ME43A:
Advances in the Ecology, Behavior, Physiology, or Conservation of Marine Top Predators III

Session ID#: 93025

Session Description:
Top predators are a vital part of the marine ecosystem, and as such, their ecology, behavior and physiology can influence important processes such as trophic interactions, carbon flow, and nutrient recycling. Virtually all top predators have a history of over-exploitation or they have special management status because of their sensitivity to marine industrial activities and other human uses (e.g., bycatch, shipping, resource exploration/extraction). Basic research on top predators often focuses on gaps in our understanding of their ecology, but unlike many other branches of biological oceanography, research can also be motivated directly by management and conservation needs. This session will focus on studies of the ecology, behavior, and physiology of marine top predators that either advance our scientific understanding or support the conservation of these important taxa. Because Ocean Sciences provides a unique forum for marine ecologists, marine biologists, and oceanographers to interact, we seek contributions from researchers studying a wide variety of taxa, including fish, squid, reptiles, seabirds, and marine mammals, from anywhere in the world’s oceans.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • PI - Physical-Biological Interactions
Index Terms:

4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4817 Food webs, structure, and dynamics [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4830 Higher trophic levels [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Mark Baumgartner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Co-Chair:  Daniel M Palacios, Oregon State University, Marine Mammal Institute and Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Newport, OR, United States
Primary Liaison:  Mark Baumgartner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Moderators:  Mark Baumgartner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States and Daniel M Palacios, Oregon State University, Marine Mammal Institute and Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Newport, OR, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Mark Baumgartner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology Department, Woods Hole, MA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Temporal variations in blue whale call types in the northeast Pacific at diel, seasonal, and interannual time scales with tag-derived behavioral context (639068)
William Oestreich1, Danelle E Cline2, David Cade1, John Calambokidis3, James Fahlbusch3,4, John Joseph5, Tetyana Margolina6, Brandon Southall7, Jeremy A Goldbogen1 and John Phillip Ryan2, (1)Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biology, Pacific Grove, CA, United States, (2)MBARI, Moss Landing, CA, United States, (3)Cascadia Research Collective, Olympia, WA, United States, (4)Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biology, Stanford, CA, United States, (5)Naval Postgraduate School, Oceanography, Monterey, United States, (6)Naval Postgraduate School, Department of Oceanography, Monterey, CA, United States, (7)Southall Environmental Associates, Inc., CA, United States
Divergent trophic responses of sympatric penguin species to historic anthropogenic exploitation and recent climate change (639355)
Kelton McMahon1, Chantel Michelson2 and Michael J Polito2, (1)University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States, (2)Louisiana State University, Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Baton Rouge, LA, United States
Through the looking glass: Using epidermal microbiomes to peer into the health of Bristol Bay and Cook Inlet beluga whales (655474)
Amy Van Cise, Cascadia Research Collective, Olympia, WA, United States; Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, WA, United States, Paul R Wade, NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA, United States, Caroline EC Goertz, Alaska SeaLife Center, Seward, AK, United States, Kathy Burek-Huntington, Alaska Veterinary Pathology Service, Eagle River, AK, United States, Kim Parsons, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA, United States, Rod Hobbs, NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, retired, Seattle, WA, United States and Amy Apprill, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Marine Chemistry & Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States
Potential Impact of Mid-Frequency Active Sonar on Whales from Passive Acoustic Monitoring Data (643637)
Alba Solsona Berga1, Jennifer S Trickey1, Ally Rice1, Ana Sirovic2, Marie A Roch3, Charles Paxton4, Cornelia S. Oedekoven4, Sean M. Wiggins5, John A. Hildebrand1, Len Thomas4 and Simone Baumann-Pickering1, (1)University of California, San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)Texas A&M University at Galveston, Galveston, TX, United States, (3)San Diego State University, Department of Computer Science, San Diego, CA, United States, (4)University of St. Andrews, Centre for Research into Ecological and Environmental Modelling, St. Andrews, United Kingdom, (5)University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
Elucidating climate, density, and oil spill effects on Kemp’s ridley sea turtle somatic growth rates (640039)
Matthew David Ramirez, Oregon State University, Fisheries and Wildlife, Corvallis, OR, United States, Larisa Avens, NOAA NMFS, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Beaufort Laboratory, Beaufort, NC, United States, Lisa R. Goshe, NOAA NMFS, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Beaufort Laboratory, United States, Melissa L. Snover, Population Ecology Services, American Samoa, Melissa Cook, NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Pascagoula, MS, United States, Heather Haas, NOAA NMFS, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, United States and Selina S Heppell, Oregon State University, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Corvallis, OR, United States
Humpback and Minke Whales Increase the Intensity of Their Calls in Increased Background Noise From Natural Sources (652695)
Regina Guazzo1, Tyler Helble1, Cameron Martin1, Ian Durbach2, Gabriela Alongi3, Stephen Martin3 and E. Elizabeth Henderson1, (1)Naval Information Warfare Center Pacific, San Diego, CA, United States, (2)University of St Andrews, St Andrews, United Kingdom, (3)National Marine Mammal Foundation, San Diego, CA, United States
Observations and simulations of interannual variability in the first migration of Bering Sea northern fur seal pups (657008)
Noel Pelland1, Jeremy Sterling2, Devin Johnson2 and Mary-Anne Lea3, (1)National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States, (2)NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States, (3)University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia