pelagic phytoplankton communities (650330)
Anne Lorrain1, Heidi Pethybridge2, Nicolas Cassar3, Aurore Receveur4, Valérie Allain4, Nathalie Bodin5, Laurent Bopp6, Anela Choy7, Leanne Duffy8, B Fry9, Nicolas Goñi10, Brittany S Graham11, Alistair J Hobday12, John A Logan13, Frédéric Ménard14, Christophe Menkes15, Robert J. Olson16, Dan Pagendam17, David Point18, Andrew T Revill19, Christopher J Somes20 and Jock Young21, (1)Institute of Research for Development, Brest, France, (2)CSIRO Hobart, Hobart, TAS, Australia, (3)Duke University, Nicholas School of the Environment, Durham, NC, United States, (4)SPC, Nouméa, New Caledonia, (5)IRD, Seychelles, (6)LSCE Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex, France, (7)Scripps Institution of Oceanography UCSD, Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (8)IATTC, CA, United States, (9)Australian River Institute, QLD, Australia, (10)AZTI, Spain, (11)NIWA, New Zealand, (12)CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, Hobart, TAS, Australia, (13)Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries, MA, United States, (14)IRD, France, (15)IRD/LOCEAN, Nouméa, New Caledonia, (16)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (17)CSIRO, Data 61, Brisbane, QLD, Australia, (18)Géosciences Environnement Toulouse (GET), UMR CNRS / IRD / Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France, (19)Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Hobart, TAS, TAS, Australia, (20)GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany, (21)CSIRO, TAS, Australia
Dynamic fine-scale sea-icescape shapes adult emperor penguin foraging habitat in East Antarctica (648533)
Sara Labrousse1, Alexander D. Fraser2, Michael Sumner3, Takeshi Tamura4, David Pinaud5, Barbara Wienecke6, Roger Kirkwood6, Yan Ropert-Coudert5, Ryan Resinger5, Ian Jonsen7, Rick Porter-Smith8, Christophe Barbraud9, Charles André Bost10, Rubao Ji11 and Stephanie Jenouvrier1, (1)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (2)University of Tasmania, Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, Hobart, TAS, Australia, (3)Australian Antarctic Division, Channel Highway, Kingston, Tasmania 7050, Australia, TAS, Australia, (4)NIPR National Institute of Polar Research, Tokyo, Japan, (5)Centre d’Etudes Biologiques de Chizé, France, (6)Australian Antarctic Division, Kingston, TAS, Australia, (7)Macquarie University, Biological Sciences, Sydney, NSW, Australia, (8)University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia, (9)Centre d’Etudes Biologiques de Chizé (CEBC), UMR 7372 Université de la Rochelle-CNRS, Villiers-en-Bois, France, (10)Centre d’Etudes Biologiques de Chizé (CEBC), UMR 7372 Université de la Rochelle-CNRS, France, (11)Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., Biology Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Mesoscale Dynamics of Blue and Fin Whales and Antarctic Krill off East Antarctica (640741)
Ana Sirovic, Texas A&M University Galveston, Galveston, TX, United States, Megan Wood, Texas A&M University Galveston, Galveston, United States, Joseph D Warren, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, United States, Kathleen Stafford, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States and Brian Miller, Australian Antarctic Division, Kingston, TAS, Australia