ME42A:
Advances in the Ecology, Behavior, Physiology, or Conservation of Marine Top Predators II

Session ID#: 93021

Session Description:
Top predators are a vital part of the marine ecosystem, and as such, their ecology, behavior and physiology can influence important processes such as trophic interactions, carbon flow, and nutrient recycling. Virtually all top predators have a history of over-exploitation or they have special management status because of their sensitivity to marine industrial activities and other human uses (e.g., bycatch, shipping, resource exploration/extraction). Basic research on top predators often focuses on gaps in our understanding of their ecology, but unlike many other branches of biological oceanography, research can also be motivated directly by management and conservation needs. This session will focus on studies of the ecology, behavior, and physiology of marine top predators that either advance our scientific understanding or support the conservation of these important taxa. Because Ocean Sciences provides a unique forum for marine ecologists, marine biologists, and oceanographers to interact, we seek contributions from researchers studying a wide variety of taxa, including fish, squid, reptiles, seabirds, and marine mammals, from anywhere in the world’s oceans.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • PI - Physical-Biological Interactions
Index Terms:

4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4817 Food webs, structure, and dynamics [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4830 Higher trophic levels [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Mark Baumgartner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Co-Chair:  Daniel M Palacios, Oregon State University, Marine Mammal Institute and Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Newport, OR, United States
Primary Liaison:  Mark Baumgartner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Moderators:  Mark Baumgartner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States and Daniel M Palacios, Oregon State University, Marine Mammal Institute and Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Newport, OR, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Mark Baumgartner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Oceanographic Influences on Tuna Dive Behaviors (656021)
Simon Dedman1, Michael Castleton1, Robert Schallert1, Mike Stokesbury2, James Ganong3 and Barbara Block1, (1)Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove, CA, United States, (2)Acadia University, Biology, NS, Canada, (3)Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, United States
When Carnivores Clash: Evidence of Competition and Prey-shifting by Brown Bears During a Period of Sea Otter Recovery (637913)
Daniel H. Monson1, Grant Hilderbrand2, Heather A Coletti3, Joy Erlenbach4, Brenda E Ballachey5, Benjamin Pister6, Buck Mangipane7, James L. Bodkin2 and Tom Smith8, (1)USGS Alaska Science Center, Anchorage, AK, United States, (2)USGS Alaska Science Center, Anchorage, United States, (3)National Park Service Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United States, (4)Washington State University, Pullman, United States, (5)U.S. Geological Survey, AB, Canada, (6)National Park Service, Ocean Alaska Science and Learning Center, Seward, AK, United States, (7)National Park Service, Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, Port Alsworth, AK, United States, (8)Brigham Young University, Provo, United States
The Patchy Distribution of Krill Within Temporally Transient Large Swarms Drives Collective Exploitation By Super Groups of Rorqual Whales (642508)
David Cade1,2, Mduduzi Seakamela3, Kenneth Findlay4, James Fahlbusch5, Shirel Kahane-Rapport6, William Oestreich1, John Phillip Ryan7, Elliott L. Hazen8, Ari S Friedlaender2, John Calambokidis5, Joseph D Warren9, Julie Fukunaga10, Steve Kirkman3, Deon Kotze3, Steven McCue3, Michael Meyer3, Christopher Wilke3 and Jeremy A Goldbogen11, (1)Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biology, Pacific Grove, CA, United States, (2)University of California Santa Cruz, Institute of Marine Science, Santa Cruz, CA, United States, (3)South Africa Department of the Environment, South Africa, (4)Cape Peninsula University of Technology, South Africa, (5)Cascadia Research Collective, Olympia, WA, United States, (6)Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, United States, (7)MBARI, Moss Landing, CA, United States, (8)NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Environmental Research Division, Monterey, CA, United States, (9)Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, United States, (10)Stanford University, United States, (11)Hopkins Marine Station/ Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA, United States
Northern fur seals and fish predators feeding on pollock in the eastern Bering Sea: a look at summer prey availability and spatial overlap over 35 years (657220)
Ivonne Ortiz, University of Washington, JISAO, Seattle, WA, United States, Elizabeth McHuron, University of Washington, Seattle, United States and Jeremy Sterling, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States
A BIRDSEYE VIEW: HOW CAN WE CAPTURE POTENTIAL SHARK NURSERY AREAS WITH UAV TECHNOLOGY? – SAN CRISTÓBAL, GALÁPAGOS (646901)
Lauren Goodman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Environment, Ecology & Energy Program, Chapel Hill, NC, United States and Alexander Hearn, Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Ecuador
The effects of seasonal variation, El Niño-Southern Oscillation events, and climate change on the tuna-dolphin association in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean (635949)
Caitlynn Birch, University of California San Diego, Environmental and Ocean Sciences, San Diego, CA, United States and Michael D Scott, Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC), San Diego, CA, United States
Mercury stable isotopes reveal sources of mercury and prey in large (≥5 year old) Pacific bluefin tuna from the western North Pacific Ocean (647278)
Xiaoshuai He1, Chun-Mao Tseng2 and John R Reinfelder1, (1)Rutgers University, Environmental Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, (2)Institute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan